punishing


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pun·ish

 (pŭn′ĭsh)
v. pun·ished, pun·ish·ing, pun·ish·es
v.tr.
1. To subject to a penalty for an offense, sin, or fault.
2. To inflict a penalty for (an offense).
3. To handle or use roughly; damage or hurt: My boots were punished by our long trek through the desert.
v.intr.
To exact or mete out punishment.

[Middle English punissen, punishen, from Old French punir, puniss-, from Latin poenīre, pūnīre, from poena, punishment, from Greek poinē; see kwei- in Indo-European roots.]

pun′ish·a·bil′i·ty n.
pun′ish·a·ble adj.
pun′ish·er n.
Synonyms: punish, chastise, discipline, castigate, penalize
These verbs mean to subject a person to something negative for an offense, sin, or fault. Punish is the least specific: The principal punished the students who were caught cheating. Chastise historically has entailed corporal punishment but now usually involves a verbal rebuke as a means of effecting improvement in behavior: The sarcastic child was roundly chastised for insolence. Discipline stresses punishment inflicted by an authority in order to control or to eliminate unacceptable conduct: The worker was disciplined for insubordination. Castigate means to censure or criticize severely, often in public: The judge castigated the attorney for badgering the witness. Penalize usually implies the forfeiture of money or of a privilege or gain because rules or regulations have been broken: Those who file their income-tax returns late will be penalized.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.punishing - resulting in punishment; "the king imposed a punishing tax"
2.punishing - characterized by effort to the point of exhaustionpunishing - characterized by effort to the point of exhaustion; especially physical effort; "worked their arduous way up the mining valley"; "a grueling campaign"; "hard labor"; "heavy work"; "heavy going"; "spent many laborious hours on the project"; "set a punishing pace"
effortful - requiring great physical effort

punishing

punishing

adjective
Inflicting or aiming to inflict punishment:
Translations

punishing

[ˈpʌnɪʃɪŋ]
A. ADJ [race, schedule] → duro, agotador
B. Ncastigo m (fig) → castigo m, malos tratos mpl
to take a punishingrecibir una paliza; [car, furniture etc] → recibir muchos golpes

punishing

[ˈpʌnɪʃɪŋ]
adj (= exhausting) [schedule, work] → épuisant(e); [speed, pace] → infernal(e)
npunition f

punishing

adj blowhart; routine, pacestrapaziös, tödlich; workloadstrapaziös, erdrückend; to get or take some punishing treatment (cars, furniture) → strapaziert werden; (Sport) → vorgeführt werden (inf), → eins aufs Dach bekommen (inf)
n to take a punishing (inf: team, boxer etc) → vorgeführt werden (inf); he got a real punishing from his opponent (inf)er wurde von seinem Gegner regelrecht vorgeführt (inf); his self-confidence took a punishingsein Selbstbewusstsein litt darunter or bekam einen Knacks (inf)

punishing

[ˈpʌnɪʃɪŋ]
1. adj (fig) (exhausting) → sfiancante
2. npunizione f
References in classic literature ?
He forgot not his words, and did justice, by punishing the offender," said the undaunted daughter.
As the great day approached, all the tyranny that was in him came to the surface; he seemed to take a vin- dictive pleasure in punishing the least shortcomings.
Yet I was glad at first - she deserved punishing for pushing me: but when papa was gone, she made me come to the window and showed me her cheek cut on the inside, against her teeth, and her mouth filling with blood; and then she gathered up the bits of the picture, and went and sat down with her face to the wall, and she has never spoken to me since: and I sometimes think she can't speak for pain.
and though the law may be longer in righting us, and may not be able to right us so completely as you can, there is no doubt of its punishing YOU.
The Queen asked leave to decide what Hadvor's punishment should be, which the King was very willing to allow, so as to escape from punishing his own daughter.
They have here a particular way of punishing adultery; a woman convicted of that crime is condemned to forfeit all her fortune, is turned out of her husband's house, in a mean dress, and is forbid ever to enter it again; she has only a needle given her to get her living with.
Recollect, your worship," said Sancho, "Justice, which is the king himself, is not using force or doing wrong to such persons, but punishing them for their crimes.
There never can be danger that the judges, by a series of deliberate usurpations on the authority of the legislature, would hazard the united resentment of the body intrusted with it, while this body was possessed of the means of punishing their presumption, by degrading them from their stations.
But as new-fangled and artificial treasons have been the great engines by which violent factions, the natural offspring of free government, have usually wreaked their alternate malignity on each other, the convention have, with great judgment, opposed a barrier to this peculiar danger, by inserting a constitutional definition of the crime, fixing the proof necessary for conviction of it, and restraining the Congress, even in punishing it, from extending the consequences of guilt beyond the person of its author.
Speak to the master, madame," said Felton; "happily I am neither charged with the power of pardoning nor punishing.
Again, it much assists a prince to set unusual examples in internal affairs, similar to those which are related of Messer Bernabo da Milano, who, when he had the opportunity, by any one in civil life doing some extraordinary thing, either good or bad, would take some method of rewarding or punishing him, which would be much spoken about.
The confusion spread through the host, so that it seemed scarcely a moment before they were all hacking, hewing, and stabbing at one another, lopping off arms, heads, and legs and doing such memorable deeds that Jason was filled with immense admiration; although, at the same time, he could not help laughing to behold these mighty men punishing each other for an offense which he himself had committed.