radicle

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rad·i·cle

 (răd′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. Botany The part of a plant embryo that develops into a root.
2. Anatomy A small structure, such as a fibril of a nerve, that resembles a root.

[Latin rādīcula, diminutive of rādīx, rādīc-, root; see wrād- in Indo-European roots.]

radicle

(ˈrædɪkəl)
n
1. (Botany) botany
a. part of the embryo of seed-bearing plants that develops into the main root
b. a very small root or rootlike part
2. (Anatomy) anatomy any bodily structure resembling a rootlet, esp one of the smallest branches of a vein or nerve
3. (Chemistry) chem a variant spelling of radical11
[C18: from Latin rādīcula a little root, from rādīx root]

rad•i•cle

(ˈræd ɪ kəl)

n.
1. Bot. an embryonic root.
2. Anat. a small rootlike part or structure, as the beginning of a nerve or vein.
[1665–75; < Latin rādīcula small root =rādīc- (s. of rādīx) root1 + -ula -ule]
ra•dic•u•lar (rəˈdɪk yə lər) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radicle - (anatomy) a small structure resembling a rootlet (such as a fibril of a nerve)radicle - (anatomy) a small structure resembling a rootlet (such as a fibril of a nerve)
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
nerve, nervus - any bundle of nerve fibers running to various organs and tissues of the body
anatomy, general anatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animals
Translations

radicle

[ˈrædɪkl] N (Bot) → radícula f (Chem) → radical m

radicle

n (Bot) → Keimwurzel f; (= small root)Würzelchen nt; (Chem) → Radikal nt

radicle

[ˈrædɪkl] n
a. (Bot) → radichetta
b. (Math, Chem) = radical b

rad·i·cle

n. radícula, estructura semejante a una raíz.
References in classic literature ?
The same fact holds good with flowering plants, of which the two main divisions have been founded on characters derived from the embryo,--on the number and position of the embryonic leaves or cotyledons, and on the mode of development of the plumule and radicle.
The soil, it appears, is suited to the seed, for it has sent its radicle downward, and it may now send its shoot upward also with confidence.
The allelopathic stress induced in radish a stimulation of PAL activity in the same range for the two kinds of extracts particularly in growing organs and in a more pronounced way in radicles (Figure 7)
Seed imbibition using priming technology is one organic strategy in which the hydric conditions initiate the mechanisms essential to seed germination, but it does not induce the protrusion of radicles.
Priming consists in wetting seeds to the moisture level that enables early processes leading to germination but is too low for radicles to emerge.
Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) showed mild dilatation of intrahepatic biliary radicles, dilated tortuous cystic duct and dilated CBD with two small stones at its distal part measured about 6 x 6 and 3 x 2 mm, Figure 3.
The length of hypocotyls, radicals, leaves area, and leaf succulent were measured according to the method described by Li [42] The fresh weights (FW) of leaves, hypocotyls and radicles were measured followed by oven dried at 70[degrees]C for 72 h following the measurement of dry weight (DW) [56].
nana and designation of peat units and subfossil plant communities Core Depth, Description of plant remains cm TII 270-300 Radicles of Carex sp.
The emergence of shoots and radicles with at least 2mm in length was scored up to 50 days.
Subsequent MRI with MRCP (Figure 1) showed a definite lesion in the confluence of right and left major bile ducts with extension in to the left duct to involve secondary biliary radicles on that side, consistent with Type-3b Klatskin tumour according to Bismuth classification.