pulpit


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pul·pit

 (po͝ol′pĭt, pŭl′-)
n.
1. An elevated platform, lectern, or stand used in preaching or conducting a religious service.
2.
a. Clerics considered as a group.
b. The ministry of preaching.
3. An elevated metal guardrail extending around the bow or stern of a yacht or other small vessel.
4. An elevated platform, such as one used by harpooners in a whaling boat.
5. A bully pulpit.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin pulpitum, from Latin, wooden platform.]

pulpit

(ˈpʊlpɪt)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a raised platform, usually surrounded by a barrier, set up in churches as the appointed place for preaching, leading in prayer, etc
2. (Building) any similar raised structure, such as a lectern
3. a medium for expressing an opinion, such as a column in a newspaper
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the pulpit
a. the preaching of the Christian message
b. the clergy or their message and influence
[C14: from Latin pulpitum a platform]

pul•pit

(ˈpʊl pɪt, ˈpʌl-)

n.
1. a platform or raised structure in a church, from which the sermon is delivered or the service is conducted.
2. the pulpit, the clerical profession; ministry.
3. (in small craft)
a. a safety rail rising from the deck near the bow and extending around it.
b. a similar rail at the stern.
4. an elevated control booth in a factory.
[1300–50; Middle English < Late Latin pulpitum pulpit, Latin: platform, stage]

pulpit

- From classical Latin pulpitum, "platform, stage."
See also related terms for platform.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pulpit - a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on itpulpit - a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on it
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"

pulpit

noun platform, stand, podium, rostrum, dais, lectern The minister took his place at the pulpit and preached a fine sermon.
Translations
مِنْبَر الوَعْظ
kazatelna
prædikestol
szószék
predikunarstóll
sakykla
kancele
kazateľnica
prižnica

pulpit

[ˈpʊlpɪt] Npúlpito m

pulpit

[ˈpʊlpɪt] nchaire f

pulpit

nKanzel f

pulpit

[ˈpʊlpɪt] npulpito

pulpit

(ˈpulpit) noun
a raised box or platform in a church, where the priest or minister stands, especially to preach the sermon.
References in classic literature ?
To preach, standing in the pulpit before the people, was always a hardship for him and from Wednesday morning until Saturday evening he thought of nothing but the two sermons that must be preached on Sunday.
Finding the position inconvenient to face Christie, who had seated herself on a chair, he transferred himself to the other side of the ottoman, and addressed her over its back as from a pulpit.
The old clergyman, nurtured at the rich bosom of the English Church, had a long established and legitimate taste for all good and comfortable things, and however stern he might show himself in the pulpit, or in his public reproof of such transgressions as that of Hester Prynne, still, the genial benevolence of his private life had won him warmer affection than was accorded to any of his professional contemporaries.
A hundred black faces turned round in their rows to peer; and beyond, a black Angel of Doom was beating a book in a pulpit.
When the clock began to strike, a burly professor entered, was received with a round of applause, moved swiftly down the center aisle, said "Gentlemen," and began to talk as he climbed his pulpit steps; and by the time he had arrived in his box and faced his audience, his lecture was well under way and all the pens were going.
His pew's right over opposite ourn -- on t'other side the pulpit.
In due course the superintendent stood up in front of the pulpit, with a closed hymn-book in his hand and his forefinger inserted between its leaves, and commanded attention.
Your aunt Sally says he hates to go into the pulpit he's so ashamed; and the people have begun to cool toward him, and he ain't as popular now as he used to was.
The Simpsons' moving was presided over by the village authorities and somewhat anxiously watched by the entire neighborhood, but in spite of all precautions a pulpit chair, several kerosene lamps, and a small stove disappeared from the church and were successfully swapped in the course of Mr.
The man who wields the blood- clotted cowskin during the week fills the pulpit on Sunday, and claims to be a minister of the meek and lowly Jesus.
what a sermon; divided into FOUR HUNDRED AND NINETY parts, each fully equal to an ordinary address from the pulpit, and each discussing a separate sin
The whitewashed walls; the little pews where well-known figures entered with a subdued rustling, and where first one well-known voice and then another, pitched in a peculiar key of petition, uttered phrases at once occult and familiar, like the amulet worn on the heart; the pulpit where the minister delivered unquestioned doctrine, and swayed to and fro, and handled the book in a long accustomed manner; the very pauses between the couplets of the hymn, as it was given out, and the recurrent swell of voices in song: these things had been the channel of divine influences to Marner--they were the fostering home of his religious emotions--they were Christianity and God's kingdom upon earth.