quantum theory


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Related to quantum theory: quantum physics, String theory

quantum theory

n.
1. A theory in physics based on the principle that matter and energy have the properties of both particles and waves, created to explain the radiation of energy from a blackbody, the photoelectric effect, and the Bohr theory, and now used to account for a wide range of physical phenomena, including the existence of discrete packets of energy and matter, the uncertainty principle, and the exclusion principle.
2. Any of various specific applications of this theory.

quantum theory

n
(Atomic Physics) a theory concerning the behaviour of physical systems based on Planck's idea that they can only possess certain properties, such as energy and angular momentum, in discrete amounts (quanta). The theory later developed in several equivalent mathematical forms based on De Broglie's theory and on the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. See wave mechanics

quan′tum the`ory



n.
1. a theory for predicting the discrete energy states of atoms and of radiation.
2. any theory that describes a force or field using the methods of quantum mechanics: a quantum theory of gravitation.
[1910–15]

quantum theory

A theory in physics based on the principle that matter and energy behave both as particles and as waves. According to this theory, matter and energy are composed of tiny units of electromagnetic energy called quanta. Quantum theory is used to explain such phenomena as the photoelectric effect and the uncertainty principle. ♦ Another term for quantum theory is quantum mechanics, which also refers specifically to the use of quantum theory in studying the structure and behavior of atoms and molecules.

quantum theory

The theory that electromagnetic radiation consists of units called quanta or photons.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quantum theory - (physics) a physical theory that certain properties occur only in discrete amounts (quanta)
scientific theory - a theory that explains scientific observations; "scientific theories must be falsifiable"
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
indeterminacy principle, uncertainty principle - (quantum theory) the theory that it is impossible to measure both energy and time (or position and momentum) completely accurately at the same time
Translations

quantum theory

n (Phys) → teoria quantistica or dei quanti
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet if as I hope, basic science becomes part of general awareness, what now appear as a paradox of quantum theory will seem as just common sense to our children's children.
The Quantum Puzzle: Critique of Quantum Theory and Electrodynamics
So despite the fact that entanglement goes against classical intuition, entanglement must be an inevitable feature of not only quantum theory but also any non-classical theory, even those that are yet to be developed.
The overwhelming success of quantum theory in modeling the behavior of matter is unquestioned.
Quantum theory is about nature at its smallest scale and energy levels and describes the behaviour of sub-atomic particles like electrons, protons, neutrons and photons.
After a century, Quantum Theory remains an enigma: a uniquely successful predictive formalism in search of an intuitively clear, comprehensible, logically sound and self-consistent interpretation, with a concomitant philosophy and worldview--a quantum paradigm.
Chapters discuss the many inventions that have stemmed from quantum theory, survey the science behind these discoveries, and reveal how scientists and researchers apply quantum mechanics to new discoveries, making this a lively, accessible title not just to science readers, but for general-interest individuals.
Quantum theory explains how matter acts at the tiniest levels; in applying it to computing, researchers study ways in which that behavior can advance processing power.
Objective: Quantum Theory is one of the greatest scientific revolutions of the twentieth century.
The quantum theory of gravity explains the gravitational acceleration of matter as caused by the refraction of quantum waves by the time dependence and spatial inhomogeneities of the dynamical space flow [1].
John Gribbin uses quantum physics to argue for a universe of 'many parallel worlds' and explains how quantum theory led to quantum computing work theory and its eventual applications.

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