quantifier

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quan·ti·fi·er

 (kwŏn′tə-fī′ər)
n.
1. Logic An operator that limits the variables of a proposition, as some or all.
2. Linguistics A word or other constituent that expresses a quantity or contrast in quantity, as some, all, or many.

quantifier

(ˈkwɒntɪˌfaɪə)
n
1. (Logic) logic
a. a symbol including a variable that indicates the degree of generality of the expression in which that variable occurs, as (∃x) in (∃x)Fx, rendered "something is an F", (x) in (x)(FxGx), rendered "all Fs are Gs"
b. any other symbol with an analogous interpretation: the existential quantifier, (∃x), corresponds to the words "there is something, x, such that …".
2. (Grammar) grammar a word or phrase in a natural language having this role, such as some, all, or many in English

quan•ti•fi•er

(ˈkwɒn təˌfaɪ ər)

n.
1. Logic. an expression, as “all” or “some,” that indicates the quantity of a proposition. Compare existential quantifier, universal quantifier.
2. a word or phrase, usu. modifying a noun, that indicates quantity, as much or few.
[1875–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quantifier - (logic) a word (such as `some' or `all' or `no') that binds the variables in a logical proposition
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
existential operator, existential quantifier - a logical quantifier of a proposition that asserts the existence of at least one thing for which the proposition is true
2.quantifier - (grammar) a word that expresses a quantity (as `fifteen' or `many')
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
universal quantifier - a logical quantifier of a proposition that asserts that the proposition is true for all members of a class of things
Translations

quantifier

[ˈkwɒntɪfaɪəʳ] Ncuantificador m

quantifier

n (Logic) → Quantor m
References in periodicals archive ?
This presupposes a certain understanding of quantification, namely, that it is ontologically committing, which the author challenges in this paper, arguing that the ontological loading of the quantifiers is smuggled in through restricting the domains of quantification, without which it is clear to see that quantifiers are ontologically neutral.
Logical constants, quantifiers, and alethic, epistemic, and deontic modalities belong to the general class of high-order concepts.
Participants listened to sentences containing one of the quantifiers (e.
As indicated in Table 1, for Grammar I students, the three most helpful topics in their writing classes were subject-verb agreement (91%), quantifiers (82%) and adverbials (80%).
This is not how the quantifiers are generally understood.
The reversed E and the inverted A are called existential and universal quantifiers, and they are employed in the predicate calculus to define the scope of predication in a given propositional statement.
The disputants in a metaphysical argument only differ over which of the available truth-conditionally equivalent ontological languages they are speaking--"the doctrine says that there is no uniquely best ontological language with which to describe the world" (xii); the quantifiers, and related expressions, are variable.
The 4ft quantifiers are described with properties and lemmas.
Fuzzy linguistic quantifiers are then introduced to aggregate and prioritize solution scenarios.
Frege treats quantifiers as second-level function-expressions ("concept-words"): they take first-level function-expressions as arguments and yield truth or falsehood as values.
t]--defined with quantifiers ([for all], [there exists]), boolean operations (and, or, not), and statements of the form a(t) x x [less than or equal to] b(t) (where a(t) [member of] Q[[t].
In the relevant game associated with (4), the players choose alternatively the elements a; b; c and d from the universe of M to be the interpretations of the four quantifiers (Both players have two choices corresponding to the universal and respectively the existential quantifiers).