punch in


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punch 1

 (pŭnch)
n.
1. A tool for circular or other piercing: a leather punch.
2. A tool for forcing a pin, bolt, or rivet in or out of a hole.
3. A tool for stamping a design on a surface.
4. A tool for making a countersink.
v. punched, punch·ing, punch·es
v.tr.
1. To make (a hole or opening), as by using a punch or similar implement.
2. To make a hole in (something), as by using a punch: The conductor punched my train ticket.
v.intr.
To pierce something; make a hole or opening: My foot punched through the ice.

[Middle English pounce, punche, from Old French poinçon, ponchon; see puncheon1. V., from Middle English pouncen, punchen, to prick, from Old French poinçoner, ponchoner, to emboss with a punch; see punch2.]

punch′er n.

punch 2

 (pŭnch)
tr.v. punched, punch·ing, punch·es
1.
a. To hit with a sharp blow of the fist.
b. To drive (the fist) into or through something.
c. To drive (a ball, for example) with the fist.
d. To make (a hole) by thrusting the fist.
2.
a. Archaic To poke or prod with a stick.
b. Western US To herd (cattle).
3. To depress (the accelerator of a car) forcefully.
4.
a. To depress (a key or button, for example) in order to activate a device or perform an operation: punched the "repeat" key.
b. To enter (data) by keying: punched in the number on the computer.
5. Baseball To hit (a ball) with a quick short swing.
n.
1. A blow with the fist.
2. Impressive or effective force; impact. See Synonyms at vigor.
Phrasal Verbs:
punch in
1. To check in formally at a job upon arrival.
2. To enter data on a keypad or similar device.
punch out
1. To check out formally at a job upon departure.
2. To hit (someone) with a powerful punch, often so as to render unconscious.
3. Baseball To call (a batter) out on a third strike, often using a punching motion as a signal.
punch up
To enliven or enhance: punched up the report by adding some relevant cartoons.
Idioms:
beat to the punch
To make the first decisive move: a marketing team that beat all the competitors to the punch.
punch the clock
1. To register one's arrive or departure at a job.
2. To be employed at a job with regular hours.

[Middle English punchen, to thrust, prod, prick, from Old French poinçonner, ponchonner, to emboss with a punch, from poinçon, ponchon, pointed tool; see puncheon1.]

punch′less adj.

punch 3

 (pŭnch)
n.
A beverage of fruit juices and sometimes a soft drink or carbonated water, often spiced and mixed with a wine or liquor base.

[From Hindi pañc-, five, probably as used in pañcāmr̥t, a mixture of milk, yogurt, ghee, sugar, and honey used in Hindu ritual, from Sanskrit pañcāmṛtam : pañca, five; see penkwe in Indo-European roots + amṛtam, amrita.]

Punch

 (pŭnch)
n.
The quarrelsome hook-nosed husband of Judy in the comic puppet show Punch and Judy.
Idiom:
pleased as Punch
Highly pleased; gratified.

[Short for Punchinello.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.punch in - register one's arrival at work
record, enter, put down - make a record of; set down in permanent form
clock off, clock out, punch out - register one's departure from work
Translations

w>punch in

vt sep
I’ll punch your face in (inf)ich hau dir eine in die Fresse (vulg)or aufs Maul (inf)
(Comput) datatasten, tippen (inf)
References in classic literature ?
For all that he was very courteous and well spoken, made us both sit down with his family to dinner, and brewed punch in a fine china bowl, over which my rascal guide grew so merry that he refused to start.
Yea, verily, hearts alive, we'd brew choice punch in the spread of his spout-hole there, and from that live punch-bowl quaff the living stuff
Saxon saw Punch, the little, rough-coated Skye-terrier with the honest eyes (who had plodded for weary months), gone lame and abandoned; she saw Daisy, the chit of a child, hide Punch in the wagon.