purificatory


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pu·ri·fy

 (pyo͝or′ə-fī′)
tr.v. pu·ri·fied, pu·ri·fy·ing, pu·ri·fies
1. To rid of impurities: purify water.
2. To rid of foreign or objectionable elements: tried to purify the party of its dissenters.
3. To free from moral or spiritual defilement: rituals to purify the soul.

[Middle English purifien, from Old French purifier, from Latin pūrificāre : pūrus, clean; see pure + -ficāre, -fy.]

pu·rif′i·ca·to′ry (pyo͝o-rĭf′ĭ-kə-tôr′ē) adj.
pu′ri·fi′er n.
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purificatory

adjective
Serving to purify of sin:
Translations

purificatory

[ˌpjʊərɪfɪˈkeɪtrɪ] adjpurificatorio/a
References in classic literature ?
In the case of Orestes, for example, there is the madness which led to his capture, and his deliverance by means of the purificatory rite.
Muhsin Qara'ati, a theologian, has commented on these and other related statements, stating that "besides those mentioned already, prevalence of sins, denial of blessings, obstruction of rights, hoarding, oppression and deception, abandonment of the enjoining of good and the forbidding of evil, non-payment of zakat (obligatory purificatory tax), are sometimes the reason for the absence of rain.
But this idea also introduces the notion that the Dhamma, as an intellectual artifact, has a purificatory quality to it the effect of which transforms nearby beings for the better.
The introduction covers Olympiodorus' life and society; philosophical excellence and the philosophical curriculum; pre-philosophical excellence: (1) natural and (2) habituated; philosophical excellence: (3) civic, (4) purificatory, and (5) contemplative; excellence beyond philosophy: (6) exemplary, and (7) inspired; the Platonic curriculum and the Alcibiades: from natural gifts to civic responsibility; and Olympiodorus' lectures On the Alcibiades.
These frequently required banishment from the community and expiatory sacrifices as part of the purificatory process.
29) On the Athenian Dekate and its purificatory role after childbirth, see, e.
Such familiar procedures as the use of magical formulas and purificatory baths, or the elicitation of oracular dreams by sleeping in the temple precincts, can only have had a curative effect by psychical means.
For despite the desire that rational discourse be undertaken in a spirit of calm and order, modern western rationality bears within it the marks of a purificatory fervor.
In similar vein, the abandonment of the purificatory observances and concerns with pollution is rendered as 'the demise of disciplinary relationships among bodies, land and ancestors has resulted in contemporary discourses about bodies that are no longer under control' (p.
Ian Harris's article then points out that Cambodia's border obsession and xenophobia over neighbours' invading Khmer territory 'contain strongly exorcistic and purificatory dimensions deriving from indigenous religious categories'.
An example would be if someone should pray to the gods, who excise the effect of matter and cause the stains that come from the [process of] birth to vanish, while he himself with the help of the purificatory virtues is especially engaged in this.
This results in Job's protest against God, his purificatory oath ("Reinigungseid") and his challenging speech ("Herausforderungsrede").