radon


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ra·don

 (rā′dŏn)
n. Symbol Rn
A colorless, radioactive, inert gaseous element that is formed by the radioactive decay of radium and is used to produce neutrons for research. Its most stable isotope is Rn-222 with a half-life of 3.82 days. A natural source of radiation found in most soils and groundwater, radon poses a serious health threat if inhaled. Atomic number 86; melting point -71°C; boiling point -61.7°C; density of gas 9.73 grams per liter; specific gravity (solid) 4. See Periodic Table.

radon

(ˈreɪdɒn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a colourless radioactive element of the rare gas group, the most stable isotope of which, radon-222, is a decay product of radium. It is used as an alpha particle source in radiotherapy. Symbol: Rn; atomic no: 86; half-life of 222Rn: 3.82 days; valency: 0; density: 9.73 kg/m3; melting pt: –71°C; boiling pt: –61.7°C
[C20: from radium + -on]

ra•don

(ˈreɪ dɒn)

n.
a chemically inert, radioactive gaseous element produced by the decay of radium: emissions produced by outgassing of rock, brick, etc., are a health hazard. Symbol: Rn; at. no.: 86; at. wt.: 222.
[< German Radon (1918); see radium, -on2]

ra·don

(rā′dŏn)
Symbol Rn A colorless, odorless, radioactive element that is a noble gas. It is produced by the radioactive decay of radium and occurs in minute amounts in soil, rocks, and the air near the ground. Radon is used as a source of radiation for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Its most stable isotope has a half-life of about four days. Atomic number 86. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radon - a radioactive gaseous element formed by the disintegration of radiumradon - a radioactive gaseous element formed by the disintegration of radium; the heaviest of the inert gasses; occurs naturally (especially in areas over granite) and is considered a hazard to health
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
argonon, inert gas, noble gas - any of the chemically inert gaseous elements of the helium group in the periodic table
Translations
رادون
радон
radon
radon
radono
radoon
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radon
ラドン
radon
rádon
radon
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радон
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radon

[ˈreɪdɒn] N (also radon gas) → radón m

radon

[ˈreɪdɒn] nradon m

radon

n (Chem) → Radon nt

ra·don

n. radón, elemento radiactivo gaseoso.

radon

n radón m
References in periodicals archive ?
Several factors can increase radon levels in the winter months, allowing specialists to accurately assess the risks to homeowners.
Radon exposure may pose a risk during the entire year, but it's during the cold winter months when our houses are shut tight to retain heat that radon is most likely to accumulate.
The Lake County Health Department and Community Health Center is urging residents to test the radon levels in their homes and apartments during the winter months, when indoor radon levels are at their highest.
With the exception of those with high occupational exposures, the residential environment is the most important source of radon exposure for the majority of people (Pershagen et al.
Environmental Protection Agency radon expert Dr David Fenton said: "This is a radioactive gas that has no colour, taste or smell so your senses are blind to it.
Researcher in Trinity's School of Natural Sciences Javier Elio said: "We estimate approximately 19% of homes in high risk areas will have indoor radon concentrations higher than the national reference level and remedial action should be taken.
This clearly indicates that the technique of soil air radon measurement can effectively be used as a realistic tool in the detection, characterization and mapping of the on surface and buried active geological faults.
Radon is a colorless and odorless radioactive gas that can cause severe damage to human body (Lamonaca et al.
Using five years of data from 2010-2014, the agency created interactive county radon maps and charts designed to educate residents about radon levels in their communities.
Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas formed from the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water.
Radon and its radioactive daughters are recognized as a proven human carcinogen by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).
Combining our resources will save American lives by magnifying our effectiveness in preventing exposure to radon in homes and schools," says EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy.