radon


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ra·don

 (rā′dŏn)
n. Symbol Rn
A colorless, radioactive, inert gaseous element that is formed by the radioactive decay of radium and is used to produce neutrons for research. Its most stable isotope is Rn-222 with a half-life of 3.82 days. A natural source of radiation found in most soils and groundwater, radon poses a serious health threat if inhaled. Atomic number 86; melting point -71°C; boiling point -61.7°C; density of gas 9.73 grams per liter; specific gravity (solid) 4. See Periodic Table.

radon

(ˈreɪdɒn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a colourless radioactive element of the rare gas group, the most stable isotope of which, radon-222, is a decay product of radium. It is used as an alpha particle source in radiotherapy. Symbol: Rn; atomic no: 86; half-life of 222Rn: 3.82 days; valency: 0; density: 9.73 kg/m3; melting pt: –71°C; boiling pt: –61.7°C
[C20: from radium + -on]

ra•don

(ˈreɪ dɒn)

n.
a chemically inert, radioactive gaseous element produced by the decay of radium: emissions produced by outgassing of rock, brick, etc., are a health hazard. Symbol: Rn; at. no.: 86; at. wt.: 222.
[< German Radon (1918); see radium, -on2]

ra·don

(rā′dŏn)
Symbol Rn A colorless, odorless, radioactive element that is a noble gas. It is produced by the radioactive decay of radium and occurs in minute amounts in soil, rocks, and the air near the ground. Radon is used as a source of radiation for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Its most stable isotope has a half-life of about four days. Atomic number 86. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radon - a radioactive gaseous element formed by the disintegration of radiumradon - a radioactive gaseous element formed by the disintegration of radium; the heaviest of the inert gasses; occurs naturally (especially in areas over granite) and is considered a hazard to health
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
argonon, inert gas, noble gas - any of the chemically inert gaseous elements of the helium group in the periodic table
Translations
رادون
радон
radon
radon
radono
radoon
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ラドン
radon
rádon
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radon

[ˈreɪdɒn] N (also radon gas) → radón m

radon

[ˈreɪdɒn] nradon m

radon

n (Chem) → Radon nt

ra·don

n. radón, elemento radiactivo gaseoso.

radon

n radón m
References in periodicals archive ?
Combining our resources will save American lives by magnifying our effectiveness in preventing exposure to radon in homes and schools, said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy.
The county groups of most interest--high, low, and no Marcellus activity--show a difference in adjusted geometric mean indoor radon concentration of < 0.
In 2013, we began a study of the scope and extent of regular and standard radon testing programs in schools across the nation.
According to Environmental Protection Agency, January 2015 is National Radon Action Month.
Surgeon General issued a health advisory in January, 2005 stating that exposure to elevated levels of indoor radon causes lung cancer and recommended that every home in the United States be tested.
Radon can enter and collect inside almost any home or other building through dirt floors, hollow block walls, cracks in the foundation floor and walls, sump pumps, openings around floor drains, joints and foundation openings for pipes, sewers and other utility connections.
As it can be seen in the radon decay chain, number of alpha particles emitted in this chain is high and given that alpha particle considered as one of the most dangerous particles resulted from decays so this gas can be considered as one of the dangerous radioactive gases.
By launching a Web site to spread the word about its radon testing services, Radon Measurement of Illinois will become part of the digitally savvy minority among SMBs.
While radon is recognized as being causally associated with lung cancer, national-level studies are important to estimate attributable disease burden, increase awareness and develop population health policy.
Radon is formed when uranium in the soil and rocks beneath us decays.
Most of radon radiation and its progeny is easily absorbed by human's skin surface, therefore human's inner irradiance is the most important, that is the irradiance due to inhaled radon decay products in the organism (Hess et al.