raclette


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ra·clette

 (rä-klĕt′, ră-)
n.
1. A Swiss dish consisting of cheese melted and served on boiled potatoes or bread.
2. A firm cheese used in making this dish.

[French, from racler, to rake, scrape, from Provençal rasclar, to rake, from Old Provençal, from Vulgar Latin *rāsculāre, from *rāsculum, diminutive of Latin rāstrum, rake; see rēd- in Indo-European roots.]

raclette

(ræˈklɛt)
n
(Cookery) a Swiss dish of melted cheese served on boiled potatoes
[C20: from French, from racler to scrape, because the cheese is traditionally melted and scraped onto a plate]
Translations

raclette

n (Cook) → Raclette f or nt
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References in periodicals archive ?
They sourced the gadget - a raclette - to sell to UK customers, initially using their garages, attics and front rooms to store products.
At the time, the product - a raclette - was available in Europe but not in the UK and so they set about bringing it to the market, initially using their garages, attics and front rooms for storage.
Menu additions include Swiss raclette (melted cheese with potatoes) and Austrian schnitzel.
The signature raclette (gooey, fire-melted cheese served with potatoes and cured meats) will make you want to linger well after the frost has disappeared from your nose.
There's a French flavour to the pretty cobbled streets, as we find apres ski shacks serving not only poutine (a Canadian staple of French fries topped with gravy and curd cheese) but also real French onion soup and Savoyard fare, including raclette and fondue, creme brulee and other Gallic delicacies.
For example, in their recent league match with Luzern, Sion laid on a luxury spread of locally-produced white wine and raclette cheese rather than the usual beer and sausage available and gave the visitors free admission.
released its Fall/Winter 2014 Catalog featuring Meltables, two new Artisan Rubs, the Ceramic Serrated Knife, the Ceramic Peeler, and the Raclette Store & Go.
Delicious duck, beef and raclette was served up in the Finnish chalet around the blazing fire, which was used to cook it in front of us.
As for the food, first up was Raclette – a cheese dish made by melting the edge of huge rounds of cheese in front of the open fire then scraping the melted cheese off, which is then eaten with potatoes, bread and pickles.
The only way to celebrate that morning was a lunch at Zugenhutti, with spectacular views from the sun terrace, and speciality raclette for the ravenous at around PS15.
In Manchester my favourite Raclette stall is missing but there's Italian pasta, paella, Dutch cheese, baklava and the ever-popular roast pork baps.
We also sup on raclette and steak tartare at Le Bistrot des Cimes, a restaurant that oozes so much rustic French charm that it almost drowns out the chorus of English voices I hear at every turn.