queen's shilling


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queen's shilling

(when the sovereign was female) n
1. (Military) (until 1879) a shilling paid to new recruits to the British army
2. (Military) take the queen's shilling archaic Brit to enlist in the army
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References in classic literature ?
At last, however, when I was about eighteen, I gave them no more trouble, for I got into a mess over a girl, and could only get out of it again by taking the queen's shilling and joining the 3d Buffs, which was just starting for India.
These men took the Queen's shilling," Mr Carpenter told TVNZ.
Even our dogs of war now cast aside IT is a heartbreaking sight seeing ex-soldiers who once took the Queen's shilling but who are now sleeping rough on our streets, many left with the scars of war, needing alcoholic relief to hide the visions of hell.
Shelly said: "Our fathers took the Queen's shilling but we had no choice.
In the interim I had been accepted by the Royal Marines and went to the Bristol Recruiting Office where I took the Oath of Allegiance, I was paid a day's pay, I had taken the Queen's shilling and there was no turning back.
That is before the players get fed up and take the French euro or the Queen's Shilling in England.
He took the Queen's Shilling at 15 and served with the Green Howards, his brother was an officer, their father was a submariner during the Second World War, and their grandfather served with the Irish Guards in the First World War.
April 23 is a day to be proud of, a day to remember and celebrate and thank the gods that good men and true will continue to take the Queen's shilling and defend the flag, the crown and good folk of these islands.
IF you take the Queen's Shilling, whether in the armed forces, in the prison service or the police force, then you are bound by the necessity of serving the public, who are your paymasters.
Yes, our servicemen and women take the Queen's shilling and put themselves in danger of serious injury and even death as do the firemen and police (who receive greater remuneration than our soldiers) and who are praised, rightly so, for their valour.
But what, presumably, Plaid Cymru mean is the Army visits to schools, which might some way down the line, lead a young man or woman to taking the Queen's shilling (note to would-be recruits, it's more than a shilling nowadays, not that you know what a shilling is anyway).