quietism

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qui·et·ism

 (kwī′ĭ-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. A form of Christian mysticism enjoining passive contemplation and the beatific annihilation of the will.
2. A state of quietness and passivity.

qui′et·ist n.
qui′et·is′tic adj.

quietism

(ˈkwaɪəˌtɪzəm)
n
1. (Christian Churches, other) a form of religious mysticism originating in Spain in the late 17th century, requiring withdrawal of the spirit from all human effort and complete passivity to God's will
2. a state of passivity and calmness of mind towards external events
ˈquietist n, adj

qui•et•ism

(ˈkwaɪ ɪˌtɪz əm)

n.
a form of Christian mysticism first promulgated in the late 17th century, requiring extinction of the will and worldly interests, and passive meditation on the divine.

quietism

a 17th-century Christian mystical theory, originated in Spain by Molinos and promulgated in France by Fénelon, involving passive contem-plation and surrender of the will to God and indifference to the demands of the self or the outside world, declared heretical through efforts of the Inquisition. — quietist, n., adj.
See also: Heresy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quietism - a form of religious mysticism requiring withdrawal from all human effort and passive contemplation of God
mysticism, religious mysticism - a religion based on mystical communion with an ultimate reality
Translations

quietism

[ˈkwaɪɪtɪzəm] Nquietismo m

quietism

nQuietismus m
References in classic literature ?
Both are quietists, yet in this respect they differ, that the former is the grey quietist, the latter the pearl.
This has side-lined the Najaf-based quietists of Grand Ayatullah Ali al-Sistani (see fap4AbadiMaleki12Oct15, rim4Safawis19Oct15 & news15RusVsUSsyr12Oct15).
The quietists are led by Najaf-based Grand Ayatullah Ali al-Sistani who as a theologian is far superior to Khamenei.
The quietists, for example, often accuse Iran's activists of enacting such laws.
Its Salafi critics fall into two categories: the quietists fearing militant challenges to the Al-Saud family's control of the kingdom and enjoin obedience to the ruler even if unjust, and reformists who reject IS' totalitarianism as contradicting Salafist tradition that promotes freedom of expression and endorses opposition to authority.
Moreover, Wahhabis are often political quietists and those in Saudi Arabia fully support the monarchy.
Religious reformers are quietists - wanting to see the theocrats gradually withdraw from politics - and call for closer links to the West.
Of the various Ja'fari religious schools, that of the quietists led by Najaf-based Grand Ayatullah Ali al-Sistani is the most moderate and its influences are spreading in the GME.
Through a careful appraisal of the works of Fenelon and Guyon and their relation to more than three centuries of Protestant literature, this study investigates why, by the beginning of the twentieth century, these two French Quietists were regularly invoked as spiritual authorities and as figures that exemplified the experience of sanctification.
Teresa's writings on Contemplative Prayer state that those who presumptuously thrust themselves into mystical or passive prayer remain there like "Dolts," like the Quietists (another heresy).
Upham's discovery of French thinkers often classified together as Quietists was not unprecedented among Protestants, and his book succeeded in part because it belonged to an ecumenical devotional tradition.