push polling


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push polling

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the use of loaded questions in a supposedly objective telephone opinion poll during a political campaign in order to bias voters against an opposing candidate
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PENNSYLVANIA: Americans in Contact PAC (AICPAC) was linked in the past to push polling and potentially illegal robocalls.
PUSH POLLING -- asking voters questions designed to spread negative information about a candidate rather than to elicit voters' views -- is a despicable technique.
The result of this lens is that we have a sophisticated understanding of the intricacies of media buying, push polling, the techniques of consultants, the nuances of ad-making, and other tactical considerations.
Lobbyists to fund weeks of lies, negative attacks and push polling, career politician Trey Grayson has been unable to gain traction.
I sincerely regret that Relational, in pursuit of its own agenda, appears intent on bothering you with telephone calls from political operatives and manipulative push polling tactics.
The scale and telephone technology of push polling are new; the concept itself, and the depths to which it can descend, unfortunately are not.
But the legislators listed here are recounting what random citizens and supporters told them or their staff after push polling.
Bennett learned of the push polling from a constituent named Scott Landry of Wilton, Maine.
Of the 45 candidates for the 104th Congress we interviewed, fully 34 (almost 80 percent) claimed that push polling was used against them.
The most extreme use of anti-gay push polling came in a number of congressional contests around the country, where heterosexual Democratic candidates were "revealed" as gay or lesbian in last-minute negative persuasion calls.
They have engaged in massive push polling, questionable research, hiring of political hacks and flaks, run phone banks, distributed incorrect information, and generally run a campaign to turn citizens against their elected officials," said Ken Hays, Kinsey's Chief of Staff.