radiation


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Related to radiation: electromagnetic radiation, Radiation poisoning

ra·di·a·tion

 (rā′dē-ā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of radiating: the radiation of heat and light from a fire.
2. Physics
a. Emission or propagation of energy in the form of waves or particles.
b. Energy radiated or transmitted in the form of waves or particles.
c. A stream of particles or electromagnetic waves emitted by the atoms and molecules of a radioactive substance as a result of nuclear decay.
3.
a. The act of exposing or the condition of being exposed to such energy.
b. The application of such energy, as in medical treatment.
4. Anatomy Radial arrangement of parts, as of a group of nerve fibers connecting different areas of the brain.
5. Adaptive radiation

ra′di·a′tion·al, ra′di·a′tive adj.

radiation

(ˌreɪdɪˈeɪʃən)
n
1. (General Physics) physics
a. the emission or transfer of radiant energy as particles, electromagnetic waves, sound, etc
b. the particles, etc, emitted, esp the particles and gamma rays emitted in nuclear decay
2. (Medicine) med Also called: radiation therapy treatment using a radioactive substance
3. (Anatomy) anatomy a group of nerve fibres that diverge from their common source
4. (Biology) See adaptive radiation
5. the act, state, or process of radiating or being radiated
6. (Surveying) surveying the fixing of points around a central plane table by using an alidade and measuring tape
ˌradiˈational adj

ra•di•a•tion

(ˌreɪ diˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
1.
a. the process in which energy is emitted as particles or waves.
b. the complete process in which energy is emitted by one body, transmitted through an intervening medium or space, and absorbed by another body.
c. the energy transferred by these processes.
2. the act or process of radiating.
3. something that is radiated.
4. radial arrangement of parts.
[1545–55; < Latin radiātiō gleam. See radiate, -tion]
ra`di•a′tion•al, adj.
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radiation
As the nucleus of a radioactive element decays, it releases alpha particles, beta particles, or gamma rays. Alpha rays (a stream of alpha particles) are the weakest form of radiation and can be stopped by paper. Beta rays (a stream of beta particles) are able to pass through paper but not through aluminum. Gamma rays (a form of electromagnetic radiation) are the strongest. They are able to pass through paper and aluminum, but not through a block of lead or concrete.

ra·di·a·tion

(rā′dē-ā′shən)
1.
a. Energy in the form of electromagnetic waves or streams of particles, such as photons or electrons. Radiation is given off by nuclear reactions (as in fission) and by radioactive decay.
b. The emission or movement of such energy through space or a medium, such as air. See Notes at conduction, electromagnetic radiation.
2. The use of such energy, especially x-rays, in medical diagnosis and treatment.

Radiation

See also physics.

radiotherapy.
the record produced by a bolometer.
a device used in bolometry.
the measurement of minute amounts of radiant energy, especially infrared spectra. — bolometrist, n.bolometric, adj.
radioscopy.
the capacity to transmit infrared radiation. — diathermanous, adj.
a device, carried or worn by people working near radiation for measuring the amount of radiation to which they are exposed.
the measurement by a dosimeter of the dosage of radiation a person might have received. See also drugs. — dosimetrist, n.dosimetric, dosimetrical adj.
an instrument for measuring the emission of radiation in the form of visible light and identifying the substance that is its source. — fluorometric, adj.
the measurement of fluorescence, or visible radiation, by means of a fluorometer. — fluorometric, adj.
an examination by means of a screen coated with a fluorescent substance responsive to radiation from x rays. — fluoroscopic, adj.
the study of metals and their structures and properties by the use of microscopy and x rays.
the science or technique of making x-ray photographs of the kidneys, renal pelves, and ureters, using injection of opaque solutions or radiopaque dyes. — pyelographic, adj.
the sensitivity of some humans to radiation of various kinds, as in water divining or nonmedical diagnosis. — radiesthetic, adj.
the state, property, or process of being radioactive.
the production of photographic images on film using radiation from other radioactive substances instead of light. Also called x-ray scotography, shadowgraphy. — radiograph, radiographer, n.radiographic, radiographical, adj.
1. the science that studies x rays or radiation from radioactive substances, esp. for medical purposes.
2. the examination or photographing of parts of the body with such rays.
3. the interpretation of the resulting photographs. — radiologist, n.radiologie, radiological, adj.
the study of metals and their structures by the use of x rays.
the study or observation of the inner structure of opaque materials by means of x rays or other radioactive substances. Also called curiescopy.
sensitivity to the effects of radiation, as of parts of the body. Also called radiosensitivity.
radiosensibility. — radiosensitive, adj.
the science and technology of applying radiation and x rays to industrial use. See also radio.
a method of treating diseases with x rays or the radiation from other radioactive substances. Also called actinotherapy. — radiotherapist, n.radiotherapeutic, adj.
1. the treatment of disease with x rays or roentgen rays.
2. the effect of misuse or overexposure to these rays.
an x-ray photograph.
x-ray photography.
a radiograph.
radiography.
x-ray photography of a selected plane of the body by a method that eliminates the outline of structures in other planes. — tomographic, adj.
a process of recording x-ray images by electrostatic means. — xeroradiographic, adj.
radiography.

radiation

Electromagnetic and radioactive energy emitted as rays, waves, or particles.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radiation - energy that is radiated or transmitted in the form of rays or waves or particlesradiation - energy that is radiated or transmitted in the form of rays or waves or particles
ionizing radiation - high-energy radiation capable of producing ionization in substances through which it passes
cosmic radiation - radiation coming from outside the solar system
electromagnetic radiation, electromagnetic wave, nonparticulate radiation - radiation consisting of waves of energy associated with electric and magnetic fields resulting from the acceleration of an electric charge
energy, free energy - (physics) a thermodynamic quantity equivalent to the capacity of a physical system to do work; the units of energy are joules or ergs; "energy can take a wide variety of forms"
solar radiation - radiation from the sun
2.radiation - the act of spreading outward from a central source
bombardment - the act (or an instance) of subjecting a body or substance to the impact of high-energy particles (as electrons or alpha rays)
emission, emanation - the act of emitting; causing to flow forth
3.radiation - syndrome resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation (e.g., exposure to radioactive chemicals or to nuclear explosions); low doses cause diarrhea and nausea and vomiting and sometimes loss of hair; greater exposure can cause sterility and cataracts and some forms of cancer and other diseases; severe exposure can cause death within hours; "he was suffering from radiation"
syndrome - a pattern of symptoms indicative of some disease
4.radiation - the spontaneous emission of a stream of particles or electromagnetic rays in nuclear decay
corpuscular radiation, particulate radiation - a stream of atomic or subatomic particles that may be charged positively (e.g. alpha particles) or negatively (e.g. beta particles) or not at all (e.g. neutrons)
emission - the release of electrons from parent atoms
5.radiation - the spread of a group of organisms into new habitats
adaptive radiation - the development of many different forms from an originally homogeneous group of organisms as they fill different ecological niches
spread, spreading - process or result of distributing or extending over a wide expanse of space
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
6.radiation - a radial arrangement of nerve fibers connecting different parts of the brain
neural structure - a structure that is part of the nervous system
7.radiation - (medicine) the treatment of disease (especially cancer) by exposure to a radioactive substanceradiation - (medicine) the treatment of disease (especially cancer) by exposure to a radioactive substance
therapy - (medicine) the act of caring for someone (as by medication or remedial training etc.); "the quarterback is undergoing treatment for a knee injury"; "he tried every treatment the doctors suggested"; "heat therapy gave the best relief"
phototherapy - the use of strong light to treat acne or hyperbilirubinemia of the newborn
Curietherapy, radium therapy - the use of radium in radiation therapy
X-ray therapy - the therapeutic use of X rays
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques

radiation

noun emission, rays, emanation They study energy radiation from the most violent stars in the universe.
Translations
إِشْعَاعإشْعاع
radiacevyzařování
stråling
säteily
radijacijazračenje
geislun
放射
복사
vyžarovanie
sevanje
strålning
รังสี
sự bức xạ

radiation

[ˌreɪdɪˈeɪʃən]
A. Nradiación f
B. CPD radiation sickness Nenfermedad f por radiación
radiation therapy Nradioterapia f, terapia f por radiaciones
radiation treatment Ntratamiento m por radiaciones

radiation

[ˌreɪdiˈeɪʃən]
n
(from the sun, electronic equipment, nuclear bombs)radiations fpl
Can the radiation from mobile phones be harmful to humans? → Les radiations des téléphones portables sont-elles nocives?
[heat, energy] → rayonnement m
(also radiation therapy) → radiothérapie f
modif [exposure] → aux radiations; [leak] → de radiations
radiation levels → niveaux mpl de radiationradiation sickness nmal m des rayonsradiation treatment nradiothérapie f

radiation

n (of heat etc)(Aus)strahlung f; (= rays)radioaktive Strahlung; contaminated by or with radiationverstrahlt, strahlenverseucht; exposure to radiationStrahlenbelastung f; radiation levelStrahlenbelastung f; radiation therapy or treatmentStrahlenbehandlung f; radiation damage/injuriesStrahlenschäden pl

radiation

[ˌreɪdɪˈeɪʃn] n (nuclear) → radiazione f; (of heat) → irradiamento

radiate

(ˈreidieit) verb
1. to send out rays of (light, heat etc). A fire radiates heat.
2. to go out or be sent out in rays, or in many directions from a central point. Heat radiates from a fire; All the roads radiate from the centre of the town.
ˌradiˈation noun
rays of light, heat etc or of any radioactive substance.
ˈradiator noun
1. a type of apparatus for heating a room.
2. an apparatus in a car which, with a fan, cools the engine.

radiation

إِشْعَاع radiace stråling Strahlung ακτινοβολία radiación säteily rayonnement radijacija radiazione 放射 복사 straling stråling promieniowanie radiação радиация strålning รังสี radyasyon sự bức xạ 辐射

ra·di·a·tion

n. radiación.
1. emisión de materiales o partículas radioactivas;
2. propagación de energía;
3. emisión de rayos desde un centro común;
___ dosagedosis de ___;
___ hazardsriesgos y peligros causados por una ___;
___ therapyradioterapia;
electromagnetic ______ electromagnética;
infrared ______ por rayos infrarrojos;
ionizing ______ ionizante;
ultraviolet ______ de rayos ultravioleta.

radiation

n radiación f; ionizing — radiación ionizante
References in classic literature ?
I know a little of the principle of design, and I know this thing was not arranged on any laws of radiation, or alternation, or repetition, or symmetry, or anything else that I ever heard of.
There is one end of the room where it is almost intact, and there, when the crosslights fade and the low sun shines directly upon it, I can almost fancy radiation after all,--the interminable grotesques seem to form around a common centre and rush off in headlong plunges of equal distraction.
And thus, as a closer and still closer intimacy admitted me more unreservedly into the recesses of his spirit, the more bitterly did I perceive the futility of all attempt at cheering a mind from which darkness, as if an inherent positive quality, poured forth upon all objects of the moral and physical universe, in one unceasing radiation of gloom.
But luckily the dull radiation arrested him before he could burn his hands on the still-glowing metal.
The raw bacon which clumsy Molly spares from her own scanty store that she may carry it to her neighbour's child to "stop the fits," may be a piteously inefficacious remedy; but the generous stirring of neighbourly kindness that prompted the deed has a beneficent radiation that is not lost.
The muse herself betrays her son, and enhances the gifts of wealth and well-born beauty by a radiation out of the air, and clouds, and forests that skirt the road,--a certain haughty favor, as if from patrician genii to patricians, a kind of aristocracy in nature, a prince of the power of the air.
On the six days of the week there is an atmosphere of quiet humor, a radiation of genial common-sense, about Scotchmen in general, which is simply delightful to feel.
This temperature is only the temperature produced by the radiation of the stars; that is to say, what the terrestrial globe would undergo if the sun disappeared one day.
On the northern continents, the winter is rendered excessively cold by the radiation from a large area of land into a clear sky, nor is it moderated by the warmth-bringing currents of the sea; the short summer, on the other hand, is hot.
The best of beauty is a finer charm than skill in surfaces, in outlines, or rules of art can ever teach, namely a radiation from the work of art of human character,--a wonderful expression through stone, or canvas, or musical sound, of the deepest and simplest attributes of our nature, and therefore most intelligible at last to those souls which have these attributes.
This light, subdued and colored, seemed almost a radiation from the trunks themselves, so strongly did they saturate it with their hue.
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