quid


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

quid 1

 (kwĭd)
n.
A cut, as of chewing tobacco.

[Middle English quide, cud, from Old English cwidu.]

quid 2

 (kwĭd)
n. pl. quid or quids Chiefly British
A pound sterling.

[Possibly from Latin, something, what; see quiddity.]

quid

(kwɪd)
n
a piece of tobacco, suitable for chewing
[Old English cwidu chewing resin; related to Old High German quiti glue, Old Norse kvātha resin; see cud]

quid

(kwɪd)
n, pl quid
1. (Currencies) slang Brit one pound sterling
2. quids in slang Brit in a very favourable or advantageous position
3. not the full quid slang Austral and NZ mentally subnormal
[C17: of obscure origin]

quid1

(kwɪd)

n.
a portion of something, esp. tobacco, that is to be chewed but not swallowed.
[1720–30; dial. variant of cud]

quid2

(kwɪd)

n., pl. quid.
Brit. Informal. one pound sterling.
[1680–90; orig. uncertain]
cud, quid - The etymological base of cud appears to be "glutinous substance"; quid—"piece of tobacco for chewing"—is a variant of cud.
See also related terms for tobacco.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quid - the basic unit of money in Great Britain and Northern Irelandquid - the basic unit of money in Great Britain and Northern Ireland; equal to 100 pence
British monetary unit - monetary unit in Great Britain
penny - a fractional monetary unit of Ireland and the United Kingdom; equal to one hundredth of a pound
2.quid - something for something; that which a party receives (or is promised) in return for something he does or gives or promises
retainer, consideration - a fee charged in advance to retain the services of someone
3.quid - a wad of something chewable as tobaccoquid - a wad of something chewable as tobacco
bite, morsel, bit - a small amount of solid food; a mouthful; "all they had left was a bit of bread"
Translations
funt

quid

1 [kwɪd] N (Brit) → libra f (esterlina)
three quidtres libras
to be quids inhaber ganado bastante

quid

2 [kwɪd] N [of tobacco] → mascada f (de tabaco)

quid

[ˈkwɪd] [quid] (pl) n (British)livre f
to be quids in (= better off) → être gagnant(e) financièrement
They're quids in, thanks to the EC
BUT C'est tout bénef > pour eux grâce à la CE.quid pro quo [ˌkwɪdprəʊˈkwəʊ] ncontrepartie f

quid

1
n pl <-> (Brit inf) → Pfund nt; 20 quid20 Eier (sl); to be quids inauf sein Geld kommen (inf)

quid

2
n (= tobacco)Priem m

quid

[kwɪd] n (Brit) (fam) (pl inv) → sterlina
References in classic literature ?
The captain hitched up his trousers, then shifted his quid thoughtfully.
His brimmed hat of worn felt was well pulled over his eyes, and he revolved a quid of tobacco in his left cheek.
The man whom he called Morgan--an old, grey-haired, mahogany-faced sailor--came forward pretty sheepishly, rolling his quid.
Penelon rolled his quid in his cheek, placed his hand before his mouth, turned his head, and sent a long jet of tobacco-juice into the antechamber, advanced his foot, balanced himself, and began, -- "You see, M.
The old man was advertising for me then, and a chum I had with me had a no- tion of getting a couple quid out of him by writ- ing a lot of silly nonsense in a letter.
Septimius Severus in despatch; Adeste si quid mihi restat agendum.
Freddy had half a quid and his friend had four half-crowns.
in a meditative voice, seated himself at the helm, somewhat saddened by his failure to borrow a quid of tobacco from the
It is a hard thing when one has shot sixty-five lions or more, as I have in the course of my life, that the sixty-sixth should chew your leg like a quid of tobacco.
She was knocked down to her for fifty-five quid by the third-assistant-resident-commissioner.
I bet there's a hundred men in Sydney right now that would fork over twenty quid for the right of calling you his.
Why, I even went back over my accounts and paid Sweitzer fifty quid I'd jiggered him out of in a deal in Fiji three years before.