pull together


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pull

 (po͝ol)
v. pulled, pull·ing, pulls
v.tr.
1. To apply force to (something) so as to cause or tend to cause motion toward the source of the force: pulled her chair up to the table; pulled the wagon down the street.
2. To remove from a fixed position; extract: The dentist pulled the tooth.
3. To tug at; jerk or tweak: I pulled the lever until it broke.
4. To rip or tear; rend: The dog pulled the toy to pieces.
5. To stretch (taffy, for example) repeatedly.
6. To strain (a muscle, for example) injuriously.
7. Informal To attract; draw: a performer who pulls large crowds.
8. Slang To draw out (a weapon) in readiness for use: pull a gun; pulled a knife on me.
9. Informal To remove: pulled the car's engine; pulled the tainted meat product from the stores.
10. Sports To hit (a ball) so that it moves in the direction away from the dominant hand of the player propelling it, as to the left of a right-handed player.
11. Nautical
a. To operate (an oar) in rowing.
b. To transport or propel by rowing.
c. To be rowed by: That boat pulls six oars.
12. To rein in (a horse) to keep it from winning a race.
13. Printing To produce (a print or an impression) from type.
v.intr.
1. To exert force in moving something toward the source of the force: Pull harder and the window will open.
2.
a. To move in a certain direction or toward a certain goal: pulled into the driveway; pulled even with the race leader.
b. To gain a position closer to an objective: Our team has pulled within three points of the league leader.
3. To drink or inhale deeply: pulled on the cold beer with gusto; pull on a cigarette.
4. Nautical To row a boat.
5. Informal To express or feel great sympathy or empathy: We're pulling for our new president.
n.
1. The act or process of pulling: gave the drawer a pull.
2. Force exerted in pulling or required to overcome resistance in pulling: How much pull does this tugboat have?
3. A sustained effort: a long pull across the mountains.
4. Something, such as a knob on a drawer, that is used for pulling.
5. A deep inhalation or draft, as on a cigarette or of a beverage.
6. Slang A means of gaining special advantage; influence: The lobbyist has pull with the senator.
7. Informal The ability to draw or attract; appeal: a star with pull at the box office.
Phrasal Verbs:
pull ahead
To move ahead, as in a race.
pull away
1. To move away or backward; withdraw: The limousine pulled away from the curb.
2. To move ahead of another or others: The horse pulled away and took the lead in the race.
pull back
1. To withdraw or retreat.
2. To reduce one's involvement in a given enterprise.
pull down
1. To demolish; destroy: pull down an old office building.
2. To reduce to a lower level: The bad news pulled down stock prices.
3. To depress, as in spirits or health.
4. Informal To draw (money) as wages: pulls down a hefty salary.
pull in
1. To arrive at a destination: We pulled in at midnight.
2. To obtain, earn, or secure: How much money does he pull in? She pulled in half of the opponent's supporters.
3. To rein in; restrain: pulled in the investigators.
4. To arrest (a criminal suspect, for example).
pull off Informal
To accomplish in spite of difficulties or obstacles; bring off: pulled off a last-minute victory.
pull out
1. To leave or depart: The train pulls out at noon.
2. To withdraw, as from a situation or commitment: After the crash, many Wall Street investors pulled out.
pull over
1. To bring a vehicle to a stop at a curb or at the side of a road: We pulled over to watch the sunset.
2. To force (a motorist or a vehicle) to stop at a curb or at the side of a road: The state trooper pulled the speeding motorist over.
pull round
To restore or be restored to sound health.
pull through
To come or bring successfully through trouble or illness.
pull up
1. To bring or come to a halt: The driver pulled the car up at the curb. The car pulled up in front of the hotel.
2. To approach and arrive at a destination: We watched the plane pull up to the gate.
3. To increase or cause to increase in altitude: The plane pulled up just enough to miss the tower.
4. To advance or regain position, as in a race.
5. To check the action of: The remark pulled him up short.
6. To reprove or rebuke: They were pulled up for wasting money.
7. Basketball To stop one's progress and bring the ball up above one's head in order to take a jump shot.
Idioms:
pull a fast one Informal
To play a trick or perpetrate a fraud.
pull (oneself) together
To regain one's composure.
pull (one's) punches
To refrain from deploying all the resources or force at one's disposal: didn't pull any punches during the negotiations.
pull (one's) weight
To do one's own share, as of work.
pull out all the stops Informal
To deploy all the resources or force at one's disposal: The Inaugural Committee pulled out all the stops when arranging the ceremonies.
pull (someone's) leg
To play a joke on; tease or deceive.
pull something
To carry out a deception or swindle: worried that his partners might be trying to pull something behind his back.
pull strings/wires Informal
To exert secret control or influence in order to gain an end.
pull the plug on Slang
To stop supporting or bring to an end: pulled the plug on the new art courses.
pull the rug (out) from under Informal
To remove all support and assistance from, usually suddenly.
pull the string
Baseball To throw an off-speed pitch.
pull the wool over (someone's) eyes
To deceive; hoodwink.
pull together
To make a joint effort.
pull up stakes
To clear out; leave: She pulled up stakes in New England and moved to the desert.

[Middle English pullen, from Old English pullian.]

pull′er n.
Synonyms: pull, drag, draw, haul, tow1, tug
These verbs mean to cause something to move toward the source of an applied force. Pull is the most general: They pulled the sleds up a hill.
Drag stresses the effort involved in pulling, and also often that the object being moved is trailing along a surface: "His hands were dirty too, and they streaked his face as he dragged his fingers against his cheeks" (Paul Theroux).
Draw can be used to imply movement in a given direction: The teacher drew the children into the room to see the decorations.
Draw can also be used to indicate pulling so as to cover or uncover another object: She draws the curtains so we can see the sunlight.
To haul is to pull an object that is heavy, cumbersome, or otherwise difficult to move: "All three of us roll the drum to the driveway, flattening a strip of knee-high grass, acting like we haul mystery drums every day" (Mark Wisniewski).
Tow means to pull by means of a chain or line: Some cars can tow trailers.
Tug emphasizes repeated and sometimes vigorous pulling: "A strong-willed baby, wide awake and not to be ignored, already reaching out filament fingers to tug at her" (Tana French).
Antonym: push

pull together

vb
1. (intr, adverb) to cooperate or work harmoniously
2. pull oneself together informal to regain one's self-control or composure
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.pull together - assemble or get together; "gather some stones"; "pull your thoughts together"
mobilize, marshal, mobilise, summon - make ready for action or use; "marshal resources"
rake - gather with a rake; "rake leaves"
glean, harvest, reap - gather, as of natural products; "harvest the grapes"
club - gather into a club-like mass; "club hair"
hive - gather into a hive; "The beekeeper hived the swarm"
salvage, scavenge - collect discarded or refused material; "She scavenged the garbage cans for food"
muster, muster up, rally, summon, come up - gather or bring together; "muster the courage to do something"; "she rallied her intellect"; "Summon all your courage"
round up - seek out and bring together; "round up some loyal followers"
cull, pick, pluck - look for and gather; "pick mushrooms"; "pick flowers"
nut - gather nuts
snail - gather snails; "We went snailing in the summer"
birdnest, bird-nest - gather birdnests; "They went birdnesting in the early morning"
nest - gather nests
oyster - gather oysters, dig oysters
sponge - gather sponges, in the ocean
pearl - gather pearls, from oysters in the ocean
clam - gather clams, by digging in the sand by the ocean
shock - collect or gather into shocks; "shock grain"
heap up, stack up, pile up - arrange into piles or stacks; "She piled up her books in my living room"
Translations
se mettre d’accord

w>pull together

vi (lit)gemeinsam ziehen; (= row jointly)im gleichen Takt rudern; (fig: = cooperate) → an einem or am gleichen Strang ziehen
vt sep (fig) political party, members of family etczusammenschweißen; novel etcin einen Zusammenhang bringen; let me now pull together the threads of my argumentlassen Sie mich nunmehr meine Argumentation zusammenfassen
vrsich zusammenreißen
References in classic literature ?
I am Josiah Bounderby, and I had my bringing- up; she's the daughter of Tom Gradgrind, and she had her bringing- up; and the two horses wouldn't pull together.
All hands jumped out into the water, and tried to get the boat off; but as no one dared to give the word, they could not pull together, and their labor was in vain.
Your way at any rate is not my way, and it is unwise that we should attempt any longer to pull together.
You think we ought to wait a while longer, but if we're going to pull together for the rest of our lives why mightn't we just as well begin now?
We're in the same boat, Bunny; we'd better pull together.
pull together sufficient funds to operate, amid fears that it could
Merewyn Sayers, who runs Denby Dale-based business support firm Sayers Solutions, is leading the drive to pull together firms in villages such as Denby Dale, Clayton West, Skelmanthorpe, Scissett, Shepley, High Flatts, Emley and Farnley Tyas.
We have to have a better season next time and pull together to do that.
We must pull together I HAVE to write and tell you about the best article I have read in the Liverpool Echo in along while.
I hope that leaders from across the political and sectarian spectrum will pull together to establish a dialogue to ensure Iraq's political stability and to build a stable future.
We are going to have to pull together like we've never pulled together before.