quarter-deck


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Translations

quarter-deck

[ˈkwɔːtəˌdɛk] n (Naut) → cassero

quarter

(ˈkwoːtə) noun
1. one of four equal parts of something which together form the whole (amount) of the thing. There are four of us, so we'll cut the cake into quarters; It's (a) quarter past / (American) after four; In the first quarter of the year his firm made a profit; The shop is about a quarter of a mile away; an hour and a quarter; two and a quarter hours.
2. in the United States and Canada, (a coin worth) twenty-five cents, the fourth part of a dollar.
3. a district or part of a town especially where a particular group of people live. He lives in the Polish quarter of the town.
4. a direction. People were coming at me from all quarters.
5. mercy shown to an enemy.
6. the leg of a usually large animal, or a joint of meat which includes a leg. a quarter of beef; a bull's hindquarters.
7. the shape of the moon at the end of the first and third weeks of its cycle; the first or fourth week of the cycle itself.
8. one of four equal periods of play in some games.
9. a period of study at a college etc usually 10 to 12 weeks in length.
verb
1. to cut into four equal parts. We'll quarter the cake and then we'll all have an equal share.
2. to divide by four. If we each do the work at the same time, we could quarter the time it would take to finish the job.
3. to give (especially a soldier) somewhere to stay. The soldiers were quartered all over the town.
ˈquarterly adjective
happening, published etc once every three months. a quarterly journal; quarterly payments.
adverb
once every three months. We pay our electricity bill quarterly.
plural ˈquarterliesnoun
a magazine etc which is published once every three months.
ˈquarters noun plural
a place to stay especially for soldiers.
ˈquarter-deck noun
the part of the upper deck of a ship between the stern and the mast nearest it.
ˌquarter-ˈfinal noun
(often in plural) the third-last round in a competition.
ˌquarter-ˈfinalist noun
ˈquartermaster noun
an officer whose job is to provide soldiers with food, transport, a place to live etc.
at close quarters
close to; close together. The soldiers were fighting with the enemy at close quarters.
References in classic literature ?
When at last I showed him out on the quarter-deck he drew a long, spiritless sigh, and mumbled dismally that he must really be going back to his ship now.
Captain Thorn was an honest, straighforward, but somewhat dry and dictatorial commander, who, having been nurtured in the system and discipline of a ship of war, and in a sacred opinion of the supremacy of the quarter-deck, was disposed to be absolute lord and master on board of his ship.
Taking a few turns on the quarter-deck, he paused to gaze over the side, then slowly getting into the main-chains he took Stubb's long spade --still remaining there after the whale's decapitation --and striking it into the lower part of the half-suspended mass, placed its other end crutch-wise under one arm, and so stood leaning over with eyes attentively fixed on this head.
Upon the quarter-deck of the flagship, sheltered by a canopy of velvet and ermine, which was suspended by stout supports, Henrietta, the queen dowager, and the young princess -- with the admiral, the Duke of Norfolk -- standing beside them -- watched with alarm this slender bark, at one moment tossed to the heavens, and the next buried beneath the waves, and against whose dark sail the noble figures of the two French gentlemen stood forth in relief like two luminous apparitions.
Those glorious bunches of bananas, which once decorated our stern and quarter-deck, have, alas, disappeared