puncture

(redirected from puncturing)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

punc·ture

 (pŭngk′chər)
v. punc·tured, punc·tur·ing, punc·tures
v.tr.
1. To pierce with a pointed object.
2. To make (a hole) by piercing.
3. To depreciate or deflate: cutting remarks that punctured my ego.
v.intr.
To be pierced or punctured: The tire punctured when it hit the curb.
n.
1. The act or an instance of puncturing.
2. A hole or depression made by a sharp object, especially a hole in an automotive tire.

[From Middle English, a pricking, from Late Latin pūnctūra, from pūnctus, past participle of pungere, to prick; see peuk- in Indo-European roots.]

punc′tur·a·ble adj.

puncture

(ˈpʌŋktʃə)
n
1. a small hole made by a sharp object
2. (Automotive Engineering) a perforation and loss of pressure in a pneumatic tyre, made by sharp stones, glass, etc
3. the act of puncturing or perforating
4. (Automotive Engineering) the act of puncturing or perforating
vb
5. (tr) to pierce (a hole) in (something) with a sharp object
6. (Automotive Engineering) to cause (something pressurized, esp a tyre) to lose pressure by piercing, or (of a tyre, etc) to be pierced and collapse in this way
7. (tr) to depreciate (a person's self-esteem, pomposity, etc)
[C14: from Latin punctūra, from pungere to prick]
ˈpuncturable adj
ˈpuncturer n

punc•ture

(ˈpʌŋk tʃər)

n., v. -tured, -tur•ing. n.
1. the act of piercing or perforating, as with a pointed instrument or object.
2. a hole or mark so made.
v.t.
3. to pierce or perforate, as with a pointed instrument.
4. to make (a hole, perforation, etc.) by piercing or perforating.
5. to reduce or diminish as if by piercing: to puncture a person's pride.
6. to cause to collapse or disintegrate: to puncture one's dream of success.
v.i.
7. to become punctured.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin pūnctūra a pricking =pūnct(us) (past participle of pungere to pierce]

puncture


Past participle: punctured
Gerund: puncturing

Imperative
puncture
puncture
Present
I puncture
you puncture
he/she/it punctures
we puncture
you puncture
they puncture
Preterite
I punctured
you punctured
he/she/it punctured
we punctured
you punctured
they punctured
Present Continuous
I am puncturing
you are puncturing
he/she/it is puncturing
we are puncturing
you are puncturing
they are puncturing
Present Perfect
I have punctured
you have punctured
he/she/it has punctured
we have punctured
you have punctured
they have punctured
Past Continuous
I was puncturing
you were puncturing
he/she/it was puncturing
we were puncturing
you were puncturing
they were puncturing
Past Perfect
I had punctured
you had punctured
he/she/it had punctured
we had punctured
you had punctured
they had punctured
Future
I will puncture
you will puncture
he/she/it will puncture
we will puncture
you will puncture
they will puncture
Future Perfect
I will have punctured
you will have punctured
he/she/it will have punctured
we will have punctured
you will have punctured
they will have punctured
Future Continuous
I will be puncturing
you will be puncturing
he/she/it will be puncturing
we will be puncturing
you will be puncturing
they will be puncturing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been puncturing
you have been puncturing
he/she/it has been puncturing
we have been puncturing
you have been puncturing
they have been puncturing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been puncturing
you will have been puncturing
he/she/it will have been puncturing
we will have been puncturing
you will have been puncturing
they will have been puncturing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been puncturing
you had been puncturing
he/she/it had been puncturing
we had been puncturing
you had been puncturing
they had been puncturing
Conditional
I would puncture
you would puncture
he/she/it would puncture
we would puncture
you would puncture
they would puncture
Past Conditional
I would have punctured
you would have punctured
he/she/it would have punctured
we would have punctured
you would have punctured
they would have punctured

puncture

flat
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.puncture - loss of air pressure in a tire when a hole is made by some sharp objectpuncture - loss of air pressure in a tire when a hole is made by some sharp object
misadventure, mischance, mishap - an instance of misfortune
2.puncture - a small hole made by a sharp object
hole - an opening deliberately made in or through something
pinhole - a small puncture that might have been made by a pin
pinprick - small puncture (as if made by a pin)
3.puncture - the act of puncturing or perforating
activity - any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
centesis - (surgery) the act of puncturing a body cavity or organ with a hollow needle in order to draw out fluid
perforation - the act of punching a hole (especially a row of holes as for ease of separation)
pricking, prick - the act of puncturing with a small point; "he gave the balloon a small prick"
venipuncture - (medicine) puncture of a vein through the skin in order to withdraw blood for analysis or to start an intravenous drip or to inject medication or a radiopaque dye
Verb1.puncture - pierce with a pointed object; make a hole into; "puncture a tire"
scarify - puncture and scar (the skin), as for purposes or tribal identification or rituals; "The men in some African tribes scarify their faces"
pierce - make a hole into; "The needle pierced her flesh"
2.puncture - make by piercing; "puncture a hole"
create, make - make or cause to be or to become; "make a mess in one's office"; "create a furor"
3.puncture - reduce or lessen the size or importance of; "The bad review of his work deflated his self-confidence"
depreciate, vilipend, deprecate - belittle; "The teacher should not deprecate his student's efforts"
4.puncture - cause to lose air pressure or collapse by piercing; "puncture an air balloon"
depressurise, depressurize, decompress - decrease the pressure of; "depressurize the cabin in the air plane"
5.puncture - be pierced or punctured; "The tire punctured"
come apart, break, split up, fall apart, separate - become separated into pieces or fragments; "The figurine broke"; "The freshly baked loaf fell apart"

puncture

noun
1. flat tyre, flat Someone helped me to mend the puncture.
2. hole, opening, break, cut, nick, leak, slit, rupture, perforation an instrument used to make a puncture in the abdominal wall
verb
1. pierce, cut, nick, penetrate, prick, rupture, perforate, impale, bore a hole The bullet punctured his stomach.
2. deflate, go down, go flat The tyre is guaranteed never to puncture.
3. humble, discourage, disillusion, flatten, deflate, take down a peg (informal) a witty column which punctures celebrity egos

puncture

verb
1. To make a hole or other opening in:
2. To pass into or through by overcoming resistance:
3. To cause to be no longer believed or valued:
Informal: shoot down.
Idioms: knock the bottom out of, shoot full of holes.
noun
A small mark or hole made by a sharp, pointed object:
Translations
ثَقْبثَقْب في إطار السَّيّارَهيَثْقُب إطار السَّيّارَه
píchnutípíchnout
punkteringpunktere
reikä
probušena guma
òaî aî springastinga gat á; fá gat á
刺し穴
(찔려서 난) 구멍
pradūrimaspradurta skylėprakiurdintiprakiurti
caurumsdūriensizdurtpārdurt
defekt
luknjapreluknjati
punktering
การเจาะ
patlakpatlatmakufak delikdelik açmak
lỗ thủng

puncture

[ˈpʌŋktʃəʳ]
A. N (in tyre, balloon) → pinchazo m, ponchadura f (Mex); (in skin) → perforación f (Aut) → pinchazo m, ponchadura f (Mex)
I have a puncturese me ha pinchado or (Mex) ponchado un neumático or (esp LAm) una llanta
I had a puncture on the motorwaytuve un pinchazo en la autopista
B. VT [+ tyre] → pinchar, ponchar (Mex); [+ skin] → perforar
this punctured his confidenceesto destruyó su confianza
we'll see if it punctures his prideveremos si esto le baja los humos
C. VIpincharse, poncharse (Mex)

puncture

[ˈpʌŋktʃər]
n (British) (in tyre)crevaison f
I had to mend a puncture → J'ai dû réparer une crevaison.
to have a puncture [driver, cyclist] → crever
I had a puncture on the motorway → J'ai crevé sur l'autoroute. slow puncture
vt
[+ tyre] → crever
[+ lung, skin] → percerpuncture repair kit ntrousse f crevaison, trousse f anticrevaisonpuncture wound nplaie f perforante

puncture

n (in tyre, balloon etc) → Loch nt; (in skin) → (Ein)stich m; (= flat tyre)Reifenpanne f, → Platte(r) m (inf)
vtstechen in (+acc); membranedurchstechen; blisteraufstechen; tyre, balloonLöcher/ein Loch machen in (+acc); prideeinen Stich versetzen (+dat); a punctured lungeine perforierte Lunge
vi (tyre)einen Platten haben (inf); (balloon)platzen; my front tyre puncturedich hatte einen Platten am Vorderrad

puncture

:
puncture needle
n (Med) → Punktionsnadel f
punctureproof
adj tyrenagel-/pannensicher; (Elec) → durchschlagsicher

puncture

[ˈpʌŋktʃəʳ]
1. n (in tyre) → foratura; (in balloon) → foratura, bucatura; (in skin) → puntura
I have a puncture (Aut) → ho forato (una gomma)
2. vtbucare, forare
3. vibucarsi, forarsi

puncture

(ˈpaŋktʃə) verb
to make or get a small hole in. Some glass on the road punctured my new tyre.
noun
a hole in a tyre. My car has had two punctures this week.

puncture

ثَقْب píchnutí punktering Einstich διάτρηση pinchazo reikä crevaison probušena guma foratura 刺し穴 (찔려서 난) 구멍 gaatje punktering przebicie furo прокол punktering การเจาะ patlak lỗ thủng 刺孔

punc·ture

n. punción, perforación;
v. punzar, pinchar; agujerear.

puncture

n punción f, pinchazo, piquete m; lumbar — punción lumbar; vt puncionar, punzar, pinchar, picar
References in classic literature ?
In one hand he held a short slender stick, pointed with a shark's tooth, on the upright end of which he tapped with a small hammer-like piece of wood, thus puncturing the skin, and charging it with the colouring matter in which the instrument was dipped.
Puncturing her tire near Summer Street, and it being mended while she sat very woebegone in that pretty churchyard, she saw to her astonishment, a door open opposite and the younger Emerson man come out.
Now when we are attacked by large flying reptiles we run beneath spreading trees; when land carnivora threaten us, we climb into trees, and we have learned not to fire at any of the dinosaurs unless we can keep out of their reach for at least two minutes after hitting them in the brain or spine, or five minutes after puncturing their hearts--it takes them so long to die.
At first he had tried to keep it in the basement; but the tribe of Silva, loosening the bearings and puncturing the tires, had driven him out.
In the mind's eye of Mr Willet, the West Indies, and indeed all foreign countries, were inhabited by savage nations, who were perpetually burying pipes of peace, flourishing tomahawks, and puncturing strange patterns in their bodies.