Quaker


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Related to Quaker: Amish

Quak·er

 (kwā′kər)
n.
A member of the Society of Friends.

[From quake (from an early leader's admonishment to "tremble at the word of the Lord").]

Quak′er·ism n.
Quak′er·ly adv. & adj.

Quaker

(ˈkweɪkə)
n
(Protestantism) a member of the Religious Society of Friends, a Christian sect founded by George Fox about 1650, whose central belief is the doctrine of the Inner Light. Quakers reject sacraments, ritual, and formal ministry, hold meetings at which any member may speak, and have promoted many causes for social reform
adj
(Protestantism) of, relating to, or designating the Religious Society of Friends or its religious beliefs or practices
[C17: originally a derogatory nickname, alluding either to their alleged ecstatic fits, or to George Fox's injunction to "quake at the word of the Lord"]
ˈQuakeress fem n
ˈQuakerish adj
ˈQuakerism n

Quak•er

(ˈkweɪ kər)

n.
a member of the Society of Friends, a Christian denomination founded by George Fox in 1650; Friend.
[1650–60; orig. pejorative; alluding to the supposed “shaking and quaking” of participants in early Friends' meetings]
Quak′er•ish, adj.
Quak′er•ism, n.
Quak′er•ly, adj., adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Quaker - a member of the Religious Society of Friends founded by George Fox (the Friends have never called themselves Quakers)Quaker - a member of the Religious Society of Friends founded by George Fox (the Friends have never called themselves Quakers)
Quakers, Religious Society of Friends, Society of Friends - a Christian sect founded by George Fox about 1660; commonly called Quakers
Christian - a religious person who believes Jesus is the Christ and who is a member of a Christian denomination
2.Quaker - one who quakes and trembles with (or as with) fearquaker - one who quakes and trembles with (or as with) fear
coward - a person who shows fear or timidity
Translations
kvaker
kvæker
kveekari
kveker
クエーカー
퀘이커 교도
kveker
kväkare
นิกายหนึ่งของศาสนาคริสต์ซึ่งเคร่งมาก
tín đồ Quaker

Quaker

[ˈkweɪkəʳ]
A. ADJcuáquero
B. Ncuáquero/a m/f

Quaker

[ˈkweɪkər] nquaker(esse) m/f

Quaker

nQuäker(in) m(f); Quaker schoolQuäkerschule f, → von Quäkern geleitete Schule; Quaker meetingTreffen ntder Quäker; Quaker familyQuäkerfamilie f

Quaker

[ˈkweɪkəʳ] nquacchero/a

Quaker

مُنْتَسِبٌ لِـجَمَاعَةِ الأَصّحَاب kvaker kvæker Quäker Κουακέρος cuáquero kveekari quaker kveker Quacchero クエーカー 퀘이커 교도 quaker kveker kwakier quacre, quaker квакер kväkare นิกายหนึ่งของศาสนาคริสต์ซึ่งเคร่งมาก Quaker mezhebinden tín đồ Quaker 教友派信徒
References in classic literature ?
Though Jones was very unfit for any kind of company, and would have preferred being alone, yet he could not resist the importunities of the honest Quaker; who was the more desirous of sitting with him, from having remarked the melancholy which appeared both in his countenance and behaviour; and which the poor Quaker thought his conversation might in some measure relieve.
WHEN his little audience next assembled round the chair, Grandfather gave them a doleful history of the Quaker persecution, which began in
These extravagances, and the persecution which was at once their cause and consequence, continued to increase, till, in the year 1659, the government of Massachusetts Bay indulged two members of the Quaker sect with a crown of martyrdom.
There was nothing so very particular, perhaps, about the appearance of the elderly man I saw; he was brown and brawny, like most old seamen, and heavily rolled up in blue pilot-cloth, cut in the Quaker style; only there was a fine and almost microscopic net-work of the minutest wrinkles interlacing round his eyes, which must have arisen from his continual sailings in many hard gales, and always looking to windward; --for this causes the muscles about the eyes to become pursed together.
She was not in black this morning, for her Aunt Poyser would by no means allow such a risk of incurring bad luck, and had herself made a present of the wedding dress, made all of grey, though in the usual Quaker form, for on this point Dinah could not give way.
The snowy fisse crape cap, made after the strait Quaker pattern,--the plain white muslin handkerchief, lying in placid folds across her bosom,--the drab shawl and dress,--showed at once the community to which she belonged.
Knowing the sentiments of the father in relation to this people, it was no wonder that the son hesitated to avow his connection with, nay, even his dependence on the integrity of, a Quaker.
We immediately went on shore, but found no conveniences just at that place, either for our being on shore or preserving our goods on shore, but was directed by a very honest Quaker, whom we found there, to go to a place about sixty miles east; that is to say, nearer the mouth of the bay, where he said he lived, and where we should be accommodated, either to plant, or to wait for any other place to plant in that might be more convenient; and he invited us with so much kindness and simple honesty, that we agreed to go, and the Quaker himself went with us.
Not any passenger that sailed in the Quaker City will withhold his endorsement of what I have just said.
Exactly, he is a Quaker, with the exception of the peculiar dress.
In another minute or two, the distant bathing machines would begin to move, and then the elderly gentlemen of regular habits and sober quaker ladies would be coming to take their salutary morning walks.
To be sure, he became a Friend by Convincement as the Quakers say, and so I cannot imagine that he was altogether worldly; but he had an eye to the main chance: he founded the industry of making flannels in the little Welsh town where he lived, and he seems to have grown richer, for his day and place, than any of us have since grown for ours.