pyrexia


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Related to pyrexia: Pyrexia of unknown origin

py·rex·i·a

 (pī-rĕk′sē-ə)
n.
Fever.

[New Latin, from Greek purexis, from puressein, to have a fever, from puretos, fever; see pyretic.]

py·rex′i·al, py·rex′ic adj.

pyrexia

(paɪˈrɛksɪə)
n
(Pathology) a technical name for fever
[C18: from New Latin, from Greek purexis, from puressein to be feverish, from pur fire]
pyˈrexial, pyˈrexic adj

fe•ver

(ˈfi vər)

n.
1. an abnormally high body temperature.
2. any of various diseases in which high temperature is a prominent symptom, as scarlet fever or rheumatic fever.
3. intense nervous excitement: in a fever of anticipation.
v.t.
4. to affect with or as if with fever.
v.i.
5. to become feverish; have or get a fever.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English fefer < Latin febris fever]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pyrexia - a rise in the temperature of the bodypyrexia - a rise in the temperature of the body; frequently a symptom of infection
symptom - (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease
hyperpyrexia - extremely high fever (especially in children)
Translations

py·rex·i·a

n. pirexia, condición febril.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patient incidence of grade 3 or higher treatment-emergent AEs was 82 percent, most commonly febrile neutropenia (27 percent), thrombocytopenia (22 percent), anemia (16 percent), pyrexia (11 percent) and neurologic events (7 percent).
2 percent of patients were febrile neutropenia, pneumonia, immune thrombocytopenia, tumor lysis syndrome, diarrhea, fluid overload, hyperglycemia, prostate cancer, pyrexia, upper respiratory tract infection, and viral upper respiratory tract infection.
On admission to tertiary care, an aetiological differential diagnosis for the pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) [1] (Table 2) included retropharyngeal abscess, Lemierre's syndrome, HIV seroconversion, and adult onset Still's disease (AOSD).
Normal temperature was recorded using digital thermometer and then pyrexia was induced in all animals by injecting 20% aqueous suspension of Brewer's yeast (10 ml/kg s.
The most frequent adverse reactions reported in clinical trials and as spontaneous reports are diarrhoea, immune reconstitution syndrome, nausea, pyrexia and rash.
Coverage includes an introduction to medical diagnosis; critical illness; cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and neurological presentations; miscellaneous presentations such as frequency of micturition, hematuria, joint pain or swelling, back pain, pyrexia of unknown origin, anemia, and skin rash; and biochemical abnormalities.
The most common adverse events re ported in patients treated with entecavir through 48 weeks were peripheral edema (16%), ascites (15%), pyrexia (14%), hepatic encephalopathy (10%), and up per respiratory infection (10%), according to the company statement.
The most commonly observed symptoms of infusion-related reactions were: headache, dizziness, hypotension, hypertension, nausea, fatigue/asthenia, and pyrexia.
In the appropriate clinical setting, however, US can be a vital tool in the assessment of patients with abdominal symptoms and in patients with an unexplained pyrexia in whom the chest X-ray is normal and sputum examination for acid-fast bacilli is negative.
A genus of the order Febres, class Pyrexia, of Cullen's nosology" (J.
The conditions included hepatitis, tuberculosis and pyrexia - fever of an unknown cause.