pure laine


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pure laine

(pjʊə ˈlɛn)
n
(in Quebec) a person belonging to a long-established family of French descent
[French, literally: pure wool]
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of us pure laine types are slow learners, but I would like to think most of us delight in the variety of people God has made and more specifically, has made Presbyterian.
L'association El Mawid, de la commune de Kasr Sbihi, specialisee dans la couture et les arts traditionnels tels que le tissage, la fabrication de tapis en pure laine, les gateaux, l'habillement, les objets de decoration faits a partir de materiaux de recuperation, etc.
The ADQ experience has current echoes in the Coalition Avenir Quebec that competes with the PQ for votes m rural and small-town francophone Quebec where there are few immigrants but many fears of those who are not pure laine.
He attends sessions with a psychoanalyst for which he almost invariably arrives late, teaches English both to peevish refugees and to F61ix, a pure laine Quebecois; he spends increasing amounts of time escorting Esther to her various remedial exercises, joins several dreary political groups in an attempt to ingratiate himself with Maria and leads a predictably unsuccessful attempt to combat the new rack-rent landlords of his apartment building.
WHERE I LIVE up in the north-eastern corner of North America, the term pure laine (literally translated as "pure wool") is used to describe someone who is born in Quebec, francophone (French-speaking), white and directly descended from French European stock.
Despite my own roots, which are white and mostly francophone, I do not use pure laine to describe myself, and the expression makes me a little antsy.
Les << success stories >> mises de l'avant mettent en lumiere les Quebecois pure laine francophones.
Nos gens " sont identifies selon diverses categories : les Quebecois de vieille souche, les nouveaux arrivants, les << pure laine >> et les neo-Quebecois.
He has written about why people who are not pure laine support a unified Canada and oppose separatism: ".
The pure laine, the 'pure wool', as the French call them.
Did we not see ourselves in 1925 as the "pure" and continuing Presbyterians, much as we hear some Separatists speak of themselves as pure laine and continuing Quebecois?
The rhetoric of nationalism began to turn racist as the "old stock" or pure laine majority felt abused by newcomers -- including anglophones who've been resident for generations.