pursuit


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pur·suit

 (pər-so͞ot′)
n.
1. The act or an instance of chasing or pursuing: the pursuit of the suspect by the police.
2. The act of striving to gain or accomplish something: the pursuit of wealth; the pursuit of higher education.
3. An activity, such as a vocation or hobby, engaged in regularly.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman pursuite, from pursure, to pursue; see pursue.]

pursuit

(pəˈsjuːt)
n
1.
a. the act of pursuing, chasing, or striving after
b. (as modifier): a pursuit plane.
2. (Other Non-sporting Hobbies) an occupation, hobby, or pastime
3. (Cycle Racing) (in cycling) a race in which the riders set off at intervals along the track and attempt to overtake each other
[C14: from Old French poursieute, from poursivre to prosecute, pursue]

pur•suit

(pərˈsut)

n.
1. the act of pursuing.
2. an effort to secure or attain; quest.
3. an occupation or pastime one regularly engages in: literary pursuits.
[1300–50; Middle English < Anglo-French purseute « Vulgar Latin *prōsequita for Latin prōsecūta, feminine of prōsecūtus, past participle of prōsequī to pursue; compare suit]

pursuit

  • dachshund - German for "badger hound," from its original breeding purpose to pursue a badger (etc.) that has taken refuge in a burrow.
  • invite - Comes from Latin invitare, from an Indo-European root meaning "to go after something, pursue with vigor, desire."
  • logology - The pursuit of word puzzles; also the science of words.
  • sue - From Latin sequi, "follow," it first meant "follow, go in pursuit of."

pursuit

An offensive operation designed to catch or cut off a hostile force attempting to escape, with the aim of destroying it.

Pursuit

 
  1. (He was) after her like a hound after a deer —Harriet Beecher Stowe
  2. (He was) after it like a duck on a June bug —American colloquialism, attributed to the South

    A twist on the duck/bug comparison is to be after something, “Like a pet coon into the churn.”

  3. (He was) after it like the stink after onion —American colloquialism, attributed to the South
  4. Chased him like a fox chases a turkey —Rosa Guy
  5. Chased me … like a kid after a fire truck —Irwin Shaw
  6. Follow after me like an old weasel tracing a rat —John M. Synge

    In Synge’s script for The Playboy of the Western World, ‘weasel’ was spelled with the letter z.

  7. Follow each other like lemmings over the cliffs of Dover —Richard Hicks, about discount book sellers, Publishers’ Weekly, 1986
  8. Follow every lead like a lawyer building a case —Anon
  9. Followed her about like a little dog —William Makepeace Thackeray
  10. Followed him like a trained sleuth —Shelby Hearon
  11. Followed one another like insects going at dawn through the heavy grass —Eudora Welty
  12. Follow you around like flies —Gavin Lyall
  13. Haunted me like a passion —William Wordsworth
  14. Held on his trail like an old hound after his last coon —James Crumley
  15. Hounded him like bailiffs —Oakley Hall
  16. Looked for … like a bird looking for forage in a desert —Arthur A. Cohen
  17. Pursue as wolves pursue sheep —William Reese, a rare book dealer, quoted in Wall Street Journal article on how book collectors go after their finds, May 6, 1986
  18. [A disease] pursued him like a hobgoblin —Maurice Edelman
  19. Pursue as a male dog goes after a bitch in heat —Anon
  20. Pursuing him like a nemesis, like an unwanted, embarrassing relative —Donald McCaig
  21. Slivered after him like mercury —Wilfrid Sheed
  22. Sniff out like a terrier smells a rat —Basil Blackwell
  23. Tagging along [behind character in story] like an anthropologist tags along behind his Indian —Deborah Eisenberg
  24. Trailing … like a cape before a bull —Lawrence Durrell
  25. Trotting behind like a penny dog —Rita Mae Brown
  26. Will run him down like a greyhound catching a hare —George Garrett
  27. Would be on my back like a bad case of sunburn —Shelby Hearon
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pursuit - the act of pursuing in an effort to overtake or capturepursuit - the act of pursuing in an effort to overtake or capture; "the culprit started to run and the cop took off in pursuit"
movement, move, motion - the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path"
tracking, trailing - the pursuit (of a person or animal) by following tracks or marks they left behind
shadowing, tailing - the act of following someone secretly
stalking, stalk - the act of following prey stealthily
2.pursuit - a search for an alternative that meets cognitive criteriapursuit - a search for an alternative that meets cognitive criteria; "the pursuit of love"; "life is more than the pursuance of fame"; "a quest for wealth"
wild-goose chase - the fruitless pursuit of something unattainable
search - the examination of alternative hypotheses; "his search for a move that would avoid checkmate was unsuccessful"
3.pursuit - an auxiliary activitypursuit - an auxiliary activity    
pastime, pursuit, interest - a diversion that occupies one's time and thoughts (usually pleasantly); "sailing is her favorite pastime"; "his main pastime is gambling"; "he counts reading among his interests"; "they criticized the boy for his limited pursuits"
spelaeology, speleology - the pastime of exploring caves
4.pursuit - a diversion that occupies one's time and thoughts (usually pleasantly)pursuit - a diversion that occupies one's time and thoughts (usually pleasantly); "sailing is her favorite pastime"; "his main pastime is gambling"; "he counts reading among his interests"; "they criticized the boy for his limited pursuits"
diversion, recreation - an activity that diverts or amuses or stimulates; "scuba diving is provided as a diversion for tourists"; "for recreation he wrote poetry and solved crossword puzzles"; "drug abuse is often regarded as a form of recreation"

pursuit

noun
1. quest, seeking, search, aim of, aspiration for, striving towards individuals in pursuit of their dreams the pursuit of happiness
2. pursuing, seeking, tracking, search, hunt, hunting, chase, trail, trailing Police had obstructed justice by hindering the pursuit of terrorists.
3. occupation, activity, interest, line, pleasure, hobby, pastime, vocation They both love outdoor pursuits.

pursuit

noun
1. The following of another in an attempt to overtake and capture:
2. An attempting to accomplish or attain:
3. Activity pursued as a livelihood:
Slang: racket.
Archaic: employ.
4. A working at a profession or occupation:
Translations
مُتابَعَه، مُواصَلَهمُطارَدَه، مُلاحَقَهمُلاحَقَةُ
činnostsnahasnaženístíhání
=-beskæftigelsebeskæftigelseforfølgelselige i hælene
takaa-ajo
težnja
elfoglaltságtevékenységtörekvésűzés
eftirförstarf, iîja
追跡
추적
zasledovanje
förföljelse
การพยายามให้ถึงความต้องการ
kovalamakovalamacapeşine düşmeuğraş
sự theo đuổi

pursuit

[pəˈsjuːt]
A. N
1. (= chase) → caza f, persecución f (fig) [of pleasure, happiness, knowledge] → busca f, búsqueda f
the pursuit of wealthel afán de riqueza
in (the) pursuit of sth/sben busca de algo/algn
to set out in pursuit of sbsalir en busca de algn
with two policemen in hot pursuitcon dos policías pisándole los talones
2. (= occupation) outdoor pursuitsactividades fpl al aire libre
literary pursuitsintereses mpl literarios, actividades fpl literarias
leisure pursuitspasatiempos mpl
B. CPD pursuit plane Navión m de caza

pursuit

[pərˈsjuːt] n
(= seeking) the pursuit of sth [+ happiness, pleasure, excellence] → la quête de qch, la poursuite de qch
in pursuit of sth [+ happiness, pleasure] → en quête de qch
(= following) [person, car, animal] → poursuite f
in pursuit of sb/sth [+ person, car, animal] → à la poursuite de qn/qch
with sb in hot pursuit → avec qn sur ses talons, avec qn à ses trousses
to be in hot pursuit of sb → talonner qn
Rangers are in hot pursuit of Bayern Munich and Valencia → Les Rangers talonnent le Bayern et Valence.
(= pastime) → passe-temps m inv (= occupation) → activité f
leisure pursuits → activités de loisirs
outdoor pursuits → activités de plein air
scientific pursuits → recherches fpl scientifiques

pursuit

n
(= act of pursuing) (of person)Verfolgung f (→ of +gen), → Jagd f (→ of auf +acc); (of knowledge)Streben nt(of nach), Trachten nt(of nach); (of pleasure)Jagd f(of nach); (of happiness)Streben nt(of nach); he set off in pursuit (of her)er rannte/fuhr (ihr) hinterher; to go in pursuit of somebody/somethingsich auf die Jagd nach jdm/etw machen; hot pursuit (Mil) → Nacheile f; in hot pursuit of somebodyhart auf jds Fersen (dat); to set off/be in hot pursuit of somebody/somethingjdm/einer Sache nachjagen; in hot pursuit of the thiefin wilder Jagd auf den Dieb; in (the) pursuit of his goalin Verfolgung seines Ziels; Kissinger’s pursuit of peaceKissingers Friedensbemühungen pl
(= occupation)Beschäftigung f; (= hobby, pastime)Freizeitbeschäftigung f, → Zeitvertreib m; his literary pursuitsseine Beschäftigung mit der Literatur
(Sport: also pursuit race) → Verfolgungsrennen nt

pursuit

[pəˈsjuːt] n
a. (chase) → inseguimento (fig) (of pleasure, happiness, knowledge) → ricerca
in (the) pursuit of sb → all'inseguimento di qn
in (the) pursuit of sth → alla ricerca di qc
with two policemen in hot pursuit → con due poliziotti alle calcagna
b. (occupation) → attività f inv, occupazione f; (pastime) → svago, passatempo
scientific pursuits → ricerche fpl scientifiche

pursue

(pəˈsjuː) verb
1. to follow especially in order to catch or capture; to chase. They pursued the thief through the town.
2. to occupy oneself with (studies, enquiries etc); to continue. He is pursuing his studies at the University.
purˈsuer noun
pursuit (pəˈsjuːt) noun
1. the act of pursuing. The thief ran down the street with a policeman in (hot) pursuit.
2. an occupation or hobby. holiday pursuits.

pursuit

مُلاحَقَةُ snaha forfølgelse Verfolgung καταδίωξη persecución takaa-ajo poursuite težnja inseguimento 追跡 추적 nastreven forfølgelse pościg perseguição преследование förföljelse การพยายามให้ถึงความต้องการ kovalamaca sự theo đuổi 追逐
References in classic literature ?
because we never meant when we constructed the State, that the opposition of natures should extend to every difference, but only to those differences which affected the pursuit in which the individual is engaged; we should have argued, for example, that a physician and one who is in mind a physician may be said to have the same nature.
Two years passed in this manner, during which I paid no visit to Geneva, but was engaged, heart and soul, in the pursuit of some discoveries which I hoped to make.
An hour or so after I started in leisurely pursuit.
A tremendous howl was heard from the Arabs, but, completely engrossed by the pursuit, they had not taken notice of the balloon, which was now but five hundred paces behind them, and only about thirty feet from the ground.
When he had rested and bound up his wounded leg he started on in pursuit of the drifting canoe.
In the same degree as Cornelius de Witt had excited the hatred of the people by sowing those evil seeds which are called political passions, Van Baerle had gained the affections of his fellow citizens by completely shunning the pursuit of politics, absorbed as he was in the peaceful pursuit of cultivating tulips.
For however eagerly and impetuously the savage crew had hailed the announcement of his quest; yet all sailors of all sorts are more or less capricious and unreliable --they live in the varying outer weather, and they inhale its fickleness --and when retained for any object remote and blank in the pursuit, however promissory of life and passion in the end, it is above all things requisite that temporary interests and employment should intervene and hold them healthily suspended for the final dash.
Thus, the pursuit of Hector would be ludicrous if placed upon the stage--the Greeks standing still and not joining in the pursuit, and Achilles waving them back.
A festive winter Conversion of the Shoshonies Visit of two free trappers Gayety in the camp A touch of the tender passion The reclaimed squaw An Indian fine lady An elopement A pursuit Market value of a bad wife.
As we drew nearer the barrier cliffs and no sign of rescuing Sarians appeared Ghak became both angry and alarmed, and presently as the sound of rapidly approaching pursuit fell upon our ears, he called to me over his shoulder that we were lost.
In the first place, then, this gentleman just arrived was no other person than Squire Western himself, who was come hither in pursuit of his daughter; and, had he fortunately been two hours earlier, he had not only found her, but his niece into the bargain; for such was the wife of Mr Fitzpatrick, who had run away with her five years before, out of the custody of that sage lady, Madam Western.
I had already encountered some of these creatures,-- once during my moonlight flight from the Leopard-man, and once during my pursuit by Moreau on the previous day.