puritan


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Related to puritan: Puritan Revolution

Pu·ri·tan

 (pyo͝or′ĭ-tn)
n.
1. A member of a group of English Protestants who in the 1500s and 1600s advocated strict religious discipline along with simplification of the ceremonies and creeds of the Church of England.
2. puritan A person who is very strict or austere in religious practice or moral outlook, especially someone who regards pleasure or luxury as sinful.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the Puritans or Puritanism.
2. puritan Characteristic of a puritan; puritanical.

[From Late Latin pūritās, purity (on the model of Medieval Latin Kathari, "the Pure Ones," a third-century sect of rigorist heretics), from Latin pūrus, pure; see peuə- in Indo-European roots.]

puritan

(ˈpjʊərɪtən)
n
a person who adheres to strict moral or religious principles, esp one opposed to luxury and sensual enjoyment
adj
characteristic of a puritan
[C16: from Late Latin pūritās purity]
ˈpuritanˌism n

Puritan

(in the late 16th and 17th centuries ˈpjʊərɪtən)
n
1. (Protestantism) any of the more extreme English Protestants, most of whom were Calvinists, who wished to purify the Church of England of most of its ceremony and other aspects that they deemed to be Catholic
2. (Historical Terms) any of the more extreme English Protestants, most of whom were Calvinists, who wished to purify the Church of England of most of its ceremony and other aspects that they deemed to be Catholic
adj
3. (Historical Terms) of, characteristic of, or relating to the Puritans
4. (Protestantism) of, characteristic of, or relating to the Puritans
ˈPuritanˌism n

Pu•ri•tan

(ˈpyʊər ɪ tn)

n.
1. a member of a group of Protestants that arose in the 16th century within the Church of England, demanding the simplification of doctrine and worship and greater strictness in religious discipline.
2. (l.c.) a person who is strict in moral or religious matters.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Puritans.
4. (l.c.) puritanical.
[1540–50; < Late Latin pūrit(ās) purity]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Puritan - a member of a group of English Protestants who in the 16th and 17th centuries thought that the Protestant Reformation under Elizabeth was incomplete and advocated the simplification and regulation of forms of worship
Protestant - an adherent of Protestantism
2.puritan - someone who adheres to strict religious principlespuritan - someone who adheres to strict religious principles; someone opposed to sensual pleasures
abstainer, ascetic - someone who practices self denial as a spiritual discipline
3.puritan - a person excessively concerned about propriety and decorum
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable

puritan

noun
1. moralist, fanatic, zealot, prude, pietist, rigorist He delighted in dealing with subjects that enraged puritans.
adjective
1. strict, austere, puritanical, narrow, severe, intolerant, ascetic, narrow-minded, moralistic, prudish, hidebound, strait-laced Paul has always had a puritan streak.
Quotations
"The Puritan hated bear-baiting, not because it gave pain to the bear, but because it gave pleasure to the spectators" [Lord Macaulay History of England]

puritan

noun
A person who is too much concerned with being proper, modest, or righteous:
Informal: old maid.
Translations
بيوريتاني: مُتَزَمِّت في أمور الدّينمُتَزَمِّت ، مُتَشَدِّد
-kapuritán
asketpuritaner
puritán
púrítanipúrítani, siîavandur/strangtrúaîur maîur
puritonaspuritoniškas
puritānis
puritán
Püritensofta/bağnaz kimse

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən]
A. ADJpuritano
B. Npuritano/a m/f

Puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən] n (RELIGION)puritain(e) m/f

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən] n (= puritanical person) → puritain(e) m/f

puritan

(Rel: also Puritan)
adjpuritanisch
nPuritaner(in) m(f)

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtn] adj & npuritano/a

puritan

(ˈpjuəritən) noun
1. a person who is strict and disapproves of many kinds of enjoyment.
2. formerly, in England and America, a member of a religious group wanting to make church worship etc simpler and plainer.
ˌpuriˈtanical (-ˈtӕ-) adjective
References in classic literature ?
A natural spring of soft and pleasant water--a rare treasure on the sea-girt peninsula where the Puritan settlement was made--had early induced Matthew Maule to build a hut, shaggy with thatch, at this point, although somewhat too remote from what was then the centre of the village.
But, in that early severity of the Puritan character, an inference of this kind could not so indubitably be drawn.
One does not find out what a hold the chalet has taken upon him, until he presently comes upon a new house-- a house which is aping the town fashions of Germany and France, a prim, hideous, straight-up-and-down thing, plastered all over on the outside to look like stone, and altogether so stiff, and formal, and ugly, and forbidding, and so out of tune with the gracious landscape, and so deaf and dumb and dead to the poetry of its surroundings, that it suggests an undertaker at a picnic, a corpse at a wedding, a puritan in Paradise.
After encouraging the idea of the play, they declined the personal sacrifice of acting in it -- or, they accepted characters, and then broke down in the effort to study them -- or they volunteered to take the parts which they knew were already engaged, and declined the parts which were waiting to be acted -- or they were afflicted with weak constitutions, and mischievously fell ill when they were wanted at rehearsal -- or they had Puritan relatives in the background, and, after slipping into their parts cheerfully at the week's beginning, oozed out of them penitently, under serious family pressure, at the week's end.
Raveloe lay low among the bushy trees and the rutted lanes, aloof from the currents of industrial energy and Puritan earnestness: the rich ate and drank freely, accepting gout and apoplexy as things that ran mysteriously in respectable families, and the poor thought that the rich were entirely in the right of it to lead a jolly life; besides, their feasting caused a multiplication of orts, which were the heirlooms of the poor.
Once it was the Puritan Fathers who left our coasts," he is recorded to have said; "nowadays it is our Prodigal Sons.
As for the lives of one's neighbours, if one wishes to be a prig or a Puritan, one can flaunt one's moral views about them, but they are not one's concern.
If you will interpret the word INTOLERANCE as FIRMNESS OF PRINCIPLE, if you do not wish to condemn in the catholic soul of the Abbe de Sponde the stoicism which Walter Scott has made you admire in the puritan soul of Jeanie Deans' father; if you are willing to recognize in the Roman Church the Potius mori quam foedari that you admire in republican tenets,--you will understand the sorrow of the Abbe de Sponde when he saw in his niece's salon the apostate priest, the renegade, the pervert, the heretic, that enemy of the Church, the guilty taker of the Constitutional oath.
Athos was a gentleman, punctilious in points of honor; and there were in the plan which our lover had devised for Milady, he was sure, certain things that would not obtain the assent of this Puritan.
He wore the old Puritan dress, a dark cloak and a steeplecrowned hat, in the fashion of at least fifty years before, with a heavy sword upon his thigh, but a staff in his hand to assist the tremulous gait of age.
One of the vessels in the fleet was that same Mayflower which had carried the Puritan Pilgrims to Plymouth.
Do you know, I don't believe in the existence of Puritan women?