rabbit

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rab·bit

 (răb′ĭt)
n. pl. rab·bits or rabbit
1. Any of various long-eared, short-tailed, burrowing mammals of the family Leporidae, such as the commonly domesticated species Oryctolagus cuniculus, native to Europe and widely introduced elsewhere, or the cottontail of the Americas.
2. A hare.
3. The flesh of a rabbit, used as food.
4. The fur of a rabbit or hare.
5. Sports
a. A competitor who is designated to set a fast pace for a teammate during a long-distance race.
b. A racehorse that is run at a fast pace early in a race in order to tire the favorite so that another horse can take the lead.
c. A mechanical decoy that is propelled around the track in a greyhound race to incite the dogs.
intr.v. rab·bit·ed, rab·bit·ing, rab·bits
To hunt rabbits or hares.

[Middle English rabet, young rabbit, probably from Old French, from Middle Dutch robbe, rabbit.]

rab′bit·er n.

rabbit

(ˈræbɪt)
n, pl -bits or -bit
1. (Animals) any of various common gregarious burrowing leporid mammals, esp Oryctolagus cuniculus of Europe and North Africa and the cottontail of America. They are closely related and similar to hares but are smaller and have shorter ears
2. (Textiles) the fur of such an animal
3. (General Sporting Terms) informal Brit a novice or poor performer at a game or sport
vb
4. (Hunting) (intr) to hunt or shoot rabbits
5. (intr; often foll by on or away) informal Brit to talk inconsequentially; chatter
[(senses 1-4) C14: perhaps from Walloon robett, diminutive of Flemish robbe rabbit, of obscure origin]
[(sense 5) C20: from rhyming slang rabbit and pork talk]

rab•bit

(ˈræb ɪt)

n., pl. -bits, (esp. collectively) -bit.
1. any of several large-eared, hopping lagomorphs of the family Leporidae, usu. smaller than the hares and characterized by bearing blind and furless young in nests.
2. the fur of a rabbit or hare.
[1375–1425; probably < Old North French; compare Walloon robett, dial. Dutch robbe]

rab·bit

(răb′ĭt)
Any of various long-eared, short-tailed mammals that have long hind legs adapted for quick movement by hopping. Rabbits eat mainly plants and dig many-chambered burrows known as warrens. They have been domesticated since ancient times.
hare, rabbit, jackrabbit - Hares live in the open and bear young that have fur at birth, while rabbits live in burrows and bear young that are naked at birth; jackrabbits are hares, not rabbits.
See also related terms for naked.

rabbit


Past participle: rabbited
Gerund: rabbiting

Imperative
rabbit
rabbit
Present
I rabbit
you rabbit
he/she/it rabbits
we rabbit
you rabbit
they rabbit
Preterite
I rabbited
you rabbited
he/she/it rabbited
we rabbited
you rabbited
they rabbited
Present Continuous
I am rabbiting
you are rabbiting
he/she/it is rabbiting
we are rabbiting
you are rabbiting
they are rabbiting
Present Perfect
I have rabbited
you have rabbited
he/she/it has rabbited
we have rabbited
you have rabbited
they have rabbited
Past Continuous
I was rabbiting
you were rabbiting
he/she/it was rabbiting
we were rabbiting
you were rabbiting
they were rabbiting
Past Perfect
I had rabbited
you had rabbited
he/she/it had rabbited
we had rabbited
you had rabbited
they had rabbited
Future
I will rabbit
you will rabbit
he/she/it will rabbit
we will rabbit
you will rabbit
they will rabbit
Future Perfect
I will have rabbited
you will have rabbited
he/she/it will have rabbited
we will have rabbited
you will have rabbited
they will have rabbited
Future Continuous
I will be rabbiting
you will be rabbiting
he/she/it will be rabbiting
we will be rabbiting
you will be rabbiting
they will be rabbiting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been rabbiting
you have been rabbiting
he/she/it has been rabbiting
we have been rabbiting
you have been rabbiting
they have been rabbiting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been rabbiting
you will have been rabbiting
he/she/it will have been rabbiting
we will have been rabbiting
you will have been rabbiting
they will have been rabbiting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been rabbiting
you had been rabbiting
he/she/it had been rabbiting
we had been rabbiting
you had been rabbiting
they had been rabbiting
Conditional
I would rabbit
you would rabbit
he/she/it would rabbit
we would rabbit
you would rabbit
they would rabbit
Past Conditional
I would have rabbited
you would have rabbited
he/she/it would have rabbited
we would have rabbited
you would have rabbited
they would have rabbited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rabbit - any of various burrowing animals of the family Leporidae having long ears and short tailsrabbit - any of various burrowing animals of the family Leporidae having long ears and short tails; some domesticated and raised for pets or food
scut - a short erect tail
leporid, leporid mammal - rabbits and hares
rabbit ears - the long ears of a rabbit
lapin - castrated male rabbit
bunny rabbit, bunny - (usually informal) especially a young rabbit
European rabbit, Old World rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus - common greyish-brown burrowing animal native to southern Europe and northern Africa but introduced elsewhere; widely domesticated and developed in various colors and for various needs; young are born naked and helpless
cottontail, cottontail rabbit, wood rabbit - common small rabbit of North America having greyish or brownish fur and a tail with a white underside; a host for Ixodes pacificus and Ixodes scapularis (Lyme disease ticks)
Belgian hare, leporide - red breed of domestic rabbits; hybrid between Old World rabbit and hare
Angora rabbit, Angora - domestic breed of rabbit with long white silky hair
warren - a colony of rabbits
2.rabbit - the fur of a rabbitrabbit - the fur of a rabbit      
fur, pelt - the dressed hairy coat of a mammal
3.rabbit - flesh of any of various rabbits or hares (wild or domesticated) eaten as food
European rabbit, Old World rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus - common greyish-brown burrowing animal native to southern Europe and northern Africa but introduced elsewhere; widely domesticated and developed in various colors and for various needs; young are born naked and helpless
cottontail, cottontail rabbit, wood rabbit - common small rabbit of North America having greyish or brownish fur and a tail with a white underside; a host for Ixodes pacificus and Ixodes scapularis (Lyme disease ticks)
hare - swift timid long-eared mammal larger than a rabbit having a divided upper lip and long hind legs; young born furred and with open eyes
game - the flesh of wild animals that is used for food
Verb1.rabbit - hunt rabbits
hunt, hunt down, track down, run - pursue for food or sport (as of wild animals); "Goering often hunted wild boars in Poland"; "The dogs are running deer"; "The Duke hunted in these woods"

rabbit

noun buck, doe, bunny rabbit (informal) I caught my first rabbit when I was eight.
rabbit on go on, gas, rattle, gossip, chatter, spout, waffle, drivel, drone on, gab, twitter, ramble on, jabber, gabble, blether What are you rabbiting on about?
Related words
male buck
female doe
collective noun nest
habitation warren

Rabbits and hares

Angora rabbit, arctic hare, Belgian hare, coney or cony, hare, jack rabbit, pika or cony, rabbit or cottontail, snowshoe hare or snowshoe rabbit
Translations
أَرْنَبأرْنَبارنب
králíkžvanit
kanin
kuniklo
kaniinikaniturkispälättääpälpättääjänis
kunić
nyúlüregi nyúl
kelinci
kanína
ウサギ
토끼
cuniculus
triušis
trusis
králik
kuneczajec
kanin
sungura
กระต่าย
con thỏ

rabbit

[ˈræbɪt]
A. N (rabbit or rabbits (pl)) → conejo m
see also Welsh
B. VI to go rabbitingir a cazar conejos
C. CPD rabbit burrow Nmadriguera f
rabbit ears NPL (US) (TV) → antena f de cuernos
rabbit hole Nmadriguera f
rabbit hutch Nconejera f
rabbit punch Ngolpe m de nuca
rabbit warren Nconejera f, madriguera f
rabbit on VI + ADVenrollarse

rabbit

[ˈræbɪt]
n
(= animal) → lapin m
a female rabbit → une lapine
(= meat) → lapin m
vi
to go rabbiting (= hunt rabbits) → aller à la chasse aux lapins
modif [stew, pie] → de lapin; [skin] → de lapin rabbit food, rabbit hole
rabbit away
vi (British)parler à n'en plus finir
rabbit on
vi (British)parler à n'en plus finir
to rabbit on about sth → dégoiser qchrabbit food n (lit)aliments mpl pour lapins (fig) (pejorative)nourriture f pour lapinrabbit hole nterrier m (de lapin) rabbit hutch, rabbit warrenrabbit hutch n
(lit)clapier m
(fig) (= house, flat) → cage f à lapinsrabbit warren n
(lit)garenne f
(fig) (in city, building)labyrinthe m

rabbit

nKaninchen nt; (= fur also)Kanin nt (spec); to behave like a rabbit caught in the headlightsängstlich und überrascht handeln
vi
to go rabbitingKaninchen jagen, auf Kaninchenjagd gehen
(Brit inf: also rabbit on) → quasseln, schwafeln, sülzen (all inf)

rabbit

in cpdsKaninchen-;
rabbit burrow, rabbit hole
nKaninchenbau m
rabbit hutch
rabbit punch
rabbit warren
n
Gänge pldes Kaninchenbaus
(fig: = maze) → Labyrinth nt

rabbit

[ˈræbɪt]
1. nconiglio
doe rabbit → coniglia
2. vi to rabbit (on) (Brit) (fam) → blaterare

rabbit

(ˈrӕbit) noun
a type of small long-eared burrowing animal, found living wild in fields or sometimes kept as a pet.

rabbit

أَرْنَب králík kanin Kaninchen κουνέλι conejo kaniini lapin kunić coniglio ウサギ 토끼 konijn kanin królik coelho кролик kanin กระต่าย tavşan con thỏ 兔子

rabbit

n. conejo-a;
___testprueba del embarazo.
References in periodicals archive ?
This has allowed us to pull a rabbit out of the hat.
We were able to pull a rabbit out of the hat to get this off the ground,'' said Marshall Shrago, president of the Rotary Club of Simi Sunrise, about the special concert.
Even if he has a quiet first 10-15 minutes in a game, you know he is going to pull a rabbit out of the hat somewhere along the line and make a difference because he is just so confident about himself