quoter


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms.
Related to quoter: quotes

quote

 (kwōt)
v. quot·ed, quot·ing, quotes
v.tr.
1.
a. To repeat or copy (words from a source such as a book), usually with acknowledgment of the source: quoted lines from Shakespeare in his lecture.
b. To repeat or copy the words of (a person or a book or other source): likes to quote Shakespeare when giving advice.
c. To cite or refer to for illustration or proof: quoted statistics to show she was right.
2. To repeat a brief passage or excerpt from: The saxophonist quoted a Duke Ellington melody in his solo.
3. To state (a price) for securities, goods, or services.
v.intr.
To give a quotation, as from a book.
n.
1. A quotation.
2. A quotation mark.
3. Used by a speaker to indicate the beginning of a direct quotation: "He paused and said, quote, I don't care, unquote."
4. A dictum; a saying.

[Middle English coten, to mark a book with numbers or marginal references, from Old French coter, from Medieval Latin quotāre, to number chapters, from Latin quotus, of what number, from quot, how many; see kwo- in Indo-European roots.]

quot′er n.
Usage Note: People have been using the noun quote as a truncation of quotation for over one hundred years, and its use in less formal contexts is widespread today. Language critics have objected to this usage, however, as unduly journalistic or breezy, but the word appears to have gained acceptance. In our 2009 survey, 80 percent of the Usage Panel accepted the example He began the chapter with a quote from the Bible. The same percentage accepted He lightened up his talk by throwing in quotes from Marx Brothers movies. These results represent a much higher level of acceptance than in previous surveys. · People sometimes use quote as a synonym for "a dictum; a saying," as in His career is just one more validation of Andy Warhol's quote that "In the future, everybody will be famous for fifteen minutes." A majority of the Panel (albeit a smaller one) accepts this usage, too. In 2009, 60 percent accepted the Andy Warhol example. This is a dramatic increase over the mere 24 percent that accepted the same sentence in 1988.

quoter

(ˈkwəʊtə)
n
a person who (often) quotes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quoter - a communicator (speaker or writer) who uses quotations
communicator - a person who communicates with others
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A potential client who uses the Quoter can fill out a digital application and the agent will be sent a notification.
Please understand," The Telegraph quoter her, as saying.
The Davidsonian account, elaborated by Cappelen and Lepore, handles many cases well; but it fails to accommodate a crucial feature of mixed quotation: that the part enclosed in quotation marks is used to specify not what the quoter says when she utters it, but what the quoted speaker says when she utters it.
There's the rich boy who wants to make his disapproving dad proud, the coward looking for heart, the hot shot realizing war has its costs, the black man aching for acceptance, the jaded vet, the quiet one and the Bible quoter.
The Bag and Film Quoter takes into account the material density and bag dimensions including headers, lip, gusset and trim, etc.
The Bag and Film Quoter also stores and retrieves previous quotes, bag orders, and bag artwork, cataloged by customer, making delivery of new quotes quick and easy, DTR says.
Like Aulus Gellius in Noctes Atticae, Mazzarella is an inveterate quoter of the texts of others, weaving her own reflections around them.
As Emerson observed, "Next to the originator of a good sentence is the first quoter of it.