quizzical

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quiz·zi·cal

 (kwĭz′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Suggesting puzzlement; questioning.
2. Teasing; mocking: "His face wore a somewhat quizzical almost impertinent air" (Lawrence Durrell).
3. Eccentric; odd.

quiz′zi·cal′i·ty (-kăl′ĭ-tē) n.
quiz′zi·cal·ly adv.

quizzical

(ˈkwɪzɪkəl)
adj
questioning and mocking or supercilious: a quizzical look.
ˌquizziˈcality n
ˈquizzically adv

quiz•zi•cal

(ˈkwɪz ɪ kəl)

adj.
1. odd or comical.
2. questioning or puzzled: a quizzical expression on her face.
3. derisively questioning or ridiculing.
[1790–1800]
quiz`zi•cal′i•ty, n.
quiz′zi•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.quizzical - playfully vexing (especially by ridicule)quizzical - playfully vexing (especially by ridicule); "his face wore a somewhat quizzical almost impertinent air"- Lawrence Durrell
playful - full of fun and high spirits; "playful children just let loose from school"
2.quizzical - perplexed (as if being expected to know something that you do not know); "he had a quizzical expression"
perplexed - full of difficulty or confusion or bewilderment; "perplexed language"; "perplexed state of the world"

quizzical

adjective mocking, questioning, inquiring, curious, arch, teasing, bantering, sardonic, derisive, supercilious He gave Robin a mildly quizzical glare.
Translations

quizzical

[ˈkwɪzɪkəl] ADJ [glance] → burlón, socarrón

quizzical

[ˈkwɪzɪkəl] adj [look, glance, smile] → narquois(e)

quizzical

adj
(= knowing, shrewd) air, lookfragend; smilezweifelnd; facewissend, gewitzt
(= odd)eigenartig, drollig

quizzical

[ˈkwɪzɪkl] adj (glance) → interrogativo/a (e beffardo/a)
References in periodicals archive ?
said my wife, as she breezed into the lounge, humorous quizzicality hopping over the lovely turquoise of her eyes.
Indeed, audiences at the Whitechapel Art Gallery initially have little else to go on, experiencing a considerable interlude of rebuffed quizzicality on first entering the galleries, followed by the realization that Rondinone's cryptic installation is aimed less at the mind than at the nervous system.
His own drawings have not a little of Osbert Lancaster on the one hand and John Piper on the other: both with that English combination of deftness, humour and (again) quizzicality.