pumping


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pump1
top: jet pump
bottom: centrifugal pump

pump 1

 (pŭmp)
n.
1. A machine or device for raising, compressing, or transferring fluids.
2. Physiology A molecular mechanism for the active transport of ions or molecules across a cell membrane.
3. Physics Electromagnetic radiation used to raise atoms or molecules to a higher energy level.
4. Informal The heart.
5. Informal The place where consumers purchase gasoline. Used with the: gas prices rising at the pump.
v. pumped, pump·ing, pumps
v.tr.
1. To cause to flow by means of a pump or pumplike organ or device: Derricks pumped oil out of the ground. The heart pumps blood throughout the body.
2. To draw, deliver, or pour forth: a writer who pumped out a new novel every year.
3. To propel, eject, or insert: pumped new life into the economy.
4. To cause to move with an up-and-down or back-and-forth motion: a bicyclist pumping the pedals; a piston pumping a shaft.
5. To push or pull (a brake or lever, for instance) rapidly: a driver pumping the brakes.
6. To shoot (bullets, for example) at or into: a gunner pumping rounds at a target.
7. Physics To raise (atoms or molecules) to a higher energy level by exposing them to electromagnetic radiation at a resonant frequency.
8. Physiology To transport (ions or molecules) against a concentration gradient by the expenditure of chemically stored energy.
9. To invest (money) repeatedly or persistently in something.
10. To question closely or persistently: pump a witness for secret information.
11. Informal To promote or publicize vigorously: The company pumped its new product on its website.
v.intr.
1. To operate a pump.
2. To move gas or liquid with a pump or a pumplike organ or device.
3. To move up and down or back and forth in a vigorous manner: My legs were pumping as I ran up the stairs.
4. To flow in spurts: Blood was pumping from the wound.
5. Sports To fake a throw, pass, or shot by moving the arm or arms without releasing the ball.
Phrasal Verb:
pump up
1. To inflate with gas by means of a pump: pump up a tire.
2. Slang To fill with enthusiasm, strength, or energy: The lively debate really pumped us up.
3. Sports To be actively involved in a bodybuilding program: athletes pumping up at the gym.
Idiom:
pump iron Sports
To lift weights.

[Middle English pumpe.]

pump′er n.

pump 2

 (pŭmp)
n.
A shoe that has a closed back and is cut low around the toes, usually with heels and no fastenings.

[Origin unknown.]
Translations

pump·ing

n. bombeo;
heart ______ del corazón;
stomach ______ estomacal.
References in classic literature ?
You must know that in a settled and civilized ocean like our Atlantic, for example, some skippers think little of pumping their whole way across it; though of a still, sleepy night, should the officer of the deck happen to forget his duty in that respect, the probability would be that he and his shipmates would never again remember it, on account of all hands gently subsiding to the bottom.
According to usage they were pumping the ship next morning; and lo
To another room came all the scraps to be "tanked," which meant boiling and pumping off the grease to make soap and lard; below they took out the refuse, and this, too, was a region in which the visitors did not linger.
The hare-lip she got to pumping me about England, and blest if I didn't think the ice was getting mighty thin sometimes.
Miranda Sawyer had a heart, of course, but she had never used it for any other purpose than the pumping and circulating of blood.
There is always sufficient reserve of the ninth ray stored in the great building to maintain the present Martian atmosphere for a thousand years, and the only fear, as my new friend told me, was that some accident might befall the pumping apparatus.
The air was full of the throb and hum of machinery pumping air down the shaft.
I was greatly refreshed by this, and emboldened by the fact that no enquiring tentacle followed the noise of my pumping.
To keep it from filling above a certain level we have four great pumping stations that force the oversupply back into the reservoirs far north from which the red men draw the water which irrigates their farm lands.
Perhaps Aglaya's sisters had merely been pumping Varia for news while pretending to impart information; or perhaps, again, they had been unable to resist the feminine gratification of teasing a friend--for, after all this time, they could scarcely have helped divining the aim of her frequent visits.
The North Atlantic squadron was the sole American force on her eastern shore, it was returning from a friendly visit to France and Spain, and was pumping oil-fuel from tenders in mid-Atlantic--for most of its ships were steamships--when the international situation became acute.
The hotel, where we rejoined our family, lurked behind a group of lofty elms, and we drank at the town pump before it just for the pleasure of pumping it.