quaint

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Related to quainter: subtle

quaint

 (kwānt)
adj. quaint·er, quaint·est
1. Charmingly odd, especially in an old-fashioned way: "Sarah Orne Jewett ... was dismissed by one critic as merely a New England old maid who wrote quaint, plotless sketches of late 19th-century coastal Maine" (James McManus).
2. Archaic Unfamiliar or unusual in character; strange: quaint dialect words.
3. Archaic Cleverly made or done.

[Middle English queinte, cointe, clever, cunning, peculiar, from Old French, clever, from Latin cognitus, past participle of cognōscere, to learn; see cognition.]

quaint′ly adv.
quaint′ness n.

quaint

(kweɪnt)
adj
1. attractively unusual, esp in an old-fashioned style: a quaint village.
2. odd, peculiar, or inappropriate: a quaint sense of duty.
[C13 (in the sense: clever): from Old French cointe, from Latin cognitus known, from cognoscere to ascertain]
ˈquaintly adv
ˈquaintness n

quaint

(kweɪnt)

adj. -er, -est.
1. having an old-fashioned charm; oddly picturesque: a quaint old house.
2. peculiar or unusual in an interesting or amusing way: a quaint sense of humor.
3. skillfully or cleverly made.
4. Obs. wise; skilled.
[1175–1225; Middle English queinte < Old French, variant of cointe clever, pleasing « Latin cognitus known (past participle of cognōscere; see cognition)]
quaint′ly, adv.
quaint′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.quaint - strange in an interesting or pleasing way; "quaint dialect words"; "quaint streets of New Orleans, that most foreign of American cities"
strange, unusual - being definitely out of the ordinary and unexpected; slightly odd or even a bit weird; "a strange exaltation that was indefinable"; "a strange fantastical mind"; "what a strange sense of humor she has"
2.quaint - very strange or unusual; odd or even incongruous in character or appearance; "the head terminating in the quaint duck bill which gives the animal its vernacular name"- Bill Beatty; "came forth a quaint and fearful sight"- Sir Walter Scott; "a quaint sense of humor"
strange, unusual - being definitely out of the ordinary and unexpected; slightly odd or even a bit weird; "a strange exaltation that was indefinable"; "a strange fantastical mind"; "what a strange sense of humor she has"
3.quaint - attractively old-fashioned (but not necessarily authentic); "houses with quaint thatched roofs"; "a vaulted roof supporting old-time chimney pots"
fashionable, stylish - being or in accordance with current social fashions; "fashionable clothing"; "the fashionable side of town"; "a fashionable cafe"

quaint

adjective
1. unusual, odd, curious, original, strange, bizarre, fantastic, old-fashioned, peculiar, eccentric, queer, rum (Brit. slang), singular, fanciful, whimsical, droll When visiting restaurants, be prepared for some quaint customs.
unusual normal, ordinary
2. old-fashioned, charming, picturesque, antique, gothic, old-world, antiquated Whisky-making is treated as a quaint cottage industry.
old-fashioned new, modern, fashionable, up-to-date

quaint

adjective
1. Agreeably curious, especially in an old-fashioned or unusual way:
Translations
جَذّاب لِقِدَمِهطَرِيف
se starobylým půvabemstarobylý
ejendommeligløjerlig
viehättävän erikoinen
osebujan
sérkennilegur, skemmtilega gamaldags
古風で趣のある
별나고 아름다운
savotiškaisavotiškumas
dīvainssavāds
starobylýstarodávny
pittoresk
มีเสน่ห์แบบโบราณ
ilginçtuhaf ve hoş
kỳ lạ

quaint

[kweɪnt] ADJ (quainter (compar) (quaintest (superl)))
1. (= picturesque) [building, street, village] → pintoresco
2. (= odd) [custom, notion] → curioso; [person] → peculiar, poco corriente
how quaint!¡qué curioso!

quaint

[ˈkweɪnt] adj
(= old-fashioned) [word, phrase, concept, idea] → désuet/ète; [charm] → désuet/ète; [custom] → désuet/ète
[cottage, village, shop] → pittoresque
a quaint little cottage → un petit cottage pittoresque

quaint

adj (+er) (= picturesque) cottage, village, scenemalerisch, idyllisch; (= charmingly old-fashioned) pub, custom, expressionurig, reizend; (= pleasantly odd) ideakurios, schnurrig, putzig; nicknameoriginell; person, way of speakingdrollig; how quaint to live in such an old housedas ist ja urig, in so einem alten Haus zu wohnen; what a thought, my dear, how quaint!nein so was, meine Liebe, wie originell!

quaint

[kweɪnt] adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) (odd) → strano/a, bizzarro/a; (picturesque) → pittoresco/a; (old-fashioned) → antiquato/a e pittoresco/a

quaint

(kweint) adjective
pleasantly odd or strange, especially because of being old-fashioned. quaint customs.
ˈquaintly adverb
ˈquaintness noun

quaint

طَرِيف starobylý ejendommelig urig ιδιόρυθμος curioso viehättävän erikoinen désuet osebujan pittoresco 古風で趣のある 별나고 아름다운 grappig ouderwets pittoresk osobliwy fora do comum, incomum причудливый pittoresk มีเสน่ห์แบบโบราณ ilginç kỳ lạ 离奇有趣的
References in classic literature ?
It's dearer and quainter than even Miss Lavendar's stone house.
The old-fashioned brass knocker on the low arched door, ornamented with carved garlands of fruit and flowers, twinkled like a star; the two stone steps descending to the door were as white as if they had been covered with fair linen; and all the angles and corners, and carvings and mouldings, and quaint little panes of glass, and quainter little windows, though as old as the hills, were as pure as any snow that ever fell upon the hills.
A quainter corner than the corner where the Doctor lived, was not to be found in London.
The tower, as they left it behind, looked all the quainter, because such entrances are usually flanked by two towers; and this one looked lopsided.
Noticeably quieter - and quainter - than most cities back home, the centre of Amsterdam (given Unesco World Heritage Site status) feels small and friendly, and the canals - dominated by tall narrow old houses - put you in a completely different environment to the UK, It didn't feel like I was just over an hour's travel away from Manchester.
The younger MacAskill travels the globe hurtling off mountains and buildings on his bike " what in a quainter time might have been referred to as, yes, feats of strength.
Thus she speaks well of George Elson, who is "willing, kind and faithful," competent and good-natured with "his quaint tales, and quainter way of telling them" (939), and Job Chapies is a capable guide and bowsman, and no ill is spoken of others who assisted the Taskers in this expedition or on the 1904 moose hunt.
There are schools on the water, schools in the North, schools in our biggest urban centres, and schools in our smaller, quainter communities.
we have all probably spent a great number of nights in hotels as we travel to conferences, or in quainter times, to job interviews.
What I find about tea and coffee houses is that they are much quainter in appearance than full-on cafes.
I was hoping for something quainter, with a tradition," she had said, once they'd been seated.
They are words which signal the greatest moment in English football history - and are reflective of a nostalgic, quainter, more genteel age.