quire


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quire 1

 (kwīr)
n.
1. A set of 24 or sometimes 25 sheets of paper of the same size and stock; one twentieth of a ream.
2. A collection of leaves of parchment or paper, folded one within the other, in a manuscript or book.

[Middle English quayer, four double sheets of paper, from Old French quaer, from Vulgar Latin *quaternus, from Latin quaternī, set of four, four each, from quater, four times; see kwetwer- in Indo-European roots.]

quire 2

 (kwīr)
n. & v. Archaic
Variant of choir.

quire

(kwaɪə)
n
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a set of 24 or 25 sheets of paper; a twentieth of a ream
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding)
a. four sheets of paper folded once to form a section of 16 pages
b. a section or gathering
3. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a set of all the sheets in a book
[C15 quayer, from Old French quaier, from Latin quaternī four at a time, from quater four times]

quire

(kwaɪə)
n
an obsolete spelling of choir

quire1

(kwaɪər)

n.
1. a set of 24 uniform sheets of paper.
2. Bookbinding. a section of printed leaves in proper sequence after folding; gathering.
[1175–1225; Middle English quayer < Middle French quaier < Vulgar Latin *quaternum set of four sheets]

quire2

(kwaɪər)

n., v.t., v.i. quired, quir•ing.
Archaic. choir.

Quire

 any collection or gathering of leaves in a book or manuscript; a collection of 24 or 25 sheets of paper.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quire - a quantity of paper; 24 or 25 sheets
definite quantity - a specific measure of amount
ream - a quantity of paper; 480 or 500 sheets; one ream equals 20 quires
Translations

quire

[ˈkwaɪəʳ] Nmano f (de papel)

quire

1
n
(= 24 sheets)24 Bogen Papier
(= folded, unbound sheets)Bogen m

quire

[ˈkwaɪəʳ] nventesima parte di una risma (Bookbinding) → segnatura di 16 pagine
References in classic literature ?
Tamoszius had tried to explain to Jurgis what it was all about, but Jurgis, who was not of an imaginative turn, had never quire got it straight; at present he was content with his companion's explanation that the Socialists were the enemies of American institutions--could not be bought, and would not combine or make any sort of a "dicker.
He ask'd, but all the Heav'nly Quire stood mute, And silence was in Heav'n: on mans behalf Patron or Intercessor none appeerd, Much less that durst upon his own head draw The deadly forfeiture, and ransom set.
URIEL, for thou of those seav'n Spirits that stand In sight of God's high Throne, gloriously bright, The first art wont his great authentic will Interpreter through highest Heav'n to bring, Where all his Sons thy Embassie attend; And here art likeliest by supream decree Like honour to obtain, and as his Eye To visit oft this new Creation round; Unspeakable desire to see, and know All these his wondrous works, but chiefly Man, His chief delight and favour, him for whom All these his works so wondrous he ordaind, Hath brought me from the Quires of Cherubim Alone thus wandring.
So Little John clambered awkwardly into the quire, his short gown fluttering gaily; and he called the banns for the marriage of the maid and Allan-a-Dale once, twice, and thrice.
I understand it, that the song be in quire, placed aloft, and accompanied with some broken music; and the ditty fitted to the device.
At thy nativity a glorious quire Of Angels, in the fields of Bethlehem, sung To shepherds, watching at their folds by night, And told them the Messiah now was born, Where they might see him; and to thee they came, Directed to the manger where thou lay'st; For in the inn was left no better room.
For tradition seems correct in naming this monarch as the author of a pretty poem, 'The King's Quair' ('The King's Quire,' that is Book), which relates in a medieval dream allegory of fourteen hundred lines how the captive author sees and falls in love with a lady whom in the end Fortune promises to bestow upon him.
Then I saw that the quotation marks wouldn't do, so I snipped them off, and to make it seem likelier, snipped the whole quire to match.
The Count walked to a writing-table near the window, opened his desk, and took from it several quires of paper and a bundle of quill pens.
We have shed much ink in vain, and wasted quires, that might possibly have been better employed, if it be necessary now to tell the reader that few of the foregoing movements escaped the observation of the experienced trapper.
The name, Quire Sans, derives from the word, quire a medieval printing term that can be traced back to the 15th century for a collection of printed leaves, folded and ready for manuscript binding.
Quire states: "In our departmental discussions, it was noted, that not once in all the years of being affiliated with this partner have we received a single customer complaint.