rabble


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rab·ble 1

 (răb′əl)
n.
1. A tumultuous crowd; a mob.
2. The lowest or unrefined class of people. Often used with the.
3. A group of persons regarded with contempt: "After subsisting on the invisible margins of the art scene ... he was 'discovered' in the mid-80's, along with a crowd of like-minded rabble from the East Village" (Richard B. Woodward).

[Middle English.]

rab·ble 2

 (răb′əl)
n.
1. An iron bar used to stir and skim molten iron in puddling.
2. Any of various similar tools or mechanically operated devices used in roasting or refining furnaces.
tr.v. rab·bled, rab·bling, rab·bles
To stir or skim (molten iron) with an iron bar.

[French râble, fire shovel, from Old French roable, from Medieval Latin rotābulum, from Latin rutābulum, from rutus, past participle of ruere, to rake up, tumble down.]

rab′bler n.

rabble

(ˈræbəl)
n
1. a disorderly crowd; mob
2. the rabble derogatory the common people
[C14 (in the sense: a pack of animals): of uncertain origin; perhaps related to Middle Dutch rabbelen to chatter, rattle]

rabble

(ˈræbəl)
n
(Metallurgy) Also called: rabbler an iron tool or mechanical device for stirring, mixing, or skimming a molten charge in a roasting furnace
vb
(Metallurgy) (tr) to stir, mix, or skim (the molten charge) in a roasting furnace
[C17: from French râble, from Latin rutābulum rake for a furnace, from ruere to rake, dig up]

rab•ble1

(ˈræb əl)

n., v. -bled, -bling. n.
1. a disorderly crowd; mob.
2. the rabble, the lower classes; the common people.
v.t.
3. to beset as a rabble does; mob.
[1350–1400; Middle English rabel (n.)]

rab•ble2

(ˈræb əl)

n., v. -bled, -bling. Metall. n.
1. a tool or mechanically operated device used for stirring or mixing a charge in a roasting furnace.
v.t.
2. to stir (a charge) in a roasting furnace.
[1655–65; < French râble fire-shovel, tool, Middle French raable < Latin rutābulum implement for shifting hot coals]
rab′bler, n.

Rabble

 a pack, string, or swarm of animals or insects; a crowd or array of disorderly people, 1513; the low or disorderly part of the populace; a disorderly collection; a confused medley.
Examples: rabble of appetites, passions and opinions, 1768; of bees; of books, 1803; of butterflies; of ceremonies, 1562; of licentious deities, 1741; of discourse, 1656; of dishes; of flies, 1847; of friars, 1560; of gnats; of insects; of monks, 1560; of murderers, 1792; of opinions, 1768; of passions, 1861; of people, 1635; of mean and light persons, 1568; of pictures, 1581; of scholastic precepts, 1589; of priests, 1529; of readers, 1691; of reasons, 1641; of remedies, 1633; of schoolmen, 1671; of strangers, 1840; of uncommanded traditions, 1545; of womenhood, 1847; of words, 1388.

rabble


Past participle: rabbled
Gerund: rabbling

Imperative
rabble
rabble
Present
I rabble
you rabble
he/she/it rabbles
we rabble
you rabble
they rabble
Preterite
I rabbled
you rabbled
he/she/it rabbled
we rabbled
you rabbled
they rabbled
Present Continuous
I am rabbling
you are rabbling
he/she/it is rabbling
we are rabbling
you are rabbling
they are rabbling
Present Perfect
I have rabbled
you have rabbled
he/she/it has rabbled
we have rabbled
you have rabbled
they have rabbled
Past Continuous
I was rabbling
you were rabbling
he/she/it was rabbling
we were rabbling
you were rabbling
they were rabbling
Past Perfect
I had rabbled
you had rabbled
he/she/it had rabbled
we had rabbled
you had rabbled
they had rabbled
Future
I will rabble
you will rabble
he/she/it will rabble
we will rabble
you will rabble
they will rabble
Future Perfect
I will have rabbled
you will have rabbled
he/she/it will have rabbled
we will have rabbled
you will have rabbled
they will have rabbled
Future Continuous
I will be rabbling
you will be rabbling
he/she/it will be rabbling
we will be rabbling
you will be rabbling
they will be rabbling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been rabbling
you have been rabbling
he/she/it has been rabbling
we have been rabbling
you have been rabbling
they have been rabbling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been rabbling
you will have been rabbling
he/she/it will have been rabbling
we will have been rabbling
you will have been rabbling
they will have been rabbling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been rabbling
you had been rabbling
he/she/it had been rabbling
we had been rabbling
you had been rabbling
they had been rabbling
Conditional
I would rabble
you would rabble
he/she/it would rabble
we would rabble
you would rabble
they would rabble
Past Conditional
I would have rabbled
you would have rabbled
he/she/it would have rabbled
we would have rabbled
you would have rabbled
they would have rabbled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rabble - a disorderly crowd of peoplerabble - a disorderly crowd of people  
crowd - a large number of things or people considered together; "a crowd of insects assembled around the flowers"
lynch mob - a mob that kills a person for some presumed offense without legal authority
2.rabble - disparaging terms for the common people
common people, folk, folks - people in general (often used in the plural); "they're just country folk"; "folks around here drink moonshine"; "the common people determine the group character and preserve its customs from one generation to the next"
scum, trash - worthless people

rabble

noun
1. mob, crowd, herd, swarm, horde, throng, canaille a rabble of gossip columnists
2. (Derogatory) commoners, proletariat, common people, riffraff, crowd, masses, trash (chiefly U.S. & Canad.), scum, lower classes, populace, peasantry, dregs, hoi polloi, the great unwashed (derogatory), canaille, lumpenproletariat, commonalty They are forced to socialise with the rabble.
commoners elite, upper classes, aristocracy, nobility, bourgeoisie, gentry, high society

rabble

noun
A group of persons regarded as the lowest class:
Slang: scum.
Idioms: scum of the earth, tag and rag, the great unwashed.
Translations
رَعاع، غَوْغاء
dav
hob
csőcselék
skríll, múgur
triukšminga minia
drūzmapūlis
ayaktakımıdüzensiz kalabalık

rabble

[ˈræbl] N (= disorderly crowd) → gentío m, muchedumbre f, mogollón m (Sp)
the rabble (= uncultured people) → la chusma
a rabble ofuna multitud turbulenta de

rabble

[ˈræbəl] n (pejorative)populace frabble-rousing [ˈræbəlraʊzɪŋ] n
Critics have accused him of rabble-rousing → Ses détracteurs l'ont accusé de fomenter des troubles.

rabble

n (= disorderly crowd)lärmende Menge, lärmender Haufen (inf); (pej: = lower classes) → Pöbel m

rabble

:
rabble-rouser
nHetzer(in), Volksverhetzer(in) m(f)
rabble-rousing
nHetze f, → Volksverhetzung f
adj(auf)hetzerisch

rabble

[ˈræbl] nconfusione f di gente
the rabble (pej) → il popolino, la plebaglia

rabble

(ˈrӕbl) noun
a noisy, disorderly crowd.
References in classic literature ?
Life is a well of delight; but where the rabble also drink, there all fountains are poisoned.
The rabble by shouting and noise having increased their numbers to several thousands, they began with Sir Patrick Johnston, who was one of the treaters, and the year before had been Lord Provost.
Had the acute-angled rabble been all, without exception, absolutely destitute of hope and of ambition, they might have found leaders in some of their many seditious outbreaks, so able as to render their superior numbers and strength too much even for the wisdom of the Circles.
Up there is the rabble of the wood, continued she, pointing to several laths which were fastened before a hole high up in the wall; "that's the rabble; they would all fly away immediately, if they were not well fastened in.
Now, to think of these vagabonds,' said he, 'attracting the young rabble from a model school.
the beast has very justly kicked one of the rabble over -- and another -- and another -- and another.
The essential point is that without seeing her you must believe, confess, affirm, swear, and defend it; else ye have to do with me in battle, ill-conditioned, arrogant rabble that ye are; and come ye on, one by one as the order of knighthood requires, or all together as is the custom and vile usage of your breed, here do I bide and await you relying on the justice of the cause I maintain.
Really this wretched rabble has driven me to extremities.
After dinner it was whispered in town there would be a mob at night, and that Paxton, Hallowell, the custom-house, and admiralty officers' houses would be attacked; but my friends assured me that the rabble were satisfied with the insult I had received and that I was become rather popular.
But just as the wedding was going to be solemnized, old Mr Fox stirred under the bench, and cudgelled all the rabble, and drove them and Mrs Fox out of the house.
And as he descended the winding stairs of the courts: "A fine rabble of asses and dolts these Parisians
And the same sun, yellow and pale, as it behooves a Dutch sun to be, was shining in the skies; and the same grated window looked down upon him from the Buytenhof; and the same rabble, no longer yelling, but completely thunderstruck, were staring at him from the streets below.