puritan


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Related to puritan: Puritan Revolution

Pu·ri·tan

 (pyo͝or′ĭ-tn)
n.
1. A member of a group of English Protestants who in the 1500s and 1600s advocated strict religious discipline along with simplification of the ceremonies and creeds of the Church of England.
2. puritan A person who is very strict or austere in religious practice or moral outlook, especially someone who regards pleasure or luxury as sinful.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the Puritans or Puritanism.
2. puritan Characteristic of a puritan; puritanical.

[From Late Latin pūritās, purity (on the model of Medieval Latin Kathari, "the Pure Ones," a third-century sect of rigorist heretics), from Latin pūrus, pure; see peuə- in Indo-European roots.]

puritan

(ˈpjʊərɪtən)
n
a person who adheres to strict moral or religious principles, esp one opposed to luxury and sensual enjoyment
adj
characteristic of a puritan
[C16: from Late Latin pūritās purity]
ˈpuritanˌism n

Puritan

(in the late 16th and 17th centuries ˈpjʊərɪtən)
n
1. (Protestantism) any of the more extreme English Protestants, most of whom were Calvinists, who wished to purify the Church of England of most of its ceremony and other aspects that they deemed to be Catholic
2. (Historical Terms) any of the more extreme English Protestants, most of whom were Calvinists, who wished to purify the Church of England of most of its ceremony and other aspects that they deemed to be Catholic
adj
3. (Historical Terms) of, characteristic of, or relating to the Puritans
4. (Protestantism) of, characteristic of, or relating to the Puritans
ˈPuritanˌism n

Pu•ri•tan

(ˈpyʊər ɪ tn)

n.
1. a member of a group of Protestants that arose in the 16th century within the Church of England, demanding the simplification of doctrine and worship and greater strictness in religious discipline.
2. (l.c.) a person who is strict in moral or religious matters.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Puritans.
4. (l.c.) puritanical.
[1540–50; < Late Latin pūrit(ās) purity]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Puritan - a member of a group of English Protestants who in the 16th and 17th centuries thought that the Protestant Reformation under Elizabeth was incomplete and advocated the simplification and regulation of forms of worship
Protestant - an adherent of Protestantism
2.puritan - someone who adheres to strict religious principlespuritan - someone who adheres to strict religious principles; someone opposed to sensual pleasures
abstainer, ascetic - someone who practices self denial as a spiritual discipline
3.puritan - a person excessively concerned about propriety and decorum
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable

puritan

noun
1. moralist, fanatic, zealot, prude, pietist, rigorist He delighted in dealing with subjects that enraged puritans.
adjective
1. strict, austere, puritanical, narrow, severe, intolerant, ascetic, narrow-minded, moralistic, prudish, hidebound, strait-laced Paul has always had a puritan streak.
Quotations
"The Puritan hated bear-baiting, not because it gave pain to the bear, but because it gave pleasure to the spectators" [Lord Macaulay History of England]

puritan

noun
A person who is too much concerned with being proper, modest, or righteous:
Informal: old maid.
Translations
بيوريتاني: مُتَزَمِّت في أمور الدّينمُتَزَمِّت ، مُتَشَدِّد
-kapuritán
asketpuritaner
puritán
púrítanipúrítani, siîavandur/strangtrúaîur maîur
puritonaspuritoniškas
puritānis
puritán
Püritensofta/bağnaz kimse

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən]
A. ADJpuritano
B. Npuritano/a m/f

Puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən] n (RELIGION)puritain(e) m/f

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən] n (= puritanical person) → puritain(e) m/f

puritan

(Rel: also Puritan)
adjpuritanisch
nPuritaner(in) m(f)

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtn] adj & npuritano/a

puritan

(ˈpjuəritən) noun
1. a person who is strict and disapproves of many kinds of enjoyment.
2. formerly, in England and America, a member of a religious group wanting to make church worship etc simpler and plainer.
ˌpuriˈtanical (-ˈtӕ-) adjective
References in classic literature ?
One of the vessels in the fleet was that same Mayflower which had carried the Puritan Pilgrims to Plymouth.
He wore a black cloak, called a Geneva cloak, and had a black velvet cap, fitting close to his head, as was the fashion of almost all the Puritan clergymen.
Come, come, calm yourself, Madame Puritan, or I'll remove you to a dungeon.
Milady's supper was brought in, and she was found deeply engaged in saying her prayers aloud--prayers which she had learned of an old servant of her second husband, a most austere Puritan.
James decided that the religion of England must be Episcopal, but as the reign of James went on, England became more and more Puritan and the breach between King and people grew wide, for James was no Puritan nor was Charles after him.
Puritan ideas drew the great mass of thinking people.
The way was therefore opened to the four friends with all sorts of Puritan congratulations.
He wore the old Puritan dress, a dark cloak and a steeplecrowned hat, in the fashion of at least fifty years before, with a heavy sword upon his thigh, but a staff in his hand to assist the tremulous gait of age.
A party of Indians -- in their savage finery of curiously embroidered deerskin robes, wampum-belts, red and yellow ochre, and feathers, and armed with the bow and arrow and stone-headed spear -- stood apart with countenances of inflexible gravity, beyond what even the Puritan aspect could attain.
A natural spring of soft and pleasant water--a rare treasure on the sea-girt peninsula where the Puritan settlement was made--had early induced Matthew Maule to build a hut, shaggy with thatch, at this point, although somewhat too remote from what was then the centre of the village.
Once it was the Puritan Fathers who left our coasts," he is recorded to have said; "nowadays it is our Prodigal Sons.
For now, while so quietly Lying, it fancies A holier odor About it, of pansies -- A rosemary odor, Commingled with pansies -- With rue and the beautiful Puritan pansies.