pull


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to pull: pull out, pull off, blanco, groin pull, lefties

pull

 (po͝ol)
v. pulled, pull·ing, pulls
v.tr.
1. To apply force to (something) so as to cause or tend to cause motion toward the source of the force: pulled her chair up to the table; pulled the wagon down the street.
2. To remove from a fixed position; extract: The dentist pulled the tooth.
3. To tug at; jerk or tweak: I pulled the lever until it broke.
4. To rip or tear; rend: The dog pulled the toy to pieces.
5. To stretch (taffy, for example) repeatedly.
6. To strain (a muscle, for example) injuriously.
7. Informal To attract; draw: a performer who pulls large crowds.
8. Slang To draw out (a weapon) in readiness for use: pull a gun; pulled a knife on me.
9. Informal To remove: pulled the car's engine; pulled the tainted meat product from the stores.
10. Sports To hit (a ball) so that it moves in the direction away from the dominant hand of the player propelling it, as to the left of a right-handed player.
11. Nautical
a. To operate (an oar) in rowing.
b. To transport or propel by rowing.
c. To be rowed by: That boat pulls six oars.
12. To rein in (a horse) to keep it from winning a race.
13. Printing To produce (a print or an impression) from type.
v.intr.
1. To exert force in moving something toward the source of the force: Pull harder and the window will open.
2.
a. To move in a certain direction or toward a certain goal: pulled into the driveway; pulled even with the race leader.
b. To gain a position closer to an objective: Our team has pulled within three points of the league leader.
3. To drink or inhale deeply: pulled on the cold beer with gusto; pull on a cigarette.
4. Nautical To row a boat.
5. Informal To express or feel great sympathy or empathy: We're pulling for our new president.
n.
1. The act or process of pulling: gave the drawer a pull.
2. Force exerted in pulling or required to overcome resistance in pulling: How much pull does this tugboat have?
3. A sustained effort: a long pull across the mountains.
4. Something, such as a knob on a drawer, that is used for pulling.
5. A deep inhalation or draft, as on a cigarette or of a beverage.
6. Slang A means of gaining special advantage; influence: The lobbyist has pull with the senator.
7. Informal The ability to draw or attract; appeal: a star with pull at the box office.
Phrasal Verbs:
pull ahead
To move ahead, as in a race.
pull away
1. To move away or backward; withdraw: The limousine pulled away from the curb.
2. To move ahead of another or others: The horse pulled away and took the lead in the race.
pull back
1. To withdraw or retreat.
2. To reduce one's involvement in a given enterprise.
pull down
1. To demolish; destroy: pull down an old office building.
2. To reduce to a lower level: The bad news pulled down stock prices.
3. To depress, as in spirits or health.
4. Informal To draw (money) as wages: pulls down a hefty salary.
pull in
1. To arrive at a destination: We pulled in at midnight.
2. To obtain, earn, or secure: How much money does he pull in? She pulled in half of the opponent's supporters.
3. To rein in; restrain: pulled in the investigators.
4. To arrest (a criminal suspect, for example).
pull off Informal
To accomplish in spite of difficulties or obstacles; bring off: pulled off a last-minute victory.
pull out
1. To leave or depart: The train pulls out at noon.
2. To withdraw, as from a situation or commitment: After the crash, many Wall Street investors pulled out.
pull over
1. To bring a vehicle to a stop at a curb or at the side of a road: We pulled over to watch the sunset.
2. To force (a motorist or a vehicle) to stop at a curb or at the side of a road: The state trooper pulled the speeding motorist over.
pull round
To restore or be restored to sound health.
pull through
To come or bring successfully through trouble or illness.
pull up
1. To bring or come to a halt: The driver pulled the car up at the curb. The car pulled up in front of the hotel.
2. To approach and arrive at a destination: We watched the plane pull up to the gate.
3. To increase or cause to increase in altitude: The plane pulled up just enough to miss the tower.
4. To advance or regain position, as in a race.
5. To check the action of: The remark pulled him up short.
6. To reprove or rebuke: They were pulled up for wasting money.
7. Basketball To stop one's progress and bring the ball up above one's head in order to take a jump shot.
Idioms:
pull a fast one Informal
To play a trick or perpetrate a fraud.
pull (oneself) together
To regain one's composure.
pull (one's) punches
To refrain from deploying all the resources or force at one's disposal: didn't pull any punches during the negotiations.
pull (one's) weight
To do one's own share, as of work.
pull out all the stops Informal
To deploy all the resources or force at one's disposal: The Inaugural Committee pulled out all the stops when arranging the ceremonies.
pull (someone's) leg
To play a joke on; tease or deceive.
pull something
To carry out a deception or swindle: worried that his partners might be trying to pull something behind his back.
pull strings/wires Informal
To exert secret control or influence in order to gain an end.
pull the plug on Slang
To stop supporting or bring to an end: pulled the plug on the new art courses.
pull the rug (out) from under Informal
To remove all support and assistance from, usually suddenly.
pull the string
Baseball To throw an off-speed pitch.
pull the wool over (someone's) eyes
To deceive; hoodwink.
pull together
To make a joint effort.
pull up stakes
To clear out; leave: She pulled up stakes in New England and moved to the desert.

[Middle English pullen, from Old English pullian.]

pull′er n.
Synonyms: pull, drag, draw, haul, tow1, tug
These verbs mean to cause something to move toward the source of an applied force: pull a sled up a hill; drag furniture across the floor; drew up a chair; hauls wood from the forest; a car that tows a trailer; tugged my sleeve.
Antonym: push

pull

(pʊl)
vb (mainly tr)
1. (General Physics) (also intr) to exert force on (an object) so as to draw it towards the source of the force
2. to exert force on so as to remove; extract: to pull a tooth.
3. (Zoology) to strip of feathers, hair, etc; pluck
4. (Agriculture) to draw the entrails from (a fowl)
5. to rend or tear
6. (Pathology) to strain (a muscle, ligament, or tendon) injuriously
7. (usually foll by off) informal to perform or bring about: to pull off a million-pound deal.
8. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) (often foll by on) informal to draw out (a weapon) for use: he pulled a knife on his attacker.
9. informal to attract: the pop group pulled a crowd.
10. (also intr) slang to attract (a sexual partner)
11. (intr; usually foll by on or at) to drink or inhale deeply: to pull at one's pipe; pull on a bottle of beer.
12. to put on or make (a grimace): to pull a face.
13. (Automotive Engineering) (also intr; foll by away, out, over, etc) to move (a vehicle) or (of a vehicle) be moved in a specified manner: he pulled his car away from the roadside.
14. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing to take (a proof) from type
15. to withdraw or remove: the board decided to pull their support.
16. (General Sporting Terms) sport to hit (a ball) so that it veers away from the direction in which the player intended to hit it (to the left for a right-handed player)
17. (Cricket) cricket to hit (a ball pitched straight or on the off side) to the leg side
18. (Team Sports, other than specified) hurling to strike (a fast-moving ball) in the same direction as it is already moving
19. (Rowing) (also intr) to row (a boat) or take a stroke of (an oar) in rowing
20. (Rowing) to be rowed by: a racing shell pulls one, two, four, or eight oars.
21. (Horse Racing) (of a rider) to restrain (a horse), esp to prevent it from winning a race
22. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) (intr) (of a horse) to resist strongly the attempts of a rider to rein in or check it
23. pull a fast one slang to play a sly trick
24. pull apart pull to pieces to criticize harshly
25. pull your head in informal Austral be quiet!
26. pull one's punches
a. informal to restrain the force of one's criticisms or actions
b. boxing to restrain the force of one's blows, esp when deliberately losing after being bribed, etc
27. (Boxing) boxing to restrain the force of one's blows, esp when deliberately losing after being bribed, etc
28. pull one's weight informal to do one's fair or proper share of a task
29. pull strings informal to exercise personal influence, esp secretly or unofficially
30. pull someone's leg informal to make fun of, fool, or tease someone
n
31. an act or an instance of pulling or being pulled
32. the force or effort used in pulling: the pull of the moon affects the tides on earth.
33. (Physiology) the act or an instance of taking in drink or smoke
34. (Tools) something used for pulling, such as a knob or handle
35. informal special advantage or influence: his uncle is chairman of the company, so he has quite a lot of pull.
36. informal the power to attract attention or support
37. (Rowing) a period of rowing
38. (Rowing) a single stroke of an oar in rowing
39. (Ball Games, other than specified) the act of pulling the ball in golf, cricket, etc
40. (Horse Racing) the act of checking or reining in a horse
41. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) the amount of resistance in a bowstring, trigger, etc
42. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) the amount of resistance in a bowstring, trigger, etc
[Old English pullian; related to Icelandic pūla to beat]
ˈpuller n

pull

(pʊl)

v.t.
1. to draw or haul toward oneself or itself, in a particular direction, or into a particular position.
2. to draw or tug at with force.
3. to rend; tear: to pull a cloth to pieces.
4. to draw or pluck away from a place of growth, attachment, etc.: to pull a tooth.
5. to draw out (a weapon) for ready use.
6. to perform; carry out: They pulled a spectacular coup.
7. to put on; affect: He pulled a long face when I reprimanded him.
8. to withdraw; remove: to pull an ineffective pitcher.
9. to attract; win: to pull votes.
10. to take (an impression or proof) from type, a cut or plate, etc.
11. to propel by rowing, as a boat.
12. to strain (a muscle, ligament, or tendon).
13. to be assigned (a specific duty).
14. to hold in (a racehorse), esp. so as to prevent from winning.
15. to hit (a baseball) so that it follows the direction in which the bat is being swung.
v.i.
16. to exert a drawing, tugging, or hauling force (often fol. by at).
17. to inhale through a pipe, cigarette, etc.
18. to become or come as specified, by being pulled.
19. to move or go: The train pulled away from the station.
20. to row.
21. pull apart, to analyze critically esp. for errors.
22. pull down,
a. to draw downward.
b. to demolish; wreck.
c. to lower; reduce.
d. Informal. to receive as a salary; earn: He is pulling down more than fifty thousand a year.
23. pull for, to support actively; encourage: They were pulling for the Republican candidate.
24. pull in,
a. to arrive.
b. to tighten; curb: to pull in the reins.
c. Informal. to arrest (someone).
25. pull off, Informal. to perform successfully, esp. something difficult.
26. pull out,
a. to depart.
b. to abandon abruptly: to pull out of an agreement.
27. pull over, to direct one's automobile or other vehicle to the curb.
28. pull through, to come safely through (a crisis, illness, etc.).
29. pull up,
a. to bring or come to a halt.
b. to bring or draw closer.
c. to root up.
n.
30. the act of pulling or drawing.
31. force used in pulling; pulling power.
32. a drawing in of smoke or a liquid through the mouth.
33. influence, as with persons able to grant favors.
34. a part or thing to be pulled, as a handle on a drawer.
35. a spell, or turn, at rowing.
36. a stroke of an oar.
37. a pulled muscle.
38. a pulling of the ball, as in baseball or golf.
39. the ability to attract.
Idioms:
1. pull oneself together, to regain command of one's emotions.
2. pull strings or wires, to use influence, as with powerful associates, to gain one's objectives.
[before 1000; Middle English pullen (v.), Old English pullian to pluck, pluck the feathers of, pull, tug; compare Middle Low German pūlen to strip off husks, pick, Old Norse pūla to work hard]

pull


Past participle: pulled
Gerund: pulling

Imperative
pull
pull
Present
I pull
you pull
he/she/it pulls
we pull
you pull
they pull
Preterite
I pulled
you pulled
he/she/it pulled
we pulled
you pulled
they pulled
Present Continuous
I am pulling
you are pulling
he/she/it is pulling
we are pulling
you are pulling
they are pulling
Present Perfect
I have pulled
you have pulled
he/she/it has pulled
we have pulled
you have pulled
they have pulled
Past Continuous
I was pulling
you were pulling
he/she/it was pulling
we were pulling
you were pulling
they were pulling
Past Perfect
I had pulled
you had pulled
he/she/it had pulled
we had pulled
you had pulled
they had pulled
Future
I will pull
you will pull
he/she/it will pull
we will pull
you will pull
they will pull
Future Perfect
I will have pulled
you will have pulled
he/she/it will have pulled
we will have pulled
you will have pulled
they will have pulled
Future Continuous
I will be pulling
you will be pulling
he/she/it will be pulling
we will be pulling
you will be pulling
they will be pulling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pulling
you have been pulling
he/she/it has been pulling
we have been pulling
you have been pulling
they have been pulling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pulling
you will have been pulling
he/she/it will have been pulling
we will have been pulling
you will have been pulling
they will have been pulling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pulling
you had been pulling
he/she/it had been pulling
we had been pulling
you had been pulling
they had been pulling
Conditional
I would pull
you would pull
he/she/it would pull
we would pull
you would pull
they would pull
Past Conditional
I would have pulled
you would have pulled
he/she/it would have pulled
we would have pulled
you would have pulled
they would have pulled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pull - the act of pullingpull - the act of pulling; applying force to move something toward or with you; "the pull up the hill had him breathing harder"; "his strenuous pulling strained his back"
actuation, propulsion - the act of propelling
drag - the act of dragging (pulling with force); "the drag up the hill exhausted him"
haul, haulage, draw - the act of drawing or hauling something; "the haul up the hill went very slowly"
tug, jerk - a sudden abrupt pull
draught, drawing, draft - the act of moving a load by drawing or pulling
deracination, extirpation, excision - the act of pulling up or out; uprooting; cutting off from existence
pluck - the act of pulling and releasing a taut cord
traction - (orthopedics) the act of pulling on a bone or limb (as in a fracture) to relieve pressure or align parts in a special way during healing; "his leg was in traction for several days"
2.pull - the force used in pulling; "the pull of the moon"; "the pull of the current"
force - (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity; "force equals mass times acceleration"
3.pull - special advantage or influence; "the chairman's nephew has a lot of pull"
advantage, vantage - the quality of having a superior or more favorable position; "the experience gave him the advantage over me"
4.pull - a device used for pulling something; "he grabbed the pull and opened the drawer"
bellpull - a handle or cord that is pulled to ring a doorbell or a servant's bell etc.
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
pull chain - a chain (usually with a handle at the end) that is pulled in order to operate some mechanism (e.g. to flush a toilet)
5.pull - a sharp strain on muscles or ligamentspull - a sharp strain on muscles or ligaments; "the wrench to his knee occurred as he fell"; "he was sidelined with a hamstring pull"
harm, hurt, injury, trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
sprain - a painful injury to a joint caused by a sudden wrenching of its ligaments
6.pull - a slow inhalation (as of tobacco smoke); "he took a puff on his pipe"; "he took a drag on his cigarette and expelled the smoke slowly"
smoking, smoke - the act of smoking tobacco or other substances; "he went outside for a smoke"; "smoking stinks"
breathing in, inhalation, intake, aspiration, inspiration - the act of inhaling; the drawing in of air (or other gases) as in breathing
toke - a puff of a marijuana or hashish cigarette; "the boys took a few tokes on a joint"
7.pull - a sustained effort; "it was a long pull but we made it"
elbow grease, exertion, effort, travail, sweat - use of physical or mental energy; hard work; "he got an A for effort"; "they managed only with great exertion"
Verb1.pull - cause to move by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled"
twitch - move or pull with a sudden motion
pull back - move to a rearward position; pull towards the back; "Pull back your arms!"
adduct - draw a limb towards the body; "adduct the thigh muscle"
abduct - pull away from the body; "this muscle abducts"
stretch - pull in opposite directions; "During the Inquisition, the torturers would stretch their victims on a rack"
pluck, plunk, pick - pull lightly but sharply with a plucking motion; "he plucked the strings of his mandolin"
tug - pull or strain hard at; "Each oar was tugged by several men"
drag - pull, as against a resistance; "He dragged the big suitcase behind him"; "These worries were dragging at him"
cart, haul, drag, hale - draw slowly or heavily; "haul stones"; "haul nets"
attract, pull in, draw in, pull, draw - direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes; "Her good looks attract the stares of many men"; "The ad pulled in many potential customers"; "This pianist pulls huge crowds"; "The store owner was happy that the ad drew in many new customers"
jerk, yank - pull, or move with a sudden movement; "He turned the handle and jerked the door open"
winch - pull or lift up with or as if with a winch; "winch up the slack line"
pluck, pull off, tweak, pick off - pull or pull out sharply; "pluck the flowers off the bush"
pull - apply force so as to cause motion towards the source of the motion; "Pull the rope"; "Pull the handle towards you"; "pull the string gently"; "pull the trigger of the gun"; "pull your knees towards your chin"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
pull, draw - cause to move in a certain direction by exerting a force upon, either physically or in an abstract sense; "A declining dollar pulled down the export figures for the last quarter"
extract, pull out, pull up, draw out, take out, pull - remove, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense; "pull weeds"; "extract a bad tooth"; "take out a splinter"; "extract information from the telegram"
pull back - move to a rearward position; pull towards the back; "Pull back your arms!"
pull along, schlep, shlep - pull along heavily, like a heavy load against a resistance; "Can you shlep this bag of potatoes upstairs?"; "She pulled along a large trunk"
attract, pull in, draw in, pull, draw - direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes; "Her good looks attract the stares of many men"; "The ad pulled in many potential customers"; "This pianist pulls huge crowds"; "The store owner was happy that the ad drew in many new customers"
pluck, pull off, tweak, pick off - pull or pull out sharply; "pluck the flowers off the bush"
pull down, rase, raze, dismantle, tear down, level, take down - tear down so as to make flat with the ground; "The building was levelled"
push, force - move with force, "He pushed the table into a corner"
2.pull - direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributespull - direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes; "Her good looks attract the stares of many men"; "The ad pulled in many potential customers"; "This pianist pulls huge crowds"; "The store owner was happy that the ad drew in many new customers"
draw, pull, force - cause to move by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled"
tug - pull hard; "The prisoner tugged at the chains"; "This movie tugs at the heart strings"
arrest, catch, get - attract and fix; "His look caught her"; "She caught his eye"; "Catch the attention of the waiter"
draw in, retract - pull inward or towards a center; "The pilot drew in the landing gear"; "The cat retracted his claws"
bring - attract the attention of; "The noise and the screaming brought the curious"
curl up, curl, draw in - shape one's body into a curl; "She curled farther down under the covers"; "She fell and drew in"
3.pull - move into a certain direction; "the car pulls to the right"
pull - steer into a certain direction; "pull one's horse to a stand"; "Pull the car over"
drive - move by being propelled by a force; "The car drove around the corner"
cut in - drive in front of another vehicle leaving too little space for that vehicle to maneuver comfortably
4.pull - apply force so as to cause motion towards the source of the motion; "Pull the rope"; "Pull the handle towards you"; "pull the string gently"; "pull the trigger of the gun"; "pull your knees towards your chin"
wrench, twist - twist or pull violently or suddenly, especially so as to remove (something) from that to which it is attached or from where it originates; "wrench a window off its hinges"; "wrench oneself free from somebody's grip"; "a deep sigh was wrenched from his chest"
gather - draw and bring closer; "she gathered her shawl around her shoulders"
attract - exert a force on (a body) causing it to approach or prevent it from moving away; "the gravitational pull of a planet attracts other bodies"
force - do forcibly; exert force; "Don't force it!"
draw, pull, force - cause to move by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled"
hike up, hitch up - pull up; "He hitched up his socks and pants"
pick at, pluck at, pull at - pluck or pull at with the fingers; "She picked nervously at the buttons of her blouse"
draw back, pull back, retract - use a surgical instrument to hold open (the edges of a wound or an organ)
draw close - pull towards oneself; "He drew the crying child close"
5.pull - perform an act, usually with a negative connotation; "perpetrate a crime"; "pull a bank robbery"
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
make - carry out or commit; "make a mistake"; "commit a faux-pas"
recommit - commit once again, as of a crime
6.pull - bring, take, or pull out of a container or from under a cover; "draw a weapon"; "pull out a gun"; "The mugger pulled a knife on his victim"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
pull - take away; "pull the old soup cans from the supermarket shelf"
extract, pull out, pull up, draw out, take out, pull - remove, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense; "pull weeds"; "extract a bad tooth"; "take out a splinter"; "extract information from the telegram"
unsheathe - draw from a sheath or scabbard; "the knight unsheathed his sword"
draw, take out - take liquid out of a container or well; "She drew water from the barrel"
7.pull - steer into a certain direction; "pull one's horse to a stand"; "Pull the car over"
drive - cause someone or something to move by driving; "She drove me to school every day"; "We drove the car to the garage"
pull - move into a certain direction; "the car pulls to the right"
8.pull - strain abnormally; "I pulled a muscle in my leg when I jumped up"; "The athlete pulled a tendon in the competition"
injure, wound - cause injuries or bodily harm to
9.pull - cause to move in a certain direction by exerting a force upon, either physically or in an abstract sense; "A declining dollar pulled down the export figures for the last quarter"
draw, pull, force - cause to move by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
10.pull - operate when rowing a boat; "pull the oars"
row - propel with oars; "row the boat across the lake"
11.pull - rein in to keep from winning a race; "pull a horse"
rein, rein in - stop or check by or as if by a pull at the reins; "He reined in his horses in front of the post office"
12.pull - tear or be torn violently; "The curtain ripped from top to bottom"; "pull the cooked chicken into strips"
rupture, tear, snap, bust - separate or cause to separate abruptly; "The rope snapped"; "tear the paper"
13.pull - hit in the direction that the player is facing when carrying through the swing; "pull the ball"
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
hit - cause to move by striking; "hit a ball"
14.pull - strip of feathers; "pull a chicken"; "pluck the capon"
strip - remove the surface from; "strip wood"
15.pull - remove, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense; "pull weeds"; "extract a bad tooth"; "take out a splinter"; "extract information from the telegram"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
wring out, squeeze out - extract (liquid) by squeezing or pressing; "wring out the washcloth"
demodulate - extract information from a modulated carrier wave
thread - remove facial hair by tying a fine string around it and pulling at the string; "She had her eyebrows threaded"
pull out, draw, get out, pull, take out - bring, take, or pull out of a container or from under a cover; "draw a weapon"; "pull out a gun"; "The mugger pulled a knife on his victim"
16.pull - take sides with; align oneself with; show strong sympathy for; "We all rooted for the home team"; "I'm pulling for the underdog"; "Are you siding with the defender of the title?"
side - take sides for or against; "Who are you widing with?"; "I"m siding against the current candidate"
17.pull - take away; "pull the old soup cans from the supermarket shelf"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
pull out, draw, get out, pull, take out - bring, take, or pull out of a container or from under a cover; "draw a weapon"; "pull out a gun"; "The mugger pulled a knife on his victim"

pull

verb
1. draw, haul, drag, trail, tow, tug, jerk, yank, prise, wrench, lug, wrest I helped pull him out of the water.
draw drive, push, thrust, ram, shove, nudge
2. extract, pick, remove, gather, take out, weed, pluck, cull, uproot, draw out Wes was in the yard pulling weeds when we drove up.
extract plant, insert, implant
3. (Informal) attract, draw, bring in, tempt, lure, interest, entice, pull in, magnetize The organizers have to employ performers to pull a crowd.
attract discourage, deter, repel, put you off
4. strain, tear, stretch, rend, rip, wrench, dislocate, sprain Dave pulled a back muscle and could hardly move.
noun
1. tug, jerk, yank, twitch, heave The tooth must be removed with a firm, straight pull.
tug push, thrust, shove, nudge
2. attraction, appeal, lure, fascination, force, draw, influence, magnetism, enchantment, drawing power, enticement, allurement No matter how much you feel the pull of the past, try to look to the future.
3. force, exertion, magnetism, forcefulness the pull of gravity
4. puff, drag (slang), inhalation He took a deep pull of his cigarette.
5. (Informal) influence, power, authority, say, standing, weight, advantage, muscle, sway, prestige, clout (informal), leverage, kai (N.Z. informal) Using all his pull in parliament, he obtained the necessary papers.
pull a fast one on someone (Informal) trick, cheat, con (informal), take advantage of, sting (informal), deceive, defraud, swindle, bamboozle (informal), hoodwink, take for a ride (informal), put one over on (informal) Someone had pulled a fast one on her over a procedural matter.
pull back withdraw, pull out, retreat, retire, flee, give way, fall back, back off, draw back, disengage, take flight, turn tail, beat a retreat They were asked to pull back from their positions around the city.
pull in draw in, stop, park, arrive, come in, halt, draw up, pull over, come to a halt He pulled in at the side of the road.
pull it off crack it (informal), cut it (informal), do the trick, score a success, secure your object If he had the money, I believe he could pull it off.
pull out (of)
1. withdraw, retire from, abandon, quit, step down from, back out, bow out, stop participating in An injury forced him to pull out of the race.
2. leave, abandon, get out, quit, retreat from, depart, evacuate The militia has agreed to pull out of Beirut.
pull someone in (Brit. slang) arrest, nail (informal), bust (informal), lift (slang), run in (slang), collar (informal), pinch (informal), nab (informal), take someone into custody, feel someone's collar (slang) The police pulled him in for questioning.
pull someone up reprimand, lecture, rebuke, reproach, carpet (informal), censure, scold, berate, castigate, admonish, chastise, tear into (informal), read the riot act to, tell someone off (informal), reprove, upbraid, take someone to task, tick someone off (informal), read someone the riot act, bawl someone out (informal), dress someone down (informal), lambaste, give someone an earful, chew someone out (U.S. & Canad. informal), tear someone off a strip (Brit. informal), haul someone over the coals, give someone a dressing down, give someone a rocket (Brit. & N.Z. informal), slap someone on the wrist, rap someone over the knuckles My boss pulled me up about my timekeeping.
pull something apart or to pieces
1. dismantle, strip down, disassemble, take something apart, break something up, take something to bits You'll have to pull it apart and start all over again.
2. criticize, attack, blast, pan (informal), slam (slang), flame (informal), put down, run down, slate (informal), tear into (informal), lay into (informal), flay, diss (slang, chiefly U.S.), find fault with, lambast(e), pick holes in The critics pulled his new book to pieces.
pull something down demolish, level, destroy, dismantle, remove, flatten, knock down, take down, tear down, bulldoze, raze, lay waste, raze to the ground They'd pulled the school down.
pull something in
1. attract, draw, pull, bring in, lure his ability to pull in a near capacity crowd for a match
2. earn, make, clear, gain, net, collect, be paid, pocket, bring in, gross, take home, rake in I only pull in £15,000 a year as a social worker.
pull something off
1. (Informal) succeed in, manage, establish, effect, complete, achieve, engineer, carry out, crack (informal), fulfil, accomplish, execute, discharge, clinch, bring about, carry off, perpetrate, bring off Labour might just pull off its third victory in a row.
2. remove, detach, rip off, tear off, doff, wrench off He pulled off his shirt.
pull something out produce, draw, bring out, draw out He pulled out a gun and threatened us.
pull something up uproot, raise, lift, weed, dig up, dig out, rip up Pull up weeds by hand and put them on the compost heap.
pull through survive, improve, recover, rally, come through, get better, be all right, recuperate, turn the corner, pull round, get well again Everyone waited to see whether he would pull through or not.
pull up stop, park, halt, arrive, brake, draw up, come to a halt, reach a standstill The cab pulled up and the driver jumped out.
pull yourself together (Informal) get a grip on yourself, recover, get over it, buck up (informal), snap out of it (informal), get your act together, regain your composure He pulled himself together and got back to work.

pull

verb
1. To exert force so as to move (something) toward the source of the force:
2. To remove from a fixed position:
3. Informal. To direct or impel to oneself by some quality or action:
phrasal verb
pull back
To move back in the face of enemy attack or after a defeat:
phrasal verb
pull down
1. To pull down or break up so that reconstruction is impossible:
Aerospace: destruct.
2. Informal. To receive, as wages, for one's labor:
Idioms: earn a living, earn one's keep.
phrasal verb
pull in
1. To come to a particular place:
Slang: blow in.
2. To control, restrict, or arrest:
phrasal verb
pull off
1. Informal. To begin and carry through to completion:
2. Informal. To be responsible for or guilty of (an error or crime):
phrasal verb
pull on
1. To put (an article of clothing) on one's person:
2. To take into the mouth and swallow (a liquid):
Informal: swig, toss down (or off).
Slang: belt.
phrasal verb
pull out
1. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
2. To move back in the face of enemy attack or after a defeat:
phrasal verb
pull through
To exist in spite of adversity:
noun
1. The act of drawing or pulling a load:
2. An inhalation, as of a cigar, pipe, or cigarette:
Slang: hit.
3. An act of drinking or the amount swallowed:
Informal: swig.
Slang: belt.
4. Slang. The power to produce an effect by indirect means:
Informal: clout.
Translations
تأثيرجَذْبجَر، سَحْب، شَد، جَذْبيَجْذِبيُجَذِّف
táhnoutveslovatvjetvlivvtáhnout
trækkedraghiveindflydelsekøre ind
tiri
vetää
izvući
húzmeghúzprotekcióslukk
áhrif, ítökbeygja ; renna af staîkippur; teygur; sogróasjúga
引く
...을 잡아당기다
irkluotiišsikapstytiišsitraukti ginkląištraukti ginkląišvažiuoti
airētbrauktievilktparautpavilkt
izdretiizvlečipodretipotegustaviti se
dradraga
ดึง
kéo

pull

[pʊl]
A. N
1. (= tug) → tirón m, jalón m (LAm); (with oar etc) → golpe m
give the rope a pulltira de la cuerda
suddenly it gave a pullde repente dio un tirón
2. [of moon, magnet, sea etc] → (fuerza f de) atracción f; [of current] → fuerza f, ímpetu m (fig) (= attraction) → atracción f
the pull of the southla atracción del Sur, lo atractivo del Sur
3. (= influence) → enchufe m, palanca f (LAm) ; (= advantage) → ventaja f
he has pull in the right placestiene influencia donde hace falta
they have a pull over us nowahora nos llevan ventaja
he has a slight pulltiene una pequeña ventaja
4. (at pipe, cigarette) → chupada f; (at drink) → trago m
he took a pull at his pipele dio una chupada a la pipa
he took a pull from the bottletomó un trago de la botella, dio un tiento a la botella (Sp)
5. (= journey, drive etc) it was a long pullfue mucho camino or trecho
we had a long pull up the hillnos costó mucho trabajo subir la cuesta
6. (= handle of drawer etc) → tirador m; [of bell] → cuerda f
7. (Typ) → primeras pruebas fpl
8. (Brit) to be on the pullestar de ligue (Sp) , estar chequeando (LAm)
B. VT
1. (= draw, drag) → tirar de, jalar (LAm)
to pull a door shut/opencerrar/abrir una puerta de un tirón or (LAm) jalón
the engine pulls six coachesla locomotora arrastra seis vagones
pull your chair overacerca la silla
his ideas pulled me the same waysus ideas me llevaron por el mismo camino
see also punch A2
see also weight A1
2. (= tug) → tirar de, jalar (LAm); [+ trigger] → apretar; [+ oar] → tirar de; [+ boat] → remar (Naut) [+ rope] → halar, jalar; [+ tooth] → sacar; [+ weeds] → arrancar
to pull sb's hairtirar or (LAm) jalar de los pelos a algn
pull the other one (it's got bells on)!¡cuéntaselo a tu abuela!
see also leg A1
3. (= extract, draw out) → sacar, arrancar; [+ beer] → servir
to pull a gun on sbamenazar a algn con una pistola
see also rank A1
4. (= injure) to pull a musclesufrir un tirón en un músculo
5. [+ ball] (at golf, etc) → golpear oblicuamente (a la izquierda)
6. (Typ) → imprimir
7. (= cancel) [+ TV programme] → suspender
8. (= carry out, do) what are you trying to pull?¿qué quieres conseguir?, ¿qué es lo que pretendes con esto?
to pull a fast one or a trick on sbjugar una mala pasada a algn
9. (= attract) this will really pull the puntersesto seguramente atraerá clientela
he knows how to pull the birds (Brit) → sabe ligar con las chicas
C. VI
1.tirar, jalar (LAm)
to pull at or on a ropetirar de una cuerda
the car is pulling to the rightel coche tira hacia la derecha
the car isn't pulling very wellel coche no tira
2. to pull at or on one's pipedar chupadas a la pipa
to pull at a bottletomar un trago or (Sp) dar un tiento a una botella
3. (= move) [vehicle] → ir; [oarsmen etc] → remar
he pulled sharply to one side to avoid the lorrytorció bruscamente a un lado para no chocar con el camión
the car pulled slowly up the hillel coche subía despacio la cuesta
the train pulled into the stationel tren entró en la estación
he pulled alongside the kerbse acercó al bordillo
it pulled to a stopse paró
we pulled for the shoreremamos hacia la orilla
4. (Brit) → ligar, pillar (cacho) (Sp)
D. CPD pull ring, pull tab Nanilla f
pull about VT + ADV (= handle roughly) → maltratar, manosear
pull ahead VI + ADV (in race etc) → tomar la delantera; (in poll, contest) → ponerse por delante
to pull ahead of sth/sb (in race etc) → tomar la delantera a algo/algn, dejar atrás algo/a algn; (in poll, contest) → ponerse por delante de algo/algn
pull along VT + ADVarrastrar
to pull o.s. alongarrastrarse
pull apart
A. VT + ADV
1. (= separate) → separar; (= take apart) → desmontar
2. (fig) (= search thoroughly) → registrar de arriba abajo, revolver
3. (fig) (= criticize) → deshacer, hacer pedazos
B. VI + ADV they pull apart easilyse separan fácilmente
pull away
A. VT + ADVarrancar, quitar
B. VI + ADV
1. [vehicle] (= move off) → salir, arrancar
he soon pulled away from the others (in race) → pronto dejó atrás a los demás
2. (= draw back) to pull away from sbapartarse bruscamente de algn
3. to pull away at the oarstirar (enérgicamente) de los remos
pull back
A. VT + ADV
1. [+ lever etc] → tirar hacia sí; [+ curtains] → descorrer
2. (Sport) to pull one backremontar un gol
B. VI + ADV
1. (= refrain) → contenerse
2. (Mil) (= withdraw) → retirarse
pull down VT + ADV
1. (= lower) [+ blinds etc] → bajar
he pulled his hat downse caló el sombrero, se encasquetó el sombrero
2. (= cause to fall) [+ person] → hacer caer, tumbar
3. (= demolish) → derribar, demoler (fig) [+ government] → derribar
4. (= weaken) → debilitar
the mark in chemistry pulls her downla nota de química es la que la perjudica or la que le baja la media
5. (US) (= earn) → ganar
pull in
A. VT + ADV
1. [+ claws] → retraer; [+ net] → recoger; [+ rope] → cobrar
2. (= rein in) [+ horse] → sujetar
3. (= attract) [+ crowds] → atraer
the film is pulling them inla película atrae un público numeroso, la película es muy popular
this will pull them inesto les hará venir en masa
4. (= take into custody) → detener
5. (= earn) → ganar
B. VI + ADV (= enter) (into station, harbour) → llegar; (into driveway) → entrar; (= stop, park) → parar
pull off
A. VT + ADV
1. (= remove) → quitar, arrancar; [+ clothes] → quitarse (de prisa)
2. (= cause to succeed) [+ plan etc] → llevar a cabo, conseguir; [+ deal] → cerrar, concluir con éxito
to pull it offlograrlo
B. VI + ADV we pulled off into a lay-by (Aut) → salimos de la carretera y paramos en un apartadero
C. VT + PREP the buses were pulled off the road at onceen seguida los autobuses dejaron de circular
D. VI + PREP we pulled off the road into a lay-bysalimos de la carretera y paramos en un apartadero
pull on VT + ADV [+ gloves etc] → ponerse (de prisa)
pull out
A. VT + ADV
1. (= take out) (from pocket, drawer) → sacar; (from ground) → arrancar; [+ tooth] → sacar, extraer; (= pull outwards) [+ lever etc] → tirar hacia fuera
to pull sb out of a riversacar a algn de un río
to pull sb out of a holesacar a algn de un hoyo (a estirones)
2. (= withdraw) → retirar
everybody was pulled out on striketodos fueron llamados a la huelga
B. VI + ADV
1. (Aut, Rail) (= come out) → salir
the red car pulled out from behind that black oneel coche rojo salió de detrás de aquel negro
he pulled out and disappeared into the trafficarrancó y se perdió en el tráfico
2. (Mil) (= withdraw) → retirarse (from de)
3. (= leave) → salir, partir
we're pulling outnos marchamos ya
4. it pulls out easily [drawer etc] → sale fácilmente
pull over
A. VT + ADV
1. (= bring closer) [+ chair] → acercar
2. (= topple) → volcar
3. (Police) [+ car, driver] → parar
B. VI + ADV (Aut) → hacerse a un lado
pull round
A. VT + ADV to pull sb round [+ unconscious person] → reanimar a algn
B. VI + ADV [unconscious person] → reanimarse, volver en sí
pull through
A. VI + ADV (from illness) → reponerse, recobrar la salud; (from difficulties etc) → reponerse
B. VT + ADV to pull sb through [+ crisis] → sacar a algn del apuro; [+ illness] → ayudar a algn a reponerse
pull together
A. VT + ADV
1. let me pull together the threads of my argumentpermítanme atar los cabos de mi razonamiento
he has pulled the team togethergracias a él los jugadores han recuperado su espíritu de equipo
2. to pull o.s. togethercalmarse, tranquilizarse
pull yourself together!¡cálmate!
B. VI + ADV (fig) (= cooperate) → ir todos a una
pull up
A. VT + ADV
1. (= raise by pulling) → levantar, subir; [+ socks etc] → subir
2. (= bring closer) [+ chair] → acercar
3. (= uproot) → sacar, arrancar
to pull up one's rootsdesarraigarse
4. (= stop) → parar; [+ horse] → refrenar
the police pulled him up for speedingla policía lo paró por sobrepasar el límite de velocidad
5. (= scold) → regañar
6. (= strengthen) → fortalecer
it has pulled the pound upha fortalecido la libra
his mark in French has pulled him upla nota de francés le ha subido la media
B. VI + ADV
1. (= stop) → detenerse, parar (Aut) → parar(se)
2. (= restrain o.s.) → contenerse

pull

[ˈpʊl]
vt
(= tug) [+ rope, hair] → tirer; [+ handle, door] → tirer; [+ cart, carriage] → tirer
Someone pulled her hair → Quelqu'un lui a tiré les cheveux.
to pull a door open → ouvrir une porte en tirant
to pull sth out of sth
She pulled her feet out of the wet boots → Elle retira ses bottes mouillées.
He pulled his arms out of the sleeves → Il sortit ses bras des manches.
to pull sb out of sth
I helped pull him out of the water → J'ai aidé à le sortir de l'eau.
to pull sth to pieces, to pull sth to bits [+ object, toy] → mettre qch en pièces (= criticize) [+ argument, statement, piece of work] → démolir
to pull sb's leg (= tease) → faire marcher qn
You're pulling my leg! → Tu me fais marcher!
pull the other one!, pull the other one, it's got bells on! (British)à d'autres !
to pull strings (= use one's influence) → tirer des ficelles
Can't you pull a few strings and get me a job at your office? → Tu peux tirer quelques ficelles et m'obtenir un travail à ton bureau?
to pull strings for sb (= use one's influence) → intervenir en faveur de qn
to pull one's weight → faire sa part (de travail)
(= close) [+ curtain, blind] → tirer
[+ trigger] → appuyer sur
(= strain) [+ muscle, tendon] → se froisser
I pulled a muscle when I was training → Je me suis froissé un muscle à l'entraînement.
to pull a hamstring → se claquer, se faire un claquage

see face
(= attract) [+ visitors, audience, voters] → attirer
to pull a crowd → attirer les foules
[+ sexual partner] → lever
[+ beer] → tirer
vi (= tug) → tirer
pull! → tirez!
"Pull" (on door)"Tirez"
to pull with all one's strength → tirer de toutes ses forces
n
(PHYSICS) [moon, magnet] → attraction f; [current, gravity] → force f
the pull of gravity → la force de gravité
(fig) [homeland, idea, the past] → attrait m
The idea of living in Paris still had a strong pull → L'idée de vivre à Paris présentait toujours un fort attrait.
the pull of the past → l'attrait du passé
(= tug) to give sth a pull → tirer sur qch
pull about
vt sep (British) (= handle roughly) [+ person] → malmener
pull apart
vt sep
(= separate) → séparer
(= pull to pieces) [+ object, body] → mettre en pièces
(= criticize) [+ argument, statement, piece of work] → démolir
pull away
vi
[vehicle, train] → démarrer; [driver] → s'éloigner
to pull away from sth → s'éloigner de qch
The car pulled away from the kerb → La voiture s'éloigna du trottoir.
(to free o.s, physically)se dégager
to pull away from sb → se dégager de l'étreinte de qn
She pulled away from him → Elle se dégagea de son étreinte.
(= cut one's ties) (mentally)s'éloigner
to pull away from sb → s'éloigner de qn
pull back
vi
(= retreat) [troops] → se retirer
to pull back from [+ position] → se retirer de
(= change one's mind) → faire marche arrière
pull down
vt sep
[+ trousers] → baisser; [+ blind] → baisser
to pull one's skirt down over one's knees → tirer sur sa jupe pour couvrir ses genoux
[+ person] → jeter à terre
His attacker pulled him down → Son assaillant le jeta à terre.
(= demolish) [+ house, building] → démolir; [+ statue] → déboulonner, abattre; [+ tree] → abattre
pull in
vi
(to kerb) [vehicle, driver] → se ranger
[train] (into station)entrer en gare
vt sep
(= attract) [+ visitors, audience, crowd] → attirer
(= pick up, arrest) [+ criminal, suspect] → arrêter
(= earn) [+ money] → se faire
pull off
vt sep
[+ clothes, shoes] → retirer
(= be successful in) [+ deal] → conclure; [+ victory] → arracher
The underdogs pulled off a remarkable victory → Les outsiders ont arraché une remarquable victoire.
to pull it off (= be successful) → réussir son coup
pull out
vi
(from kerb) [vehicle] → démarrer; [person]
She pulled out into the street → Sa voiture s'enfila dans la rue.
(from station) [train] → démarrer
(= change lane) [vehicle] → déboîter
The car pulled out to overtake → La voiture a déboîté pour doubler.
(= withdraw) (from competition, project, agreement)se retirer
to pull out of sth [+ competition, project, agreement] → se retirer de qch
She pulled out of the tournament → Elle s'est retirée du tournoi.
(= withdraw) [troops] → se retirer
to pull out of → se retirer de
vt sep
(= take out) → sortir
She pulled out a gun → Elle sortit un pistolet.
(= extract) [+ tooth] → arracher; [+ cork] → extraire
(= withdraw) [+ athlete] (from competition, training session)retirer
(= withdraw) [+ troops] → retirer
pull over
vi [vehicle, driver] → se ranger
vt sep
(= drag) → tirer
He pulled the table over to the window → Il tira la table jusqu'à la fenêtre.
(= stop) [police] [+ motorist] → contraindre à s'arrêter
pull round
vi
[unconscious person] → revenir à soi
[sick person] → se rétablir
pull through
vi
(from illness)s'en sortir
They think he'll pull through → Ils pensent qu'il va s'en sortir.
(from difficulties)s'en sortir
pull together
vi (= cooperate) → se serrer les coudes
vt sep
to pull o.s. together → se ressaisir
pull up
vi
(= stop) [vehicle] → s'arrêter
A black car pulled up beside me → Une voiture noire s'est arrêtée à côté de moi.
vt sep [+ trousers, socks] → remonter
(= uproot) [+ plant, weed] → arracher
to pull up a chair → prendre une chaise
(= stop) [police] [+ vehicle, driver] → arrêterpull-down menu n (COMPUTING)menu m déroulant

pull

n
(= tug)Ziehen nt; (short) → Ruck m; (lit, fig: = attraction) → Anziehungskraft f; (of current)Sog m; he gave her/the rope a puller zog sie/am Seil; I felt a pull at my sleeveich spürte, wie mich jemand am Ärmel zog; the pull of family ties brought him home againfamiliäre Bande zogen ihn wieder nach Hause; to be on the pull (Brit inf) → auf Mädchen/Männer aus sein
(= uphill journey)Anstieg m
(inf: = influence) → Beziehungen pl(with zu); she has some pull with the managersie kann beim Chef was erreichen (inf); he has pull in the right placeser hat an den richtigen Stellen seine Leute sitzen
(at pipe, beer) → Zug m; he took a pull at his cigarer zog an seiner Zigarre; he took a pull at his glasser nahm einen Schluck aus seinem Glas
(Typ: = proof) → Abzug m
vt
(= draw, drag)ziehen; he pulled the dog behind himer zog den Hund hinter sich (dat)her; to pull a door shuteine Tür zuziehen; he pulled her toward(s) himer zog sie an sich (acc)
(= tug) handle, rope, bellziehen an (+dat); boatrudern; he pulled her hairer zog sie an den Haaren; to pull something to pieces (lit)etw zerreißen, etw in Stücke reißen; (fig: = criticize) → etw verreißen; to pull somebody’s leg (fig inf)jdn auf den Arm nehmen (inf); pull the other one(, it’s got bells on) (Brit inf) → das glaubst du ja selber nicht!, das kannst du deiner Großmutter erzählen! (inf); she was the one pulling the stringssie war es, die alle Fäden in der Hand hielt; to pull rank (on somebody)(jdm gegenüber) den Vorgesetzten herauskehren; to pull one’s punches (fig)sich zurückhalten; when it came to criticizing other people he didn’t pull his or any puncheswenn es darum ging, andere zu kritisieren, zog er ganz schön vom Leder (inf)
(= extract, draw out) tooth, cork(heraus)ziehen; gun, knifeziehen; weeds, lettuceherausziehen; beerzapfen; to pull a gun on somebodyjdn mit der Pistole bedrohen
(= strain) musclesich (dat)zerren; (= tear)thread, ziehen
(= attract) crowdanziehen; (Brit inf: sexually) → rumkriegen (inf); Tim pulled last nightTim hat gestern Nacht eine Frau vernascht (inf); (= had sex)Tim hatte gestern Nacht Sex; a sports car always pulls the girls (inf)mit einem Sportwagen kommt man leichter an die Mädchen ran (inf)
(inf: = carry out, do) dealdurchziehen (inf); (criminal) jobdrehen (inf); what are you trying to pull? (inf)was heckst du wieder aus? (inf); to pull a stuntGeschichten machen
(= cancel) TV programme, concert etcabsagen
(Typ) to pull a proofeinen Abzug machen
(Golf, Cricket, Baseball) → verziehen, auf die der Schlaghand entgegengesetzte Seite schlagen
vi
(= draw)ziehen (→ on, at an +dat); to pull to the left/right (car, brakes)nach links/rechts ziehen; the car/engine isn’t pulling very wellder Wagen/Motor zieht nicht richtig; to pull on one’s cigarettean seiner Zigarette ziehen; to pull for somebody/something (US inf) → jdn/etw unterstützen
(= move: train, car etc) → fahren; the car pulled into the drivewayder Wagen fuhr in die Einfahrt; he pulled across to the left-hand laneer wechselte auf die linke Spur über; he pulled into the next lay-byer fuhr auf den nächsten Halteplatz; he pulled into the kerb/the side of the roader fuhr an den Bordstein heran/an den Straßenrand; to pull alongsideseitlich heranfahren; (Naut) → längsseits kommen; to pull off the roadam Straßenrand anhalten; the oarsmen pulled for or toward(s) the shoredie Ruderer hielten auf das Ufer zu
(Brit inf: sexually) → jemanden rumkriegen (inf)

pull

:
pullback
n (Mil) → Abzug m
pull cord
nZugleine f/-schnur f
pull date
n (US: = eat-by date) → (Mindest)haltbarkeitsdatum nt
pull-down
adj bedKlapp-; pull seatKlappsitz m; pull menu (Comput) → Pull-down-Menü nt

pull

:
pull-out
n
(= withdrawal)Abzug m
(= supplement)heraustrennbarer Teil
attr supplementheraustrennbar; table leaf, seatausziehbar
pullover
nPullover m
pull switch
n (Elec) → Zugschalter m
pull-up
n (Sport) → Klimmzug m

pull

[pʊl]
1. n
a. (tug) → strattone m, tirata, strappo; (of moon, magnet, the sea) → attrazione f (fig) (attraction, of personality) → forza di attrazione; (of family ties) → forza
I felt a pull at my sleeve → ho sentito qualcuno che mi tirava per la manica
to give sth a pull → dare uno strattone a qc
he has some pull with the manager (fam) (influence) → ha dell'influenza sul direttore
b. (at pipe) → boccata, tirata; (at beer) → sorsata
he took a pull at the bottle → ha bevuto un sorso dalla bottiglia
c. (handle of drawer) → maniglia, pomolo; (of bell) → cordone m
2. vt
a. (draw, cart) → tirare, trascinare; (curtains) → tirare (fig) (crowd) → attirare
to pull a door shut/open → chiudere/aprire la porta tirandola
b. (tug, handle, rope) → tirare; (press, trigger) → premere
to pull sb's hair → tirare i capelli a qn
to pull to pieces or to bits (toy) → fare a pezzi (argument) → demolire (person, play) → stroncare
to pull one's punches (Boxing) → risparmiare l'avversario
she didn't pull any punches (fig) → non ha risparmiato nessun colpo
to pull sb's leg → prendere in giro qn
to pull strings (for sb) → muovere qualche pedina (per qn)
to pull one's weight → fare la propria parte, dare il proprio contributo
to pull a face → fare una smorfia
c. (extract, draw out, gen) → togliere; (gun, knife) → tirar fuori; (weeds) → strappare; (leeks, rhubarb) → raccogliere; (beer) → spillare
to pull a gun on sb → estrarre una pistola e puntarla contro qn
d. (tear, thread) → tirare
to pull a muscle → farsi uno strappo musculare
to pull a tendon → farsi uno stiramento
e. (fam) (carry out, do, robbery) → fare
to pull a fast one on sb → combinarla a qn
3. vi
a. (tug) → tirare
to pull at sb's sleeve → tirare qn per la manica
the car is pulling to the right → lo sterzo or la macchina tira a destra
to pull at or on one's pipe → tirare boccate dalla pipa
b. (move) to pull for the shoreremare verso la riva
the train pulled into/out of the station → il treno è entrato in/è partito dalla stazione
he pulled alongside the kerb → ha accostato al marciapiede
we pulled clear of the traffic → ci siamo lasciati il traffico alle spalle
pull about vt + adv (handle roughly, object) → strapazzare; (person) → malmenare
pull along vt + advtrascinare
to pull o.s. along → trascinarsi
pull apart vt + adv
a. (pull to pieces) → smontare; (break) → fare a pezzi, sfasciare; (separate) → separare
b. (fig) (fam) (search thoroughly) → frugare dappertutto in; (criticize, novel, theory) → demolire
pull away
1. vt + advstrappare via
2. vi + adv (move off, vehicle) → muoversi, partire
to pull away from (kerb) → allontanarsi da (quay) → staccarsi da (platform) → muoversi da (subj, runner, competitors) → distanziare
pull back
1. vt + adv (person, lever) → tirare indietro; (curtains) → aprire
2. vi + advtirarsi indietro (Mil) → ritirarsi
pull down vt + adv
a. (gen) → tirar giù; (opponent) → stendere a terra
b. (demolish, buildings) → demolire, buttar giù
pull in
1. vt + adv
a. (rope, fishing line) → tirare su (Naut) (sail) → cazzare; (person, into car, room) → tirare dentro; (stomach) → tirare in dentro
b. (rein in, horse) → trattenere
c. (attract, crowds) → attirare
d. (fam) (take into custody) → mettere dentro
the police pulled him in for questioning → la polizia l'ha fermato per interrogarlo
2. vi + adv (Aut) (arrive) → arrivare; (stop) → fermarsi
pull off vt + adv
a. (remove, wrapping paper) → strappare; (clothes, shoes, gloves) → levarsi, togliersi
b. (fam) (succeed in, plan, attack) → portare a termine
he didn't pull it off → non gli è riuscito il colpo
pull on vt + adv (clothes) → mettersi
pull out
1. vt + adv
a. (take out, tooth, splinter) → togliere; (gun, knife, person) → tirare fuori
b. (withdraw, troops, police) → (far) ritirare
2. vi + adv
a. (withdraw) → ritirarsi
b. (leave, train, car) → uscire
he pulled out to overtake → si è spostato per sorpassare
pull over
1. vt + adv
a. (box, table) pull it over here/theretiralo in qua/in là
pull it over to the window → tiralo vicino alla finestra
b. (topple) → far cascare, tirar giù
2. vi + advaccostare
pull round vi + adv (unconscious person) → rinvenire; (sick person) → ristabilirsi
pull through
1. vt + adv
b. (fig) → aiutare a venirne fuori
2. vi + adv (fig) → cavarsela
pull together
1. vt + adv (fig) to pull o.s. togetherricomporsi
pull yourself together! → datti una mossa
2. vi + adv (make common effort) → cooperare, mettersi insieme
pull up
1. vt + adv
a. (raise by pulling) → tirar su
b. (uproot, weeds) → sradicare
c. (stop, horse, car) → fermare
d. (scold) → riprendere
2. vi + adv (stop) → fermarsi

pull

(pul) verb
1. to (try to) move something especially towards oneself usually by using force. He pulled the chair towards the fire; She pulled at the door but couldn't open it; He kept pulling the girls' hair for fun; Help me to pull my boots off; This railway engine can pull twelve carriages.
2. (with at or on) in eg smoking, to suck at. He pulled at his cigarette.
3. to row. He pulled towards the shore.
4. (of a driver or vehicle) to steer or move in a certain direction. The car pulled in at the garage; I pulled into the side of the road; The train pulled out of the station; The motorbike pulled out to overtake; He pulled off the road.
noun
1. an act of pulling. I felt a pull at my sleeve; He took a pull at his beer/pipe.
2. a pulling or attracting force. magnetic pull; the pull (=attraction) of the sea.
3. influence. He thinks he has some pull with the headmaster.
pull apart / to pieces
to tear or destroy completely by pulling.
pull down
to destroy or demolish (buildings).
pull a face / faces (at)
to make strange expressions with the face eg to show disgust, or to amuse. The children were pulling faces at each other; He pulled a face when he smelt the fish.
pull a gun etc on
to produce and aim a gun etc at (a person).
pull off
to succeed in doing. He's finally pulled it off!
pull on
to put on (a piece of clothing) hastily. She pulled on a sweater.
pull oneself together
to control oneself; to regain one's self-control. At first she was terrified, then she pulled herself together.
pull through
to (help to) survive an illness etc. He is very ill, but he'll pull through; The expert medical treatment pulled him through.
pull up
(of a driver or vehicle) to stop. He pulled up at the traffic lights.
pull one's weight
to take one's fair share of work, duty etc.
pull someone's legleg

pull

يَجْذِب táhnout trække ziehen τραβώ tirar vetää tirer izvući tirare 引く ...을 잡아당기다 trekken trekke pociągnąć puxar тянуть dra ดึง çekmek kéo

pull

n. tirón;
v. tirar, halar, arrancar, sacar;
to ___ intirar hacia adentro;
to ___ oneself togethercalmarse;
to ___ through [as in a sickness]recuperarse;
to ___ up one's kneeslevantar las rodillas.

pull

vt to — a muscle sufrir una distensión (muscular), sufrir un tirón (muscular); He pulled a calf muscle.. Sufrió una distensión (un tirón) en la pantorrilla; pulled muscle distensión f (muscular), tirón m (muscular)
References in classic literature ?
He was a homely man, but they thought his face quite heavenly when he smiled and said, with a fatherly look at them, "Yes, my dears, I think the little girl will pull through this time.
They laughed and began to pull and haul at each other.
I tell them to pull hard and that at the end of the day's journey they will have much rest and refreshment," he translated to Professor Bumper and the others.
All those officers, when they see what I carry under the cloth, pull up their horses and kneel down on the ground in the road until we pass.
I have a big scheme on hand, and want to be on the field proper to pull the ropes and handle the ribbons.
these Frenchers will pull it to pieces faster than it was put together, solid and thick though it be
Because Andrews had a pull he was permitted to sit as an equal among police-court lawyers.
asked Jessie, seating herself comfortably on the table sideways, and endeavoring, to pull her skirt over her little feet.
Pearl laughed, and attempted to pull away her hand.
I had not suspected in advance that her comfortable face would pull me up, and I somehow measured the importance of what I had seen by my thus finding myself hesitate to mention it.
Well, then, pull ahead, and let's get the whale alongside.
When we came to a hill, instead of slackening her pace, she would throw her weight right into the collar, and pull away straight up.