punning


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pun

 (pŭn)
n.
A play on words, sometimes on different senses of the same word and sometimes on the similar sense or sound of different words.
intr.v. punned, pun·ning, puns
To make puns or a pun.

[Origin unknown.]

pun′ning·ly adv.

Punning


Obsolete, the act of wordplay; punning. Also called agnomination, annomination.
the state or quality of being ambiguous in meaning or capable of double interpretation. — equivocal, adj.
1. an equivocal term or ambiguous expression.
2. a play upon words; pun.
1. Rhetoric. the use of a word in different senses or the use of words similar in sound for effect, as humor or ambiguity; punning.
2. a pun. — paronomastic, adj.
the study of puns and punning. — punnologist, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.punning - a humorous play on wordspunning - a humorous play on words; "I do it for the pun of it"; "his constant punning irritated her"
fun, sport, play - verbal wit or mockery (often at another's expense but not to be taken seriously); "he became a figure of fun"; "he said it in sport"
References in classic literature ?
I at once looked upon the figure of the animal as a kind of punning or hieroglyphical signature.
As easily as there may be stupidity in a man of genius if you take him unawares on the wrong subject, or as many a man who has the best will to advance the social millennium might be ill-inspired in imagining its lighter pleasures; unable to go beyond Offenbach's music, or the brilliant punning in the last burlesque.
He replied: They are like the punning riddles which are asked at feasts or the children's puzzle about the eunuch aiming at the bat, with what he hit him, as they say in the puzzle, and upon what the bat was sitting.
A member of the editorial board of the journal Oil Shale, one of the most remarkable natural scientists and science managers in the Baltic States, Tallinn University's professor of geoecology Jaan-Mati Punning passed away on November 21, 2009.
For me and my many pun pals, punning is a rewording experience that, like a good steak, can be a rare medium well done.
With this pithy turn of phrase, poet Torquato Neto put forth two of the Brazilian movement's most provocative claims: first, that it provided an ideological alternative to defensive nationalisms, both Left and Right, in late-'60s Brazil; and second, that this alternative was constructed on an aesthetics of punning and resignification, a revaluing of words and positions, a flipping of public platforms into playgrounds that would invert the so-called predicament of Brazil's tropical malaise into a vibrant cultural legacy called Tropicalia.
Pun is defined here after Delabastita (1993: 57) as a phenomenon depending for its existence on the juxtaposition of (at least two) similar/identical forms and (at least two) dissimilar meanings, where, broadly speaking, the subtler the formal contrast and the sharper the semantic one, the finer the punning effect.
But while punning barely features in the repertoire of the modern comedian, Shakespeare still gets away with them.