puckle

puckle

(ˈpʌkəl)
n
rare a mischievous or evil spirit
References in periodicals archive ?
1718: The first machine gun was patented by London lawyer James Puckle who, as a keen fisherman, intended to use it at sea.
1718: The first machine gun was patented by London lawyer James Puckle who intended it mainly for maritime use, though he also proposed a version firing square (therefore more damaging) bullets for use when facing Muslim rather than Christian opponents.
1718: The first machine gun was patented by keen fisherman James Puckle.
Puckle nonetheless felt compelled to respond to the ridiculous arguments, telling the speaker "there's no sense in all you've been saying" and raising numerous counterexamples to undermine her argument.
Steven Ross, Stirling, said: "Good to see referees again giving Celtic breaks by not awarding a blatant penalty to Caley Thistle" Norman Puckle, London, said: "I keep reading criticism of Scottish referees but they aren't great in England either.
The Ribauldequin, an early volley gun, was first fielded in 1339 and the revolver-like Puckle Gun in 1718.
Pickle or puckle, of course, means the opposite of mickle or muckle - a little of something.
The attorneys for one of the suspects are Puckle, Puckle and Nunnery.
22) One early design was the eleven-round "Defence Gun," patented in 1718 by lawyer and inventor James Puckle.
The Puckle Gun is another of the early signs that repeating firearms were possible, even if not completely practical because of the limitations of manufacturing.
Puckle (1926) proposed that the funeral was a vestige of the superstitious fear of the dead that was characteristic of pagan or primitive societies.
1965 Jack Jarvis has two runners for the nursery at Sandown, and maybe the owners' pecking order comes into play as Lord Rosebery's St Puckle beats Claude Lilley's P retendere.