quicksand


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quick·sand

 (kwĭk′sănd′)
n.
1. Sand that is mixed with water in a collected mass and yields easily to pressure so that objects on its surface tend to sink and become engulfed.
2. often quicksands A place or situation into which entry can be swift and sudden but from which extrication can be difficult or impossible: "This theory of the future entrapped [them] in the quicksands of Vietnam" (Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.).

[Middle English quyksond, living sand : quick, quyk, living; see quick + sand, sond, sand; see sand.]

quicksand

(ˈkwɪkˌsænd)
n
(Physical Geography) a deep mass of loose wet sand that submerges anything on top of it

quick•sand

(ˈkwɪkˌsænd)

n.
a bed of soft or loose sand saturated with water and having considerable depth, yielding under weight and therefore tending to cause an object resting on its surface to sink.
[1275–1325]
quick′sand′y, adj.

quick·sand

(kwĭk′sănd′)
A deep bed of loose sand mixed with water, forming a soft, shifting mass that yields easily to pressure and tends to swallow objects resting on its surface.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quicksand - a treacherous situation that tends to entrap and destroyquicksand - a treacherous situation that tends to entrap and destroy
situation - a complex or critical or unusual difficulty; "the dangerous situation developed suddenly"; "that's quite a situation"; "no human situation is simple"
2.quicksand - a pit filled with loose wet sand into which objects are sucked down
cavity, pit - a sizeable hole (usually in the ground); "they dug a pit to bury the body"
sand - a loose material consisting of grains of rock or coral
Translations
tekutý písek
juoksuhiekka
živi pijesak
kvicksand

quicksand

[ˈkwɪksænd] Narenas fpl movedizas

quicksand

[ˈkwɪksænd] nsables mpl mouvantsquick-setting [ˌkwɪkˈsɛtɪŋ] adj [cement] → à prise rapide; [jelly] → qui prend facilement

quicksand

[ˈkwɪkˌsænd] nsabbie fpl mobili
References in classic literature ?
Some gamesome wights will tell you that they have to plant weeds there, they don't grow naturally; that they import Canada thistles; that they have to send beyond seas for a spile to stop a leak in an oil cask; that pieces of wood in Nantucket are carried about like bits of the true cross in Rome; that people there plant toadstools before their houses, to get under the shade in summer time; that one blade of grass makes an oasis, three blades in a day's walk a prairie; that they wear quicksand shoes, something like Laplander snowshoes; that they are so shut up, belted about, every way inclosed, surrounded, and made an utter island of by the ocean, that to their very chairs and tables small clams will sometimes be found adhering, as to the backs of sea turtles.
So overboard he goes again, to hunt for another Ararat and find another quicksand.
The poor dear grew white as death, and shook and shivered, as I have seen a quicksand shake and shiver at the incoming of the tide.
There were seniors who had requisitioned a chance-met Rajah's elephant, in the name of St Francis Xavier, when the Rains once blotted out the cart-track that led to their father's estate, and had all but lost the huge beast in a quicksand.
Gladly we would anchor, but the anchorage is quicksand.
Gringoire, still followed by his three persecutors, and not knowing very well what was to become of him, marched along in terror among them, turning out for the lame, stepping over the cripples in bowls, with his feet imbedded in that ant-hill of lame men, like the English captain who got caught in the quicksand of a swarm of crabs.
He was sure that since her disappearance from home this great, water-girt city held her somewhere, but it was like a monstrous quicksand, shifting its particles constantly, with no foundation, its upper granules of to-day buried to-morrow in ooze and slime.
Between the two, shifting backwards and forwards at certain seasons of the year, lies the most horrible quicksand on the shores of Yorkshire.
When I got out, through the sand-hills, on to the beach, there she was, in her little straw bonnet, and her plain grey cloak that she always wore to hide her deformed shoulder as much as might be-- there she was, all alone, looking out on the quicksand and the sea.
She snatched her hand off my shoulder, and suddenly pointed down to the quicksand.
They had left two men in the boat, who, as I found afterwards, having drunk a little too much brandy, fell asleep; however, one of them waking a little sooner than the other and finding the boat too fast aground for him to stir it, hallooed out for the rest, who were straggling about: upon which they all soon came to the boat: but it was past all their strength to launch her, the boat being very heavy, and the shore on that side being a soft oozy sand, almost like a quicksand.
They were found in places that are reasonably dangerous in terms of quicksand.