pulpit


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pul·pit

(po͝ol′pĭt, pŭl′-)
n.
1. An elevated platform, lectern, or stand used in preaching or conducting a religious service.
2.
a. Clerics considered as a group.
b. The ministry of preaching.
3. An elevated metal guardrail extending around the bow or stern of a yacht or other small vessel.
4. An elevated platform, such as one used by harpooners in a whaling boat.
5. A bully pulpit.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin pulpitum, from Latin, wooden platform, theatrical stage, possibly back-formation from plural pulpita pulpita, platform, stage, perhaps (via Etruscan *pulputa or *pulpta), from Greek polupoda, neuter plural of polupous, trodden by many feet, having many feet (polu-, many + pous, foot); see polyp.]

pulpit

(ˈpʊlpɪt)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a raised platform, usually surrounded by a barrier, set up in churches as the appointed place for preaching, leading in prayer, etc
2. (Building) any similar raised structure, such as a lectern
3. a medium for expressing an opinion, such as a column in a newspaper
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the pulpit
a. the preaching of the Christian message
b. the clergy or their message and influence
[C14: from Latin pulpitum a platform]

pul•pit

(ˈpʊl pɪt, ˈpʌl-)

n.
1. a platform or raised structure in a church, from which the sermon is delivered or the service is conducted.
2. the pulpit, the clerical profession; ministry.
3. (in small craft)
a. a safety rail rising from the deck near the bow and extending around it.
b. a similar rail at the stern.
4. an elevated control booth in a factory.
[1300–50; Middle English < Late Latin pulpitum pulpit, Latin: platform, stage]

pulpit

- From classical Latin pulpitum, "platform, stage."
See also related terms for platform.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pulpit - a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on itpulpit - a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on it
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"

pulpit

noun platform, stand, podium, rostrum, dais, lectern The minister took his place at the pulpit and preached a fine sermon.
Translations
مِنْبَر الوَعْظ
kazatelna
prædikestol
szószék
predikunarstóll
sakykla
kancele
kazateľnica
prižnica

pulpit

[ˈpʊlpɪt] Npúlpito m

pulpit

[ˈpʊlpɪt] nchaire f

pulpit

nKanzel f

pulpit

[ˈpʊlpɪt] npulpito

pulpit

(ˈpulpit) noun
a raised box or platform in a church, where the priest or minister stands, especially to preach the sermon.
References in classic literature ?
SEEING that his audiences were becoming smaller every Sunday, a Minister of the Gospel broke off in the midst of a sermon, descended the pulpit stairs, and walked on his hands down the central aisle of the church.
The man who wields the blood- clotted cowskin during the week fills the pulpit on Sunday, and claims to be a minister of the meek and lowly Jesus.
In the kind of provincial life which prevails in cities such as this, the Pulpit has great influence.
Then pray tell me where it is,' said Kit, 'for I have come on a pressing matter, and must fetch her out, even if she was in the pulpit.
When the clock began to strike, a burly professor entered, was received with a round of applause, moved swiftly down the center aisle, said "Gentlemen," and began to talk as he climbed his pulpit steps; and by the time he had arrived in his box and faced his audience, his lecture was well under way and all the pens were going.
All my little success in life has been gained in the pulpit.
He longed to speak out from his own pulpit at the full height of his voice, and tell the people what he was.
Yes,' answered I; internally adding, 'and I thought it somewhat derogatory to his dignity as a clergyman to come flying from the pulpit in such eager haste to shake hands with the squire, and hand his wife and daughters into their carriage: and, moreover, I owe him a grudge for nearly shutting me out of it'; for, in fact, though I was standing before his face, close beside the carriage steps, waiting to get in, he would persist in putting them up and closing the door, till one of the family stopped him by calling out that the governess was not in yet; then, without a word of apology, he departed, wishing them good-morning, and leaving the footman to finish the business.
The fact is, the sight of the congregation, when I get into the pulpit, has the same effect upon me that the sight of the footlights has on an actor.
To preach, standing in the pulpit before the people, was always a hardship for him and from Wednesday morning until Saturday evening he thought of nothing but the two sermons that must be preached on Sunday.
Benches; made in the coarsest manner, and entirely with a view to usefulness, were arranged in rows for the reception of the Congregation; while a rough, unpainted box was placed against the wall, in the centre of the length of the apartment, as an apology for a pulpit.
But he never noticed it, because his thoughts were far away, and he walked up the church aisle and into the pulpit, like that.