public servant


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public servant

n.
A person who holds a government position by election or appointment.

public servant

n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an elected or appointed holder of a public office
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Austral and NZ a member of the public service. British equivalent: civil servant

pub′lic serv′ant


n.
a person holding a government office or job by election or appointment.
[1670–80]

public servant

A person who holds office in a government.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.public servant - someone who holds a government position (either by election or appointment)public servant - someone who holds a government position (either by election or appointment)
election - a vote to select the winner of a position or political office; "the results of the election will be announced tonight"
employee - a worker who is hired to perform a job
caseworker, social worker, welfare worker - someone employed to provide social services (especially to the disadvantaged)
Translations

public servant

nfunzionario/a della pubblica amministrazione
References in classic literature ?
Because the Circumlocution Office was down upon any ill-advised public servant who was going to do it, or who appeared to be by any surprising accident in remote danger of doing it, with a minute, and a memorandum, and a letter of instructions that extinguished him.
As it was, Mr Barnacle, finding his gentlemanly residence extremely inconvenient and extremely dear, always laid it, as a public servant, at the door of the country, and adduced it as another instance of the country's parsimony.
My public servants have been fools and rogues from the date of your accession to power," replied the State; "my legislative bodies, both State and municipal, are bands of thieves; my taxes are insupportable; my courts are corrupt; my cities are a disgrace to civilisation; my corporations have their hands at the throats of every private interest - all my affairs are in disorder and criminal confusion.
If we say that five or six hundred citizens are as many as can jointly exercise their right of suffrage, must we not deprive the people of the immediate choice of their public servants, in every instance where the administration of the government does not require as many of them as will amount to one for that number of citizens?
By the frame of the government under which we live, this same people have wisely given their public servants but little power for mischief; and have, with equal wisdom, provided for the return of that little to their own hands at very short intervals.
When this tale is told, I propose to lecture on the subject, to which all the editors in the country will receive the usual free tickets, when the world cannot fail of knowing quite as much, at least, as these meritorious public servants.
From the reduction in the number of public servants owing to the island having been given up by the East Indian Company, and the consequent emigration of many of the richer people, the poverty probably will increase.
And indeed all these gentlemen were so very persevering and energetic in this latter particular, and bestowed their favours so abundantly upon the carpet, that I take it for granted the Presidential housemaids have high wages, or, to speak more genteelly, an ample amount of 'compensation:' which is the American word for salary, in the case of all public servants.
I notice too that the ground on which eminent public servants urge the claims of popular education is fear; 'This country is filling up with thousands and millions of voters, and you must educate them to keep them from our throats.
Rick Perry, who was indicted last year in Travis County on charges he abused his power and coerced a public servant.
In the proposed Section 7( 2), also recommended by the Law Commission in its report on amendments to the Prevention of Corruption Act, the obligation of a public servant has been explicitly delineated in a way that the public servant deters from violating a statutory duty or any set of rules, government policies, executive instructions and procedures.
An anti-terrorism court on October 30 had awarded imprisonment of five years under section 7 of Anti Terrorism Act 1997, three months under section 186 of PPC (obstructing public servant in discharge of public functions), two years under section 353 of PPC (assault or criminal force to deter public servant from discharge of his duty), two years under section 427 of PPC (mischief causing damage and smashing vehicles) and two years under section 506 of PPC (punishment for criminal intimidation).

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