raccoon

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rac·coon

also ra·coon  (ră-ko͞on′)
n. pl. rac·coons or raccoon also ra·coons or racoon
1. An omnivorous mammal (Procyon lotor) native to the Americas and introduced elsewhere, having grayish-brown fur, black masklike facial markings, and a black-ringed bushy tail.
2. The fur of this mammal.
3. Any of various similar or related animals.

[Of Virginia Algonquian origin.]

raccoon

(rəˈkuːn) or

racoon

n, pl -coons or -coon
1. (Animals) any omnivorous mammal of the genus Procyon, esp P. lotor (North American raccoon), inhabiting forests of North and Central America and the Caribbean: family Procyonidae, order Carnivora (carnivores). Raccoons have a pointed muzzle, long tail, and greyish-black fur with black bands around the tail and across the face
2. (Textiles) the fur of the North American raccoon
[C17: from Algonquian ärähkun, from ärähkuněm he scratches with his hands]

rac•coon

(ræˈkun)

n., pl. -coons, (esp. collectively) -coon.
1. any small, nocturnal carnivore of the genus Procyon, esp. P. lotor, having a masklike black stripe across the eyes and a bushy, ringed tail, native to North and Central America.
2. the thick, brownish gray fur of this animal.
[1608, Amer.; < Virginia Algonquian aroughcun]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.raccoon - the fur of the North American racoonraccoon - the fur of the North American racoon
fur, pelt - the dressed hairy coat of a mammal
2.raccoon - an omnivorous nocturnal mammal native to North America and Central Americaraccoon - an omnivorous nocturnal mammal native to North America and Central America
procyonid - plantigrade carnivorous mammals
genus Procyon, Procyon - the type genus of the family Procyonidae: raccoons
crab-eating raccoon, Procyon cancrivorus - a South American raccoon
Translations
mýval
vaskebjørn
pesukarhu
rakun
mosómedve
rakun
òvottabjörn
アライグマ
너구리
meškėnas
jenots
medvedík čistotný
rakun
tvättbjörn
แรคคูน
gấu trúc Mỹ

raccoon

[rəˈkuːn] N (raccoon or raccoons (pl)) → mapache m

raccoon

racoon [rəˈkuːn] nraton m laveur

raccoon

[rəˈkuːn] nprocione m, orsetto lavatore

raccoon,

racoon

(rəˈkuːn) , ((American) rӕ-) noun
a type of small, furry, North American animal, with a striped, bushy tail.

raccoon

راكُون mýval vaskebjørn Waschbär ρακούν mapache pesukarhu raton laveur rakun procione アライグマ 너구리 wasbeer vaskebjørn szop guaxinim, racum енот tvättbjörn แรคคูน rakun gấu trúc Mỹ 浣熊

raccoon

n mapache m
References in classic literature ?
The coat in itself was a very good one, it kept me warm; but it was wadded and it had a raccoon collar which was the height of vulgarity.
From Commodore Porter he received the alarming intelligence that the British frigate Phoebe, with a store-ship mounted with battering pieces, calculated to attack forts, had arrived at Rio Janeiro, where she had been joined by the sloops of war Cherub and Raccoon, and that they had all sailed in company on the 6th of July for the Pacific, bound, as it was supposed, to Columbia River.
I SEE quite a number of rings on your tail," said an Alderman to a Raccoon that he met in a zoological garden.
Yes," replied the Raccoon, "and I hear quite a number of tales on your ring.
Neither were the schooner captains believed when they reported seeing, on cold winter mornings, a man swimming in the tide-rips of Raccoon Straits or in the swift currents between Goat island and Angel Island miles from shore.
I formerly saw the raccoon in the woods behind where my house is built, and probably still heard their whinnering at night.
In 2005, hunters and cars killed 10 times as many raccoons as a decade earlier, according to the official statistics.
These Americans, however, are not two-footed CIA agents, but four-footed raccoons.
When raccoons become pests, we usually have to point the finger at ourselves.
All found it to prevent rats and even raccoons from getting into the garbage, and today more than 1 million bags a week are being sold.
Raccoon dogs are indigenous to Asia, including eastern Siberia and Japan, and are sometimes called Asiatic raccoons, Finn raccoons, or tanuki.
Los Angeles Animal Services chief Ed Boks' compassion for dangerously aggressive packs of raccoons is only matched by his cavalier attitude toward the Venice resident they are terrorizing.