quinary


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quinary

(ˈkwaɪnərɪ)
adj
1. consisting of fives or by fives
2. fifth in a series
3. (Mathematics) (of a number system) having a base of five
n, pl -ries
a set of five
[C17: from Latin quīnārius containing five, from quīnī five each]

Quinary

 a set of five things.
References in classic literature ?
A naturalist, struck by a parallelism of this nature in any one class, by arbitrarily raising or sinking the value of the groups in other classes (and all our experience shows that this valuation has hitherto been arbitrary), could easily extend the parallelism over a wide range; and thus the septenary, quinary, quaternary, and ternary classifications have probably arisen.
Many see potentials to move away from primary industries and towards a focus on quaternary and quinary sectors (the knowledge-based parts of the economy).
Contrast quaternary and quadruple (4 of) with 8 and 9 letters, quinary and quintuple (5 of) with 7 and 9 letters, septenary and septuple (7) with 9 and 8 letters, and novenary and nonuple (9) with 8 and 7 letters.
Aymara appears to have originally had a quinary, or base five, system of numeration.
The metrical structure is that of a double quinary (or verses composed of tive syllables) hinged in quatrains.
After defining a level of Martin-Lof randomness he looks in turn at binary, ternary, quanternary, quinary, and larger radix systems then surveys some universal and truncated applications.
We present a case of a quinary debulking consisting of an en bloc resection of an ovarian cancer implant extending from the hepatic dome to the pulmonary parenchyma through the full thickness of the diaphragm.
When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently, a quinary of common themes surfaced again and again.
Turkish party has been insisting on a quinary conference to be held in regard to the Cyprus issue by the end of the year.
The Quinary Group will be run by David Mills as chairman and Christine Harris as managing director, both former executives with West-t bury Homes, alongside sales training consultant Katie Welch and Anne Parry, who is known for her role at Freshwater PR.
Sidney Ray, CAETS language specialist, adopts this system in Volume III of the Reports, where counting practices are divided into four categories: 1) quinary, or base number 5; 2) imperfect decimal, where base 10 is used following the use of quinary; 3) Decimal, with a straight base number 10 and; 4) Vigesimal, where quinary is used up to 20, upon which a primary base 20 takes over (Reports III [Ray] 1907:464).
For example N = 61 can be written in quinary (base-5) representation as N = [221.