punctuate


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punc·tu·ate

 (pŭngk′cho͞o-āt′)
v. punc·tu·at·ed, punc·tu·at·ing, punc·tu·ates
v.tr.
1. To provide (a text) with punctuation marks.
2. To occur or interrupt periodically: "lectures punctuated by questions and discussions" (Gilbert Highet)."[There is] a great emptiness in America's West punctuated by Air Force bases" (Alfred Kazin).
3. To stress or emphasize.
v.intr.
To use punctuation.

[Medieval Latin pūnctuāre, pūnctuāt-, from Latin pūnctum, point, from neuter past participle of pungere, to prick; see peuk- in Indo-European roots.]

punc′tu·a′tive adj.
punc′tu·a′tor n.

punctuate

(ˈpʌŋktjʊˌeɪt)
vb (mainly tr)
1. (Linguistics) (also intr) to insert punctuation marks into (a written text)
2. to interrupt or insert at frequent intervals: a meeting punctuated by heckling.
3. to give emphasis to
[C17: from Medieval Latin punctuāre to prick, from Latin punctum a prick, from pungere to puncture]
ˈpunctuˌator n

punc•tu•ate

(ˈpʌŋk tʃuˌeɪt)

v. -at•ed, -at•ing. v.t.
1. to mark or divide (something written) with punctuation marks in order to make the meaning clear.
2. to interrupt at intervals: Cheers punctuated the mayor's speech.
3. to give emphasis or force to.
v.i.
4. to insert or use marks of punctuation.
[1625–35; < Medieval Latin pūnctuātus, past participle of pūnctuāre to point, derivative of Latin pūnctus a pricking; see punctual]
punc′tu•a`tor, n.

punctuate

, punctuation - Punctuate—which first meant "point out"—and punctuation are from Latin punctus, "prick, point"; the present-day meaning comes from the insertion of "points" or dots into written texts to indicate pauses (once called "pointing").
See also related terms for insertion.

punctuate


Past participle: punctuated
Gerund: punctuating

Imperative
punctuate
punctuate
Present
I punctuate
you punctuate
he/she/it punctuates
we punctuate
you punctuate
they punctuate
Preterite
I punctuated
you punctuated
he/she/it punctuated
we punctuated
you punctuated
they punctuated
Present Continuous
I am punctuating
you are punctuating
he/she/it is punctuating
we are punctuating
you are punctuating
they are punctuating
Present Perfect
I have punctuated
you have punctuated
he/she/it has punctuated
we have punctuated
you have punctuated
they have punctuated
Past Continuous
I was punctuating
you were punctuating
he/she/it was punctuating
we were punctuating
you were punctuating
they were punctuating
Past Perfect
I had punctuated
you had punctuated
he/she/it had punctuated
we had punctuated
you had punctuated
they had punctuated
Future
I will punctuate
you will punctuate
he/she/it will punctuate
we will punctuate
you will punctuate
they will punctuate
Future Perfect
I will have punctuated
you will have punctuated
he/she/it will have punctuated
we will have punctuated
you will have punctuated
they will have punctuated
Future Continuous
I will be punctuating
you will be punctuating
he/she/it will be punctuating
we will be punctuating
you will be punctuating
they will be punctuating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been punctuating
you have been punctuating
he/she/it has been punctuating
we have been punctuating
you have been punctuating
they have been punctuating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been punctuating
you will have been punctuating
he/she/it will have been punctuating
we will have been punctuating
you will have been punctuating
they will have been punctuating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been punctuating
you had been punctuating
he/she/it had been punctuating
we had been punctuating
you had been punctuating
they had been punctuating
Conditional
I would punctuate
you would punctuate
he/she/it would punctuate
we would punctuate
you would punctuate
they would punctuate
Past Conditional
I would have punctuated
you would have punctuated
he/she/it would have punctuated
we would have punctuated
you would have punctuated
they would have punctuated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.punctuate - insert punctuation marks into
add - make an addition (to); join or combine or unite with others; increase the quality, quantity, size or scope of; "We added two students to that dorm room"; "She added a personal note to her letter"; "Add insult to injury"; "Add some extra plates to the dinner table"
quote - put quote marks around; "Here the author is quoting his colleague"
2.punctuate - to stress, single out as importantpunctuate - to stress, single out as important; "Dr. Jones emphasizes exercise in addition to a change in diet"
background, play down, downplay - understate the importance or quality of; "he played down his royal ancestry"
set off, bring out - direct attention to, as if by means of contrast; "This dress accentuates your nice figure!"; "I set off these words by brackets"
re-emphasise, re-emphasize - emphasize anew; "The director re-emphasized the need for greater productivity"
bear down - pay special attention to; "The lectures bore down on the political background"
evince, express, show - give expression to; "She showed her disappointment"
topicalize - emphasize by putting heavy stress on or by moving to the front of the sentence; "Speakers topicalize more often than they realize"; "The object of the sentence is topicalized in what linguists call `Yiddish Movement'"
point up - emphasize, especially by identification; "This novel points up the racial problems in England"
press home, ram home, drive home - make clear by special emphasis and try to convince somebody of something; "drive home a point or an argument"; "I'm trying to drive home these basic ideas"
emphasise, underline, underscore, emphasize - give extra weight to (a communication); "Her gesture emphasized her words"
3.punctuate - interrupt periodically; "Her sharp questions punctuated the speaker's drone"
cut off, disrupt, interrupt, break up - make a break in; "We interrupt the program for the following messages"

punctuate

verb
1. interrupt, break, pepper, sprinkle, intersperse, interject The silence was punctuated by the distant rumble of traffic.
2. emphasize, mark, stress, underline, accentuate, foreground, point up, lay stress on Moore smiled to punctuate the irony of his comment.

punctuate

verb
To mark with punctuation:
Translations
vyznačit interpunkci
írásjelekkel ellát
nota greinarmerki
dėti skyrybos ženkluspunktuacijaskyrybaskyrybos ženklasskyrybos ženklų dėjimas
likt pieturzīmes
vyznačiť interpunkciu
postavljati ločila
noktalama işaretleri koymaknoktalamak

punctuate

[ˈpʌŋktjʊeɪt] VT (Ling) → puntuar
his speech was punctuated by applauselos aplausos interrumpieron repetidamente su discurso

punctuate

[ˈpʌŋktʃʊeɪt] vt
(= interrupt) → ponctuer
[+ text, letter] → ponctuer

punctuate

vt
(= intersperse)unterbrechen; he punctuated his talk with jokeser spickte seine Rede mit Witzen; a long happy life, punctuated with or by short spells of sadnessein langes glückliches Leben, das zeitweise von traurigen Augenblicken überschattet war
(= emphasize)betonen

punctuate

[ˈpʌŋktjʊˌeɪt] vt (Gram) → mettere la punteggiatura a or in
his speech was punctuated by bursts of applause → il suo discorso fu ripetutamente interrotto da scrosci di applausi

punctuate

(ˈpaŋktʃueit) verb
to divide up sentences etc by commas, full stops, colons etc.
punctuation noun
1. the act of punctuating.
2. the use of punctuation marks.
punctuation mark
any of the symbols used for punctuating, eg comma, full stop, question mark etc.

punctuate

n. puntuar, acto de perforar un tejido con un instrumento afilado.
References in classic literature ?
She did not finish, for by this time she was bending down and punching under the bed with the broom, and so she needed breath to punctuate the punches with.
Jukes took care to punctuate these instructions in proper places with the obligatory "Yes, sir," ejaculated without enthusiasm.
Buzz introduced us to so much: Bob Fosse, straight-ahead jazz, George and Ira Gershwin, and maybe most important of all, an afternoon class of loose-hipped fun to punctuate an otherwise technically demanding day.
Also consistent with the idea of a formal aesthetic laced with cosmic or apocalyptic references are the depictions of industrial plants in Franz Ackermann's acid-bright "mental maps," the images of helicopters that flit across Steve DiBenedetto's painterly encrusted surfaces, and the spacey doodles that punctuate Ati Maier's dense, quasi-naive compositions.
If you've ever been to an Abbey , you will have seen various 'offices' listed; for example vespers and compline, these being only a couple of the monastic hours that punctuate the monastic day.
He is an excellent teacher: often, in quoting from the saint's writings he will punctuate his explanation with phrases such as "this point is vital" or "Let us study these lines carefully.
Success stories, from an Irish pub to a $1,000 kitchen, punctuate the book, proving it can be done with flair.
Punctuate can keep his unbeaten record intact in the Listed Field Marshal Stakes (2.