punt


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punt 1

 (pŭnt)
n.
An open flatbottom boat with squared ends, used in shallow waters and usually propelled by a long pole.
v. punt·ed, punt·ing, punts
v.tr.
1. To propel (a boat) with a pole.
2. To carry in a punt.
v.intr.
To go in a punt.

[Probably Middle English *punt, from Old English punt, from Latin pontō, pontoon, flatbottom boat, from pōns, pont-, bridge; see pent- in Indo-European roots.]

punt′er n.

punt 2

 (pŭnt) Football
n.
A kick in which the ball is dropped from the hands and kicked before it touches the ground.
v. punt·ed, punt·ing, punts
v.tr.
To propel (a ball) by means of a punt.
v.intr.
1. To execute a punt.
2. Informal To cease doing something; give up: Let's punt on this and try something else.

[Perhaps from dialectal punt, to strike, push, perhaps alteration of bunt.]

punt′er n.

punt 3

 (pŭnt)
intr.v. punt·ed, punt·ing, punts
1. Games To lay a bet against the bank, as in roulette.
2. Chiefly British Slang To gamble.

[French ponter, from obsolete pont, past participle of pondre, to put (obsolete), lay an egg, from Old French, to lay an egg, from Latin pōnere; see apo- in Indo-European roots.]

punt′er n.

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punt4

punt 4

 (pŭnt)
n.
The indentation in the bottom of a champagne or wine bottle.

[Perhaps from punty.]

punt

(pʌnt)
n
(Nautical Terms) an open flat-bottomed boat with square ends, propelled by a pole. See quant1
vb
(Nautical Terms) to propel (a boat, esp a punt) by pushing with a pole on the bottom of a river, etc
[Old English punt shallow boat, from Latin pontō punt, pontoon1]

punt

(pʌnt)
n
1. (Soccer) a kick in certain sports, such as rugby, in which the ball is released and kicked before it hits the ground
2. (Rugby) a kick in certain sports, such as rugby, in which the ball is released and kicked before it hits the ground
3. (General Sporting Terms) any long high kick
vb
4. (Soccer) to kick (a ball, etc) using a punt
5. (Rugby) to kick (a ball, etc) using a punt
[C19: perhaps a variant of English dialect bunt to push, perhaps a nasalized variant of butt3]

punt

(pʌnt)
vb
(Gambling, except Cards) (intr) to gamble; bet
n
1. (Gambling, except Cards) a gamble or bet, esp against the bank, as in roulette, or on horses
2. (Gambling, except Cards) Also called: punter a person who bets
3. take a punt at informal Austral and NZ to have an attempt or try at (something)
[C18: from French ponter to punt, from ponte bet laid against the banker, from Spanish punto point, from Latin punctum]

punt

(pʊnt)
n
(Currencies) (formerly) the Irish pound
[Irish Gaelic: pound]

punt1

(pʌnt)

n.
1. a kick, as in football or rugby, executed by dropping the ball and kicking it before it touches the ground.
v.t.
2. to kick (a dropped ball) before it touches the ground.
v.i.
3. to punt a ball.
4. Informal. to equivocate or delay.
[1835–45; compare dial. (Midlands) punt to push, butt]
punt′er, n.

punt2

(pʌnt)
n.
1. a small, shallow, flat-bottomed boat with square ends, propelled by poling.
v.t.
2. to pole (a small boat) along.
3. to convey in a punt.
v.i.
4. to pole a boat along.
5. to travel or have an outing in a punt.
[before 1000; Old English (not attested in Middle English) < Latin pontō punt, pontoon]
punt′er, n.

punt3

(pʌnt)

v.i.
1. to lay a stake against the bank in certain card games, as faro.
2. Slang. to gamble, esp. to bet on sporting events.
[1705–15; < French ponter, derivative of ponte punter, point in faro < Sp punto point]
punt′er, n.

punt4

(pʊnt, pʌnt)

n., pl. punt.
the basic currency of the Republic of Ireland, which has a fixed value relative to the euro.
[1970–75; < Irish < E pound2]

punt

, bunt - Punt, as in "kick," may be from bunt, "push," used in baseball to mean "hit the ball softly."
See also related terms for kick.

kick, punt - The dent in the bottom of a wine or champagne bottle is the kick or punt.
See also related terms for kick.

punt


Past participle: punted
Gerund: punting

Imperative
punt
punt
Present
I punt
you punt
he/she/it punts
we punt
you punt
they punt
Preterite
I punted
you punted
he/she/it punted
we punted
you punted
they punted
Present Continuous
I am punting
you are punting
he/she/it is punting
we are punting
you are punting
they are punting
Present Perfect
I have punted
you have punted
he/she/it has punted
we have punted
you have punted
they have punted
Past Continuous
I was punting
you were punting
he/she/it was punting
we were punting
you were punting
they were punting
Past Perfect
I had punted
you had punted
he/she/it had punted
we had punted
you had punted
they had punted
Future
I will punt
you will punt
he/she/it will punt
we will punt
you will punt
they will punt
Future Perfect
I will have punted
you will have punted
he/she/it will have punted
we will have punted
you will have punted
they will have punted
Future Continuous
I will be punting
you will be punting
he/she/it will be punting
we will be punting
you will be punting
they will be punting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been punting
you have been punting
he/she/it has been punting
we have been punting
you have been punting
they have been punting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been punting
you will have been punting
he/she/it will have been punting
we will have been punting
you will have been punting
they will have been punting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been punting
you had been punting
he/she/it had been punting
we had been punting
you had been punting
they had been punting
Conditional
I would punt
you would punt
he/she/it would punt
we would punt
you would punt
they would punt
Past Conditional
I would have punted
you would have punted
he/she/it would have punted
we would have punted
you would have punted
they would have punted

punt

A ball dropped from the hands and kicked before it touches the ground.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.punt - formerly the basic unit of money in Irelandpunt - formerly the basic unit of money in Ireland; equal to 100 pence
penny - a fractional monetary unit of Ireland and the United Kingdom; equal to one hundredth of a pound
Irish monetary unit - monetary unit in Eire
2.punt - an open flat-bottomed boat used in shallow waters and propelled by a long pole
boat - a small vessel for travel on water
3.punt - (football) a kick in which the football is dropped from the hands and kicked before it touches the groundpunt - (football) a kick in which the football is dropped from the hands and kicked before it touches the ground; "the punt traveled 50 yards"; "punting is an important part of the game"
kick, kicking, boot - the act of delivering a blow with the foot; "he gave the ball a powerful kick"; "the team's kicking was excellent"
football, football game - any of various games played with a ball (round or oval) in which two teams try to kick or carry or propel the ball into each other's goal
Verb1.punt - kick the ball
athletics, sport - an active diversion requiring physical exertion and competition
kick - drive or propel with the foot
2.punt - propel with a pole; "pole barges on the river"; "We went punting in Cambridge"
propel, impel - cause to move forward with force; "Steam propels this ship"
3.punt - place a bet onpunt - place a bet on; "Which horse are you backing?"; "I'm betting on the new horse"
ante - place one's stake
parlay, double up - stake winnings from one bet on a subsequent wager
wager, bet, play - stake on the outcome of an issue; "I bet $100 on that new horse"; "She played all her money on the dark horse"

punt

verb
1. bet, back, stake, gamble, lay, wager He punted the lot on Little Nell in the third race.
noun
1. bet, stake, gamble, wager I like to take the odd punt on the stock exchange.
Translations
زَوْرَقيُسافِر في زَوْرَق
loďkaploutpramice
pram
veto
ladikrúddal hajt
bytta, gaflkænasigla í gaflkænu
plaukti plokščiadugne valtimiplokščiadugnė valtis
plakandibena laivastumt laivu ar kārti
plaviťpreplaviť
altı düz sandalaltı düz sandalla gitmek

punt

1 [pʌnt]
A. N (= boat) → batea f
B. VT [+ boat] → impulsar (con percha); [+ ball] → dar un puntapié a
C. VI to go puntingir a pasear en batea

punt

2 [pʌnt] VI (= bet) → apostar

punt

3 [pʌnt]
A. Npuntapié m de volea
B. VTdar un puntapié de volea a

punt

4 [pʊnt] N (= currency) → libra f (irlandesa)

punt

[ˈpʌnt]
n
(= boat) embarcation plate et allongée, que l'on déplace à l'aide d'une perche
[ˈpʊnt] (Irish) (= Irish currency) → livre f irlandaise
vi (British) (= bet) → parier

punt

1 (esp Brit)
n (= boat)Stechkahn m, → Stocherkahn m
vistaken, stochern; (= go by punt)im Stechkahn fahren; to go puntingStechkahn fahren
vtstaken; (= take by punt)im Stechkahn fahren

punt

2
nSchuss m(aus der Hand); he gave the ball a punter schoss den Ball aus der Hand
vt to punt the ballden Ball aus der Hand schießen; he punted the ball backer schoss den Ball zurück
vi (Rugby) → den Ball aus der Hand schießen

punt

3
n (= bet)Wette f; (= gamble)Spiel nt
viwetten, spielen

punt

4
n (= Irish currency)Punt nt, → irisches Pfund

punt

1 [pʌnt]
1. n (boat) → barchino (Ftbl) → calcio al volo
2. vt (boat) → spingere con la pertica; (ball) → calciare al volo
3. vi to go puntingandare in barchino

punt

2 [pʌnt] n (in Ireland) → sterlina irlandese

punt

(pant) noun
a type of flat-bottomed boat with square ends, moved by pushing against the bottom of the river etc with a pole.
verb
to travel in a punt. They punted up the river.
References in classic literature ?
I suppose he was thinking of the stream we would have presently to cross, on which there was a miserable specimen of a punt, often robbed of its pole.
It enlarges rapidly from a postage-stamp to a playing-card; to a punt and last a pontoon.
Followed the woolly sound of the cable in the hawse-hole; a grunt and squeal of the windlass; a yaw, a punt, and a kick, and the "We're Here" gathered herself together to repeat the motions.
The old soldier ambled up the village street, all shadowy in the dawn, on a punt, scissor-hocked pony.
Dunkeld/, she is a flat-bottomed punt, and going up light as she was, she rolled very heavily.
Stevenson is fast enough, but he couldn't drop from the twenty-five line, and a three-quarter who can't either punt or drop isn't worth a place for pace alone.
They sat on three chairs in the punt, and watched intently their lines.
He was the hero of the punt accident, you remember?
We got into a punt, and went up the stream (with great difficulty), and down the stream (with great ease).
It was an awful sort of fishing, but it no more disconcerted Mr Inspector than if he had been fishing in a punt on a summer evening by some soothing weir high up the peaceful river.
Several small punts and skiffs were lying about in the water and on the edge of the wharf.
He certainly used to stare at it a good deal when keeping us company outside the cabin door, with one muscular arm thrown over the back of the chair, and his big shapely legs, in very tight white trousers, extended far out and ending in a pair of black shoes as roomy as punts.