rai

(redirected from radioactive iodine)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Related to radioactive iodine: radioactive iodine uptake

rai

 (rī)
n.
A form of popular Algerian music combining traditional Arabic vocal styles with various elements of popular Western music and featuring outspoken, often controversial lyrics.

[Algerian French raï, perhaps from dialectal Arabic (ha er-)ray, (here is the) view (frequently heard in the songs), from Arabic ra'y, view, from ra'ā, to observe; see rʔy in Semitic roots.]

rai

(raɪ)
n
(Pop Music) a type of Algerian popular music based on traditional Algerian music influenced by modern Western pop
[C20: Arabic, literally: opinion]

rai

(raɪ)
n.
a style of Algerian popular music played on electric guitar, synthesizer, and percussion instruments.
[1985–90; of uncertain orig.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Lenvatinib was approved in Europe in May 2015 as a treatment for adults with progressive, locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (papillary, follicular or Hrthle cell), refractory to radioactive iodine.
Containment is crucial since radioactive iodine decays very slowly and will linger in the environment for millions of years.
In a phase II study of selumetinib in patients with advanced thyroid cancer, clinically meaningful increases in iodine uptake and retention were observed in patients with thyroid cancer that was refractory to radioactive iodine.
Increased exposure to radioactive iodine has been said to increase the risk of cancer and thyroid disorders.
Now a new study led by a consultant at Newcastle's Freeman hospital has identified that giving some patients a lower dose of radioactive iodine has similar treatment success to the current higher dose, with fewer side effects.
Ingestion of potassium iodide tablets is a proven strategy to reduce the risk associated with exposure to radioactive iodine.
Martin Ferguson was banned from court because his treatment with radioactive iodine meant he could contaminate other people.
There are three different therapies that can be utilized: medical management with antithyroid drugs, surgery or radioactive iodine.
The use of radioactive iodine after surgery for different stages of thyroid cancer has increased from 40% to 56% from 1990-2008, with wide variation in use of this treatment among hospitals.
The guidelines address in specific detail initial evaluation and management of thyrotoxicosis; management of Graves' hyperthyroidism using radioactive iodine, antithyroid drugs, or surgery; management of toxic multinodular goiter or toxic adenoma using radioactive iodine or surgery; Graves' disease in children, adolescents, or pregnant patients; sub-clinical hyperthyroidism; hyperthyroidism in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy; and management of other miscellaneous causes of thyrotoxicosis.
The guidelines address in detail initial evaluation and management of thyrotoxicosis; management of Graves' hyperthyroidism using radioactive iodine, antithyroid drugs, or surgery; management of toxic multinodular goiter or toxic adenoma using radioactive iodine or surgery; Graves" disease in children, adolescents, or pregnant patients; subclinical hyperthyroidism; hyperthyroidism in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy; and management of other miscellaneous causes of thyrotoxicosis.
But assuming radioactive iodine behaves similarly to the non-radioactive type, there is every reason to believe it will work.