pulpit

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Related to pulpits: pulpitis

pul·pit

(po͝ol′pĭt, pŭl′-)
n.
1. An elevated platform, lectern, or stand used in preaching or conducting a religious service.
2.
a. Clerics considered as a group.
b. The ministry of preaching.
3. An elevated metal guardrail extending around the bow or stern of a yacht or other small vessel.
4. An elevated platform, such as one used by harpooners in a whaling boat.
5. A bully pulpit.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin pulpitum, from Latin, wooden platform, theatrical stage, possibly back-formation from plural pulpita pulpita, platform, stage, perhaps (via Etruscan *pulputa or *pulpta), from Greek polupoda, neuter plural of polupous, trodden by many feet, having many feet (polu-, many + pous, foot); see polyp.]

pulpit

(ˈpʊlpɪt)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a raised platform, usually surrounded by a barrier, set up in churches as the appointed place for preaching, leading in prayer, etc
2. (Building) any similar raised structure, such as a lectern
3. a medium for expressing an opinion, such as a column in a newspaper
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the pulpit
a. the preaching of the Christian message
b. the clergy or their message and influence
[C14: from Latin pulpitum a platform]

pul•pit

(ˈpʊl pɪt, ˈpʌl-)

n.
1. a platform or raised structure in a church, from which the sermon is delivered or the service is conducted.
2. the pulpit, the clerical profession; ministry.
3. (in small craft)
a. a safety rail rising from the deck near the bow and extending around it.
b. a similar rail at the stern.
4. an elevated control booth in a factory.
[1300–50; Middle English < Late Latin pulpitum pulpit, Latin: platform, stage]

pulpit

- From classical Latin pulpitum, "platform, stage."
See also related terms for platform.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pulpit - a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on itpulpit - a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on it
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"

pulpit

noun platform, stand, podium, rostrum, dais, lectern The minister took his place at the pulpit and preached a fine sermon.
Translations
مِنْبَر الوَعْظ
kazatelna
prædikestol
szószék
predikunarstóll
sakykla
kancele
kazateľnica
prižnica

pulpit

[ˈpʊlpɪt] Npúlpito m

pulpit

[ˈpʊlpɪt] nchaire f

pulpit

nKanzel f

pulpit

[ˈpʊlpɪt] npulpito

pulpit

(ˈpulpit) noun
a raised box or platform in a church, where the priest or minister stands, especially to preach the sermon.
References in classic literature ?
The professors assist them in the saving of their time by being promptly in their little boxed-up pulpits when the hours strike, and as promptly out again when the hour finishes.
Of my walking so proudly and lovingly down the aisle with my sweet wife upon my arm, through a mist of half-seen people, pulpits, monuments, pews, fonts, organs, and church windows, in which there flutter faint airs of association with my childish church at home, so long ago.
Why, it's them that, not content with printin' lies on paper an' preachin' them ou t of pulpits, does want to be cuttin' them on the tombstones.
He was to have exchanged pulpits with Parson Shute, of Westbury; but Parson Shute sent to excuse himself yesterday, being to preach a funeral sermon.
Shallow speakers and shallow thinkers in pulpits and on platforms often talk about the world's worship of pleasure, and whine against it.
What a change has come over our pulpits," Arthur remarked, "since the time when Paley gave that utterly selfish definition of virtue,
Vast trees, standing in the middle of this space, and throwing over it an umbrageous shade, had their massive trunks built round with slight stages, elevated a few feet above the ground, and railed in with canes, forming so many rustic pulpits, from which the priests harangued their devotees.
Among them, quivering to and fro between gloom and splendor, appeared faces that would be seen next day at the council board of the province, and others which, Sabbath after Sabbath, looked devoutly heavenward, and benignantly over the crowded pews, from the holiest pulpits in the land.
Archer and Janey, whenever they alighted at Brown's Hotel, found themselves awaited by two affectionate friends who, like themselves, cultivated ferns in Wardian cases, made macrame lace, read the memoirs of the Baroness Bunsen and had views about the occupants of the leading London pulpits.
Huge columns carved out of single masses of marble, and inlaid from top to bottom with a hundred intricate figures wrought in costly verde antique; pulpits of the same rich materials, whose draperies hung down in many a pictured fold, the stony fabric counterfeiting the delicate work of the loom; the grand altar brilliant with polished facings and balustrades of oriental agate, jasper, verde antique, and other precious stones, whose names, even, we seldom hear-- and slabs of priceless lapis lazuli lavished every where as recklessly as if the church had owned a quarry of it.
The established story of his conversion was familiar on the more puritanic platforms and pulpits, how he had been, when only a boy, drawn away from Scotch theology to Scotch whisky, and how he had risen out of both and become (as he modestly put it) what he was.
That which they hear in schools and pulpits without afterthought, if said in conversation would probably be questioned in silence.