quay


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quay

 (kē, kā, kwā)
n.
A wharf or reinforced bank for the loading or unloading of ships or boats.

[Middle English keye, from Old North French cai, of Celtic origin.]

quay

(kiː)
n
(Human Geography) a wharf, typically one built parallel to the shoreline. Compare pier1
[C14 keye, from Old French kai, of Celtic origin; compare Cornish hedge, fence, Old Breton cai fence]

quay


(kē, kā, kwā),
n.
a landing place, esp. one of solid masonry, constructed along the edge of a body of water; wharf.
[1690–1700; sp. variant (after French quai) of earlier kay (also key, whence the modern pronunciation) < Old French kay, cay, akin to Sp cayo shoal. See key2]

quay

A structure of solid construction along a shore or bank that provides berthing and generally provides cargo-handling facilities. A similar facility of open construction is called a wharf. See also wharf.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quay - wharf usually built parallel to the shorelinequay - wharf usually built parallel to the shoreline
pier, wharf, wharfage, dock - a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats

quay

noun dock, pier, landing, harbour, berth, wharf, jetty, pontoon, slipway, landing stage Jack and Stephen were waiting for them on the quay.
Translations
nábřežínákladištěpřístaviště
kaj
laituri
pristanište
rakodópartrakpart
hafnarbakki
埠頭
부두선창
izbūvēta krastmalamolspiestātne
nákladisko
nabrežje
kaj
ที่ที่เอาเรือเข้าเทียบท่า
bến tàu

quay

[kiː] Nmuelle m
on the quayen el muelle

quay

[ˈkiː] nquai m
on the quay → sur le quai

quay

nKai m; alongside the quayam Kai

quay

[kiː] nmolo, banchina

quay

(kiː) , (kei) noun
a solid, usually stone, landing-place, where boats are loaded and unloaded. The boat is moored at the quay.
ˈquayside noun
the side or edge of a quay. The boat was tied up at the quayside.

quay

رَصِيفُ الـمِينَاء nábřeží kaj Kai αποβάθρα muelle laituri quai pristanište banchina 埠頭 선창 kade kai nadbrzeże cais причал kaj ที่ที่เอาเรือเข้าเทียบท่า iskele bến tàu 码头
References in classic literature ?
He knew Vevay well, and as soon as the boat touched the little quay, he hurried along the shore to La Tour, where the Carrols were living en pension.
Half the sky was chequered with black thunderheads, but all the west was luminous and clear: in the lightning flashes it looked like deep blue water, with the sheen of moonlight on it; and the mottled part of the sky was like marble pavement, like the quay of some splendid seacoast city, doomed to destruction.
One cloudy moonlight night, in the third week of December (I think the twenty-second of the month) in the year 1757, I was walking on a retired part of the quay by the Seine for the refreshment of the frosty air, at an hour's distance from my place of residence in the Street of the School of Medicine, when a carriage came along behind me, driven very fast.
This will do," he answered, and having got out hastily and given the driver the extra fare he had promised him, he walked quickly in the direction of the quay.
She quietly left the quay and then suddenly walked quickly up the road.
One day after my return, as I went down to the quay, I saw a ship which had just cast anchor, and was discharging her cargo, while the merchants to whom it belonged were busily directing the removal of it to their warehouses.
The garden, full of common flowers, ends in a natural terrace, forming a quay, down which are several steps leading to the river.
The band on the pier is playing a harsh waltz in good time, and further along the quay there is a Salvation Army meeting in a back street.
Further on, some remains of a gigantic aqueduct; here the high base of an Acropolis, with the floating outline of a Parthenon; there traces of a quay, as if an ancient port had formerly abutted on the borders of the ocean, and disappeared with its merchant vessels and its war-galleys.
Little by little the scene on the quay became more animated; sailors of various nations, merchants, ship-brokers, porters, fellahs, bustled to and fro as if the steamer were immediately expected.
He therefore went down the Rue des Petits Augustins, and came up to the quay, in order to take the New Bridge.
The shipowner, smiling, followed him with his eyes until he saw him spring out on the quay and disappear in the midst of the throng, which from five o'clock in the morning until nine o'clock at night, swarms in the famous street of La Canebiere, -- a street of which the modern Phocaeans are so proud that they say with all the gravity in the world, and with that accent which gives so much character to what is said, "If Paris had La Canebiere, Paris would be a second Marseilles.