rafts


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Related to rafts: Lipid rafts

raft 1

 (răft)
n.
1. A flat structure, typically made of planks, logs, or barrels, that floats on water and is used for transport or as a platform for swimmers.
2. A flatbottom inflatable craft for floating or drifting on water: shooting the rapids in a rubber raft.
v. raft·ed, raft·ing, rafts
v.tr.
1. To convey on a raft.
2. To make into a raft.
v.intr.
To travel by raft.

[Middle English, from Old Norse raptr, beam, rafter.]

raft 2

(răft)
n. Informal
A great number, amount, or collection: "As the prairie dog goes, conservation biologists say, so may go a raft of other creatures" (William K. Stevens).

[Originally American English, alteration (probably influenced by raft) of dialectal English (Scotland and Northern England) raff, a large collection or number (of something), abundance, from Middle English raf in rif and raf, everything, one and all, sweepings, rubbish; see riffraff.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rafts - a large number or amountrafts - a large number or amount; "made lots of new friends"; "she amassed stacks of newspapers"
large indefinite amount, large indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is above the average in size or magnitude
References in classic literature ?
These rafts were of a shape and construction to suit the crookedness and extreme narrowness of the Neckar.
I used to sit for hours in my glass cage, watching the long, narrow rafts slip along through the central channel, grazing the right-bank dike and aiming carefully for the middle arch of the stone bridge below; I watched them in this way, and lost all this time hoping to see one of them hit the bridge-pier and wreck itself sometime or other, but was always disappointed.
Let us make several rafts, and carry them to a suitable place.
Even had the opposite banks, therefore, been such as to permit a continuance of their journey, it would have been madness to attempt to pass the tumultuous current either on rafts or otherwise.
The June rise used to be always luck for me; because as soon as that rise begins here comes cordwood float- ing down, and pieces of log rafts -- sometimes a dozen logs together; so all you have to do is to catch them and sell them to the wood-yards and the sawmill.
But the raft was nearly done, and after the Tin Woodman had cut a few more logs and fastened them together with wooden pins, they were ready to start.
The current flows toward the Winkie Country," said he; "and so, if we had a boat, or a raft, the river would float us there more quickly and more easily than we could walk.
When this was done I went down the ship's side, and pulling them to me, I tied four of them together at both ends as well as I could, in the form of a raft, and laying two or three short pieces of plank upon them crossways, I found I could walk upon it very well, but that it was not able to bear any great weight, the pieces being too light.
He is to be convoyed neither by gods nor men, but after a perilous voyage of twenty days upon a raft he is to reach fertile Scheria, {50} the land of the Phaeacians, who are near of kin to the gods, and will honour him as though he were one of ourselves.
While the carriage and horses were being placed on it, they also stepped on the raft.
There was a small log raft there which they meant to capture.
He had hardly uttered the words before the whole group rushed to the ruins, and began to pick up iron bolts, and screws, and pieces of wood and ropes, whatever materials they could find that were suitable for the construction of a raft.