quarter-deck


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Translations

quarter-deck

[ˈkwɔːtəˌdɛk] n (Naut) → cassero

quarter

(ˈkwoːtə) noun
1. one of four equal parts of something which together form the whole (amount) of the thing. There are four of us, so we'll cut the cake into quarters; It's (a) quarter past / (American) after four; In the first quarter of the year his firm made a profit; The shop is about a quarter of a mile away; an hour and a quarter; two and a quarter hours.
2. in the United States and Canada, (a coin worth) twenty-five cents, the fourth part of a dollar.
3. a district or part of a town especially where a particular group of people live. He lives in the Polish quarter of the town.
4. a direction. People were coming at me from all quarters.
5. mercy shown to an enemy.
6. the leg of a usually large animal, or a joint of meat which includes a leg. a quarter of beef; a bull's hindquarters.
7. the shape of the moon at the end of the first and third weeks of its cycle; the first or fourth week of the cycle itself.
8. one of four equal periods of play in some games.
9. a period of study at a college etc usually 10 to 12 weeks in length.
verb
1. to cut into four equal parts. We'll quarter the cake and then we'll all have an equal share.
2. to divide by four. If we each do the work at the same time, we could quarter the time it would take to finish the job.
3. to give (especially a soldier) somewhere to stay. The soldiers were quartered all over the town.
ˈquarterly adjective
happening, published etc once every three months. a quarterly journal; quarterly payments.
adverb
once every three months. We pay our electricity bill quarterly.
plural ˈquarterliesnoun
a magazine etc which is published once every three months.
ˈquarters noun plural
a place to stay especially for soldiers.
ˈquarter-deck noun
the part of the upper deck of a ship between the stern and the mast nearest it.
ˌquarter-ˈfinal noun
(often in plural) the third-last round in a competition.
ˌquarter-ˈfinalist noun
ˈquartermaster noun
an officer whose job is to provide soldiers with food, transport, a place to live etc.
at close quarters
close to; close together. The soldiers were fighting with the enemy at close quarters.
References in classic literature ?
From father to son, for above a hundred years, they followed the sea; a grey-headed shipmaster, in each generation, retiring from the quarter-deck to the homestead, while a boy of fourteen took the hereditary place before the mast, confronting the salt spray and the gale which had blustered against his sire and grandsire.
For as in this world, head winds are far more prevalent than winds from astern (that is, if you never violate the Pythagorean maxim), so for the most part the Commodore on the quarter-deck gets his atmosphere at second hand from the sailors on the forecastle.
Taking a few turns on the quarter-deck, he paused to gaze over the side, then slowly getting into the main-chains he took Stubb's long spade --still remaining there after the whale's decapitation --and striking it into the lower part of the half-suspended mass, placed its other end crutch-wise under one arm, and so stood leaning over with eyes attentively fixed on this head.
Admiral Bartram took his quarter-deck walk again, up and down the room.
Miss Mills had sailed, and Dora and I had gone aboard a great East Indiaman at Gravesend to see her; and we had had preserved ginger, and guava, and other delicacies of that sort for lunch; and we had left Miss Mills weeping on a camp-stool on the quarter-deck, with a large new diary under her arm, in which the original reflections awakened by the contemplation of Ocean were to be recorded under lock and key.
Livesey were talking together on the quarter-deck, and anxious as I was to tell them my story, I durst not interrupt them openly.