quartodeciman


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quartodeciman

(ˌkwɔːtəʊˈdɛsɪmən)
n
(Christian Churches, other) Early Church one of a group of early Christians who observed Easter on the day of the Jewish Passover regardless of whether or not it was Sunday
References in periodicals archive ?
who] are as one might expect mentally blind"; they are a "detestable mob," a "nation of parricides and Lord-killers," whose traditions prevent people (including Quartodeciman Christians) from joining in what was most important to Constantine--a tidy, homogeneous, unified public religious culture in which "everyone everywhere" agrees and worships together--VC 3.
Unfortunately, however, for current liturgical and spiritual enrichment, they are deeply embedded in trenchant anti-Judaic polemics, thus giving rise to an ambivalence similar to that evoked by Melito of Sardis's On the Pasch (both emerged from a fading Quartodeciman liturgical environment).
This is a fundamental witness of the Quartodeciman Christology of Asia Minor in the second century, just mentioned in a footnote on page 37.
After a chapter devoted to the theories of the long line of his predecessors, he discusses in detail the probability that for contemporaries the 'great sabbath' on which Polycarp was martyred had a theological significance, and one, moreover, connected with a Quartodeciman dating of Easter.
And Ephrem's paschal hymns "almost immediately recall the most ancient paschal homily that we know, that of the Quartodeciman Melito of Sardis" (G.
It should be remembered that Christian heresiology included a component that had to do with different practice as well as different creed too, for instance, the Quartodeciman controversy or the question of Eucharist on Saturdays.
The effect of this Jacobean program--a possible antecedent to the later Quartodeciman practice?
These Christians were known as Quartodecimans (the name means "Fourteeners").
17) Canon 7 of the Second Ecumenical Council, Constantinople I (381), provided for the reception of Arians, Macedonians, Sabbatians, Novatians, Cathars, Aristeri, Quartodecimans, and Apollinarians who renounced their heretical ways, likewise by having them chrismated.
Montanists and Quartodecimans who came from Asia Minor and continued their customs and theology in Rome.
Similarly, the council of Laodicia required rebaptism for Montanists but chrismation for Novatianists or Quartodecimans.
Holl) reports that the Quartodecimans, early Christians who ate the Passover meal with the Jews on the evening of 14 Nisan, celebrated the Passover on 25 March because they had read in the Acts of Pilate that Jesus died on that day.