qubit

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Related to Qubits: Quantum computing

qu·bit

 (kyo͞o′bĭt′)

qubit

(ˈkjuːbɪt)
n
(Computer Science) computing a quantum bit
[C20: from qu(antum) + bit4]
Translations
qubit
qubit
qubit
qubit
References in periodicals archive ?
Google's new Bristlecone chip has a whopping 72 qubits compared with just nine qubits in the last one.
That seems to be shifting now, with a cascade of advances, not only in building the quantum bits but also in quantum memory devices and processes to link the qubits together into a working computer.
Skoltech Professor Jacob Biamonte told TASS in a recent interview that 50 qubits is right on the threshold of where quantum processors will definitively outperform classical ones.
Quantum machines require extensive error-correction to make up for the fact that qubits are inherently fragile.
The point at which a quantum machine should be able to perform computations too complex to model on any conventional machine, a benchmark known as "quantum supremacy," has been believed to be about 49 qubits, the quantum equivalent of the bits that represent 1 or 0 in a conventional computer.
Unlike standard computer memory which uses a list of bits - zeros and ones - to represent one of two states at any given time, qubits (quantum bits) ignore traditional laws of physics, and all possible lists of zeros and ones can exist simultaneously.
A bit stores information as either 0 or 1, while qubits can exist as both 0 and 1 simultaneously, exponentially increasing the computing power of a system that uses them.
By storing information this way, with chains of entangled qubits, you can dramatically increase the power of a single computer system.
IBM's first prototype commercial processor with 17 qubits and leverages significant materials, device, and architecture improvements to make it the most powerful quantum processor created to date by IBM.
The engineering improvements will allow IBM to scale future processors to include 50 or more qubits, and demonstrate computational capabilities beyond today's classical computing systems," said Arvind Krishna,
Just as computer scientists can perform operations on bits (adding or subtracting numbers, for instance), the researchers could apply operations to the fluorine qubits by using pulses of radio waves to tweak the state of the nuclear spins.
An article from the Economist briefly summarizes the processes of high-speed quantum computing: Superposition breaks down bits into qubits - a conventional computer can work in one of 16 states at a time while the quantum computer can work with all 16 at once.