pyroxene


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py·rox·ene

 (pī-rŏk′sēn′)
n.
Any of a group of crystalline silicate minerals common in igneous and metamorphic rocks and containing two metallic oxides, as of magnesium, iron, calcium, sodium, or aluminum.

[French pyroxène : Greek puro-, pyro- + Greek xenos, stranger (originally viewed as a foreign substance when found in igneous rocks); see ghos-ti- in Indo-European roots.]

py′rox·en′ic (pī′rŏk-sē′nĭk, -sĕn′ĭk) adj.

pyroxene

(paɪˈrɒksiːn)
n
(Minerals) any of a group of silicate minerals having the general formula ABSi2O6, where A is usually calcium, sodium, magnesium, or iron, and B is usually magnesium, iron, chromium, manganese, or aluminium. Pyroxenes occur in basic igneous rocks and some metamorphic rocks, and have colours ranging from white to dark green or black. They may be monoclinic (clinopyroxenes) or orthorhombic (orthopyroxenes) in crystal structure. Examples are augite (the most important pyroxene), diopside, enstatite, hypersthene, and jadeite
[C19: pyro- + -xene from Greek xenos foreign, because it was mistakenly thought to have originated elsewhere when found in igneous rocks]
pyroxenic adj

py•rox•ene

(paɪˈrɒk sin, pə-, ˈpaɪ rɒkˌsin)

n.
any of a group of silicate minerals whose silica tetrahedra are arranged in single chains, usu. with ions of magnesium, iron, and calcium in between, and that constitute many igneous rocks.
[1790–1800; < French; see pyro-, xeno-; orig. conjectured to be a foreign substance when found in igneous rocks]
py`rox•en′ic (-ˈsɛn ɪk) adj.

py·rox·ene

(pī-rŏk′sēn′)
Any of a series of rock-forming minerals consisting of mixtures of calcium, sodium, magnesium, or iron silicates. Pyroxenes vary in color from white to dark green or black and are characterized by a rectangular-shaped cross section. They occur in igneous and metamorphic rocks.

pyroxene

Any of a group of rock-forming silicate minerals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pyroxene - any of a group of crystalline silicate mineral common in igneous and metamorphic rocks
mineral - solid homogeneous inorganic substances occurring in nature having a definite chemical composition
nephelinite - an igneous rock consisting of nepheline and pyroxene
basalt - the commonest type of solidified lava; a dense dark grey fine-grained igneous rock that is composed chiefly of plagioclase feldspar and pyroxene
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Outcropping pegmatites characterised by coarse crystalline spodumene (a lithium rich pyroxene mineral and the preferred feedstock of hard-rock lithium mining projects).
Subhi Nasr, Director of Earth Science Research Centre at Sultan Qaboos University, says that when the peridotite rock - made up mostly of silicate minerals olivine and pyroxene - reacts with carbon dioxide, it converts the gas into calcite, a solid mineral.
The scientists infer that late in the magma-ocean crystallization, iron-rich pyroxene and ilmenite, which formed late and at the crust-mantle boundary, might have begun to sink, and early-formed magnesium-rich olivine might have begun to rise.
Barker's study revealed three main rock types within what he interpreted to be a composite pluton: (1) fine-grained, leucocratic syenite that contains limited amounts of Na-rich pyroxene (aegirineaugite) and amphibole (riebeckite-arfvedsonite) with no nepheline or quartz; (2) medium- to coarse- grained, magnetite-bearing biotite syenite that similarly contains no nepheline or quartz; and (3) coarse-grained, foliated, biotite nepheline syenite that includes the "type variety" of litchfieldite described by Bayley (1892) and the rock type that is found in most petrologic collections (shown in Figure 2).
Basalt fibres are the fibres made of extremely fine fibres of basalt, comprising the minerals pyroxene, plagioclase and olivine, having better physicomechanical properties than fiberglass, and significantly economical than carbon fibre.
Moon rock analysis has identified quantities of pyroxene, feldspar, olivine and ilmenite.
the country rock) in close proximity to the intrusions has been fenitized to varying degrees, producing quartz syenite, alkali syenite, nepheline syenite, pyroxene nephelinite, microcline syenite and albite syenite.
11): 1) the distribution of most trace elements is controlled by minerals crystallised from the residual interstitial liquid (amphibole, phlogopite and other accessory phases), excepting the HREE, that are significantly incorporated in pyroxene (~30-50%), and Ba and LREE in plagioclase (~10-30%); 2) HREE are largely controlled by amphibole, 3) LILE are mainly incorporated into phlogopite (Rb, Ba) and plagioclase (Ba), 4) Nb-Ta demonstrate a clear preference for amphibole, phlogopite and one accessory mineral (likely ilmenite), and 5) many incompatible trace elements seem to be predominantly controlled by accessory phases present in modal proportion below 1 %: LREE (apatite) and Th-U and Zr-Hf (zircon and baddeleyite) (Fig.
These help complete removal of viruses, bacteria, pyroxene and most the organic compounds, said the expert mentioning that water is finally disinfected through ozonation and ultraviolet system.
The results of petrographic observations (IQ-B1, IQ-B2, B3-IQ, IQ-B4) shows the mineral content, as follows: olivine (20%-35%), pyroxene (5%-20%), Minerals opaque (5%), a mass basis (40%-70%), the name: peridotite (Figure 2).