punditocracy

pun·di·to·cra·cy

 (pŭn′dĭ-tŏk′rə-sē)
n. pl. pun·di·toc·ra·cies
A group of pundits who wield great political influence.
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the past year, the "mainstream media" punditocracy has sermonized the American people non-stop on the necessity of being more "civil" toward and "tolerant" of those with whom we disagree.
Rather than accept that some existing ACA provisions might make it into a new design, the punditocracy pounced, pointing to a broken campaign promise to repeal and replace.
The late Kevin Barnhurst and his graduate students spent decades meticulously and laboriously documenting changes in journalistic formats, almost always defying common wisdom and the punditocracy.
The punditocracy almost uniformly came down hard on Clinton, recognising the report confirmed she broke federal rules and lied about her conduct.
With two very different populist voter uprisings lifting the presidential candidacies of Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump, one could see Lee as an appropriately fatuous proxy for the out-of-touch punditocracy that failed to predict them, too wrapped up in the inside-baseball shadow plays of finance and politics to realize how profoundly policies and market dips affect real people.
Yet the punditocracy has been predicting Trump's collapse with blind certainty from the very beginning.
Much of the political class jumped to the governor's defense, including a lot of people in politics and the punditocracy who ordinarily disagree with him.
Reviewing the American literature, Dan Nimmo and James Combs define pundit broadly as "one who gives opinion in an authoritative manner" (Nimmo and Combs 1992:xvi), while Alterman proposes the term punditocracy and defines it more narrowly: "The punditocracy is a tiny group of highly visible political pontificators who make their living offering 'inside political opinion and forecasts' in the elite national media.
Yes, ideology matters, but at the end of the day, as Bill Clinton's campaign strategist and an all-time great of American punditocracy once put it, "It's the economy, stupid.
Nevertheless, there is a branch of hope that the governor and her supporters can cling to as the tides of the media punditocracy engulf them.
Immediately the punditocracy weighed in, spinning the results.
Congress, the president, the Court, and much of the punditocracy are complicit in stretching the boundaries of the political and legal systems to impose PPACA on America.