queenship


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Related to queenship: Queenship of Mary

queen·ship

 (kwēn′shĭp′)
n.
1. The rank or state of being a queen.
2. A noble or regal quality, as of a queen.

queenship

(ˈkwiːnʃɪp)
n
1. the state of being a queen
2. a respectful title for a queen
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References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, senior actresses like Nora Aunor and Vilma Santos are still starring in quality films, making it more difficult for younger women to challenge their queenship.
The bills seeks to amend the Traditional Leadership and Governance Framework Act, 2003, so as to make provision for extended timeframes within which kingship of queenship councils and traditional councils must be established.
The publication of this Spanish translation of Knox's text forms part of a growing body of scholarship on queens and queenship in recent years, and particularly of the royal women of early modern Europe--Campbell Orr (2004), Benassar ([2006] 2007), Craveri ([2005] 2007), Jansen (2008), Cruz and Suzuki (2009), Wellman (2013), among others.
Given that we have less than six weeks to save our democracy, and our economy, from May's quasi queenship, we need all candidates opposed to this outcome to come together.
He then turns to women and war, discussing not only new opportunities temporarily available to women as a consequence of plague and war but also legal rights and the varying impact of queenship in both England and France.
The 'Queen of Hell' for example--what are we to understand his views of her queenship to be" ("New England Magazine--for April").
Yet, the romanticization of these former martyrs specifically allowed for the depiction of royal marriage and queenship.
Material Culture and Queenship in 14th-Century France: The Testament of Blanche of Navarre (1331-1398)
It is hoped that by discussing the idiolectal-pragmatic connections, this evidence will also be made to speak to larger questions linked to the nature of Margaret's queenship (especially in terms of'Scottishness'), and our understanding of a crucial period in the history of Scots and English.
5) On the importance of Shakespeare's tragedy to Margarets notoriety in Britain see PatriciaAnn Lee, "Reflections of Power: Margaret of Anjou and the Dark Side of Queenship," Renaissance Quarterly 39 (1986): 183-217 (183-84).
The man who's imagined himself king is as rare as the woman who hasn't deeply pondered her queenship.
Our students' projects ranged from a study of modernity in sculpture, to an analysis of data from a sleep lab dealing with parasomnia, to an examination of queenship in Shakespeare's plays, to a study of rock formations in New Zealand, to a rhetorical examination of archived Asian-American campus publications, and many more.

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