pulpitum


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pulpitum

(ˈpʊlpɪtəm)
n
1. (Architecture) (in many cathedrals and large churches) a stone screen which divides the nave and the choir, often supporting a gallery or loft
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (in many cathedrals and large churches) a stone screen which divides the nave and the choir, often supporting a gallery or loft
[C19: from Latin pulpitum a platform]
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Powerful crosshatched mask-like graphite heads commemorating the disappeared of Chile were visible through the chancel arches, forming both a frame and almost another prison; a clump of sculptures in wood crouched under the ornately budding pulpitum, nakedly wrenched in pain, with a hollowed-out Our Lady of Sorrows expressing starkly the agony of mother Eve as well as Mary, powerless to protect her child.
It has a 21st- century Pulpitum Screen by Alexander Beleschenko, a highly respected glass artist from Swansea, recently installed to much public acclaim
Our tour wandered through the nave, under the 480,000-brick Bell Harry tower, up the stairs and through the high-arched doorway of the pulpitum screen and into the elegant quire, where the church organist was practicing a tricky piece of music that he would be playing at Sunday's services.
Once the environment in which the idea of the aside was first formulated--the open-air theatre of antiquity with its circular seating arrangement and without a linear division between the logeion and the theatron, or even between pulpitum and cavea (Greek and Latin words that correspond, respectively, to the English "stage" and "auditorium")-- is replaced with a more claustrophobic configuration of parterre, loges, and scene (pit, boxes, and stage) separated by a proscenium arch, several of the clauses that make up the original contract between the actors and the audience become irrelevant.