quoth

quoth

 (kwōth)
tr.v. Archaic
Uttered; said. Used only in the first and third persons, with the subject following: "Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore!'" (Edgar Allan Poe).

[Middle English, from Old English cwǣth, third person sing. past tense of cwethan, to say; see gwet- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

quoth

(kwəʊθ)
vb
archaic (used with all pronouns except: thou and you, and with nouns) another word for said12
[Old English cwæth, third person singular of cwethan to say; related to Old Frisian quetha to say, Old Saxon, Old High German quethan; see bequeath]

quoth

(kwoʊθ)

v. Archaic.
said (used with nouns, and with first- and third-person pronouns, and always placed before the subject): Quoth the raven, “Nevermore.” (E.A. Poe)
[1150–1200; Middle English quethen, Old English cwethan to say, c. Old High German quedan, Old Norse kuetha, Gothic qithan]
Translations

quoth

(archaic) [kwəʊθ] VI quoth Idije yo
quoth hedijo él

quoth

defective vb (obs, hum)sagte, sprach (liter)

quoth

[kwəʊθ] vt quoth hedisse
References in classic literature ?
Take up the tale," quoth Umslopogaas; "it is a merry one.
quoth Gurth; ``expound that to me, Wamba, for my brain is too dull, and my mind too vexed, to read riddles.
Ask your pardon, sir, you would be very wrong," quoth Silver.
His name shall be altered," quoth William Stutely, "And I will his godfather be: Prepare then a feast, and none of the least, For we will be merry," quoth he.
This fresh breeze stirs the blood, my lads," quoth he, "and I would be seeing what the gay world looks like in the direction of Nottingham town.
Now," quoth Robin, "will I go too, for fain would I draw a string for the bright eyes of my lass and a butt of good October brewing.
Now," quoth he, "my bow and eke mine arrows are as good as shine; and moreover, I go to the shooting match at Nottingham Town, which same has been proclaimed by our good Sheriff of Nottinghamshire; there I will shoot with other stout yeomen, for a prize has been offered of a fine butt of ale.
quoth he, "that's for me," and soon rooted it out from beneath the straw.
It would indeed be a bad thing if we had not our brave archers to bring wealth and kindly customs into the country," quoth Dame Eliza, on whom the soldier's free and open ways had made a deep impression.
I fear that you are yet a 'prentice to that trade," quoth the soldier; "for there is no child over the water but could answer what you ask.
Then quoth the King, "If I might catch False and Flattery or any of their masters, I would avenge me on the wretches that work so ill, and would hang them by the neck and all that them abet.
Do you hear there," quoth the squire, "what her ladyship says?