quince


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Related to quince: quince jelly

quince

 (kwĭns)
n.
1. A shrub or small tree (Cydonia oblonga) in the rose family, native to western Asia, having white or pink flowers and hard yellow pear-shaped fruit.
2. The aromatic, many-seeded fruit of this plant, usually used for jelly or in cooked dishes.

[Middle English quynce, pl. of quyn, quince, from Old French cooin, from Latin cotōneum (mālum), quince (fruit), probably variant of cydōnium, from Greek dialectal kudōnion (mālon), alteration (influenced by Kudōniā, Cydonia, an ancient city of northwest Crete) of kodumālon.]

quince

(kwɪns)
n
1. (Plants) a small widely cultivated Asian rosaceous tree, Cydonia oblonga, with pinkish-white flowers and edible pear-shaped fruits
2. (Plants) the acid-tasting fruit of this tree, much used in preserves
3. (Plants) Also: Japanese or flowering quince another name for japonica
[C14 qwince plural of quyn quince, from Old French coin, from Latin cotōneum, from Greek kudōnion quince, Cydonian (apple)]

quince


(kwins),
n.
1. a small tree, Cydonia oblonga, of the rose family, bearing hard, fragrant, yellowish fruit used chiefly for making jelly or preserves.
2. the fruit of such a tree.
[1275–1325; Middle English, appar. orig. pl. (taken as singular) of quyne, coyn < Middle French cooin < Latin cotōneum, akin to cydōnium < Greek (mêlon) Kydṓnion quince, literally, (apple) of Cydonia]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quince - small Asian tree with pinkish flowers and pear-shaped fruitquince - small Asian tree with pinkish flowers and pear-shaped fruit; widely cultivated
quince - aromatic acid-tasting pear-shaped fruit used in preserves
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
2.quince - aromatic acid-tasting pear-shaped fruit used in preserves
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
Cydonia oblonga, quince, quince bush - small Asian tree with pinkish flowers and pear-shaped fruit; widely cultivated
false fruit, pome - a fleshy fruit (apple or pear or related fruits) having seed chambers and an outer fleshy part
Translations
سَفَرْجَل
kdoulekdouloň
kvædefrugt
kvitteni
dunja
birsalmabirsalmafabirs
roîarunnaepli
svarainis
cidonija
gutui
dula

quince

[kwɪns]
A. Nmembrillo m
B. CPD quince cheese, quince jelly N(dulce m de) membrillo m

quince

[ˈkwɪns] n
(= fruit) → coing m
(= tree) → cognassier m

quince

n (= fruit, tree)Quitte f; quince jellyQuittengelee nt

quince

[kwɪns] n (fruit) → (mela) cotogna; (tree) → cotogno

quince

(kwins) noun
a fruit with a sharp taste, used in making jam etc.
References in classic literature ?
with pomegranate, fig, olive and quince orchards, and nooned an hour
Good Quince was an honest fellow, but his wits were somewhat of the heavy sort, like unbaked dough, so that the only thing that was in his mind was, "Three shillings sixpence ha'penny for thy shoon, good Quince--three shillings sixpence ha'penny for thy shoon," and this traveled round and round inside of his head, without another thought getting into his noddle, as a pea rolls round and round inside an empty quart pot.
Truly, Quince the Cobbler will ha' a fine feast this day an I mistake not.
But tell me, good Quince," said Robin, "hast thou a mind to sell those things to me?
Quoth he, "By the turn of thy voice, good Quince, I know that thou hast a fair song or two running loose in thy head like colts in a meadow.
The pear can be grafted far more readily on the quince, which is ranked as a distinct genus, than on the apple, which is a member of the same genus.
This is a nice scattered little town, with many gardens, full of peach and quince trees.
But what I am of opinion the governor should cat now in order to preserve and fortify his health is a hundred or so of wafer cakes and a few thin slices of conserve of quinces, which will settle his stomach and help his digestion.
Coquenard rose and took from a buffet a piece of cheese, some preserved quinces, and a cake which she had herself made of almonds and honey.
In September come grapes; apples; poppies of all colors; peaches; melocotones; nectarines; cornelians; wardens; quinces.
Fred liked it too, knowing it by heart even to the attic which smelt deliciously of apples and quinces, and until to-day he had never come to it without pleasant expectations; but his heart beat uneasily now with the sense that he should probably have to make his confession before Mrs.
An elderberry hobbled across the walk, and stood chatting with some young quinces, and they all had crutches.